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Dogs!

Old 05-10-11, 04:12 PM
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invisibleink07
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Dogs!

When you see a dog running towards you what is your reaction, go faster turn around? Do you think they are friendly at first or that they want to eat you? Saw a Mastiff today coming towards me, probably the biggest dog I have seen and wasn't sure what to think.
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Old 05-10-11, 04:19 PM
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i was out and a pit ran up to me and i kicked at its head but it backed off and ran away, if the dog wants to scrap then i dont mind kicking it in the head, not to hurt it or anything but just to show it who is boss.
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Old 05-10-11, 04:38 PM
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I found an air horn to be extremely effective. A surprising amount of time yelling "STAY" loudly has worked = learned that from a friend. There's also spraying with the water bottle.
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Old 05-10-11, 05:06 PM
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99% of the dogs I've encountered have been territorial driven and mostly not serious. I yell louding at them which usely works. I never stop pedaling. To do so would give them an easy target to nip. For the serious 1%, a well timed kick and/or a squirt in the face with water is in order. If you routinely carry pepper spray, use it. I should carry, but don't.

For a charging Mastiff, Pit Bull, or pack, pray. Or, if your 45 is handy, use it, as you life is at risk.
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Old 05-10-11, 05:06 PM
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I'm not too worried unless it's a pack, then they tend to get on both sides of you. I can usually unclip and keep my foot between the dog and my wheels. A spray with the water bottle tends to get them to stop short. Sometimes a bit of yelling will make them turn back, sometimes not.
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Old 05-10-11, 05:10 PM
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Old 05-10-11, 05:45 PM
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They just want to pee on your wheels.
 
Old 05-10-11, 06:29 PM
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My first reaction is usually , oh man, then to reach for the peper spray. Yes most of the time they just want to play. But we've no way of knowing.
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Old 05-10-11, 07:12 PM
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First line of defense, yell a command to "Stay, bad dog!" Second line of defense...stop, pull out the dog dazer, third, pepper spray.
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Old 05-10-11, 07:16 PM
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Bear spray, no mercy, I've been bitten, do not plan to be bitten again. I also sprayed an owner after he caught up to me on a Harley after I sprayed his dog in front of his trailer. No Mercy
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Old 05-10-11, 07:45 PM
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When I see a dog running toward me, whether I'm on the bike or not, the first thing I look at is its body language. Is it coming hard and serious or in a playful -hey, someone to chase or check out- kind of way? I respond accordingly. So far I've found that a loud and strong "HEY!" is effective at startling the dog into stopping and rethinking it's action. However, if there's more than one dog, especially three or more, then you probably have a true risk of danger. Three dogs together will almost always have a pack mentality.

To date we've had two pit bulls jump their fences to chase us. Once while DH and I were cycling; that pit bull was a lovely female who only wanted to jog with us a bit. She was quite friendly and, I think, lonely. The other was during our walk and that one was young, somewhat territorial but not too serious. I turned and shouted at him and he returned home. We've been chased by one JRT that we began calling "Eddie" based on his frantic attempts to take our shoes as we cycled by. I was more worried about him getting hit by a car as he chased us than I was about him actually hurting us.

Mastiff's are known for being gentle creatures, but they are protective of their family. What happened with the one you encountered?
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Old 05-10-11, 08:09 PM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by gamecock View Post
Bear spray, no mercy, I've been bitten, do not plan to be bitten again. I also sprayed an owner after he caught up to me on a Harley after I sprayed his dog in front of his trailer. No Mercy
I heard of a rider who tried to spray a dog with his bear spray. He hit the trigger, then promply rode through the cloud of bear off. He said he ended up on the ground in agony, and the dog was sitting near him unscathed.
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Old 05-10-11, 08:55 PM
  #13  
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I've always gotten off the bike and put the bike between myself and the dog. When the dog gets close I point my finger and say "Bad dog!" or "No!" very loudly and firmly. So far it's worked every time. If the dog is defending it's territory, I'll walk across the road to let it think it scared me away, then when I'm clear of the dog's territory I'll cross back to my side of the road and resume riding. Getting off the bike seems to change the dog's perception of you from "threat" or "prey" to "person", and yelling at the dog seems to tell them that you're in charge. If I lived or toured in an area where I expected truly aggressive dogs, I would carry Mace or pepper spray, if it was legal.

Years ago, I was out for a ride when I encountered a Great Dane that wanted to play. He had his front paws up on my shoulders and was licking my face when the owner came up, apologized and got the dog off me.

My only truly scary incident was near a farm in Sicily, about 3 or 4 dogs came out of the farmyard. They were starting to go from loud barking to growling, and one of them was working his way around behind me when the owner strolled out and chased them back in the yard.
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Old 05-10-11, 09:26 PM
  #14  
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I'm personally getting tired of dog owners. At least 3 people in our regular group have been hurt, some pretty bad by dogs this year. One of them had a small dog literally jump into his front wheel. Ate his spokes, broke his carbon fork and sent him head over heels with predictable results (road rash) and a hurt back. Another was knocked off the bike by a dog. Just this evening, me and a riding partner slammed on our brakes as a large pit mix ran at us into the street agressively (in front) - and he had a problem clipping out in an emergency stop and laid his bike over 10 miles from civilization. Ruined his chain, bent and twisted it - probably bent his derailleur hanger, too.

I'm really tired of it.
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Old 05-10-11, 10:00 PM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by markf View Post
I've always gotten off the bike and put the bike between myself and the dog. When the dog gets close I point my finger and say "Bad dog!" or "No!" very loudly and firmly. So far it's worked every time. If the dog is defending it's territory, I'll walk across the road to let it think it scared me away, then when I'm clear of the dog's territory I'll cross back to my side of the road and resume riding. Getting off the bike seems to change the dog's perception of you from "threat" or "prey" to "person", and yelling at the dog seems to tell them that you're in charge. If I lived or toured in an area where I expected truly aggressive dogs, I would carry Mace or pepper spray, if it was legal.

Years ago, I was out for a ride when I encountered a Great Dane that wanted to play. He had his front paws up on my shoulders and was licking my face when the owner came up, apologized and got the dog off me.
This. I've never had any trouble with dogs that I couldn't handle by stopping and demonstrating to them where they are in the pack...which is at the very bottom.

Most times, they just want to visit.
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Old 05-10-11, 10:33 PM
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What happened with the one you encountered?
The mastiff I see everyone once in a while on a route I take. Once he ran after me with a lab and I got away before they got to close, today people were outside and once he started running towards me I stopped and his owners called him back before he got close.
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Old 05-11-11, 05:37 AM
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ride with a pebble or two in your pocket
usually only the gesture alone of reaching into the pocket and getting ready to throw something (moving your hand behind shoulders) is enough to scare them away

Peru had some really ugly dogs
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Old 05-11-11, 09:44 AM
  #18  
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If the dog's intent is questionable, I stop off the road, pull out my bear spray, and aim it at the dog's face. If the owner is watching, the dog will be more likely called off. If not, having THE ANSWER gives my voice the confidence required to disuade the dog. I've never had to use the spray after a kajillion (25k+) miles of touring even through Kentucky and the Native American enclaves of the Southwest.

Also, I sure wouldn't want to have wasted bear spray on a dog.
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Old 05-11-11, 10:28 AM
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Years ago I used to try to outrun the dog, but that usually ended up with me speeding down the road nearly out of control while I was trying to fend off the dog and control the bike at the same time. The biggest danger in this was not the dog - it was me veering out into traffic due to the distraction. Eventually I learned that merely stopping the bike, getting off and talking to the dog was enough to stop the attack. Usually they stay about 10 feet away barking, until they get tired of that and return to their property. Sometimes they keep barking so I just walk the bike until they get bored and leave. Hasn't failed me yet.
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Old 05-11-11, 10:34 AM
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I was in the Sinai this winter (egypt). Little dog ran up to me as I was cruising at almost walking pace, kind of as if he wanted to sniff, no barking or aggressive behaviour... bit me in the leg, turned round and walked slowly away!

Tetanus injection and five rabies injections over the course of a month.... Rabies is a real danger in many parts of the world :/
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Old 05-11-11, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
This. I've never had any trouble with dogs that I couldn't handle by stopping and demonstrating to them where they are in the pack...which is at the very bottom.
Yup... Same here... Lots of bad information dispensed regularly on this topic. Stopping is by far the best thing to do.

I have absolutely ZERO fear of big dogs and they pick up on this quite quick. Continuing to ride while trying to 'blast' the pursuing dog with whatever is a bad idea. Sure it might work sometimes but when it doesn't, something bad is sure to happen.

~kn
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Old 05-11-11, 01:48 PM
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+1 to this. For someone who doesn't know dogs, this can be a scary tactic to use, but it's the only one that makes any sense given what we know of dog behaviour.

In my view treating encounters like they're going to be violent is the best way to make them turn violent, while the opposite is often true as well. This goes for humans as well. To this end I don't carry pepper spray (but know how to put an aggressive dog down and stay fairly safe around bears and cougars) or a gun (but I think I can wail on your average human pretty effectively as well).

Things have been pretty peaceful for me on all fronts for the last 32 years.

Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
This. I've never had any trouble with dogs that I couldn't handle by stopping and demonstrating to them where they are in the pack...which is at the very bottom.

Most times, they just want to visit.
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Old 05-11-11, 02:59 PM
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+1 for stopping.

from my blog:
The Dog
Sooner or later a dog encounter would have to happen. I was surprised that I only had one encounter. It was in Boone country on E57 right after crossing the Des Moines river and going up hill. To the right of the road (south side) there is a single house a bit higher up then the road itself. From there a huge brown dog came down full speed with a mean bark and locking horrible aggressive. There was no chance of outrunning the dog as I was working my way slowly up the hill. I removed the safety of my weapon and prepared for the confrontation. Yes, as a bicyclist you should always have a full water bottle in reach not only for regular hydration but also to spray dogs that love to chase bikes. This time there would not be a chase. With the hill and the size of dog it didn't make any sense to stay on the bike. So as soon as he started crossing the ditch I dismounted. As the bike stopped and I touched the ground the dog did a 180 degree turn and ran up the ditch to stand on the top and bark at me. It was funny to see the dog getting suddenly that afraid of me and retreat all the sudden from a full out charge. So I started walking up the hill a bit and then mounted the bike again and continued climbing the hill while the dog barked and watched me nicely from a distance. Yes the moral of this story is to stay calm, get off the bike, keep the bike between you and the dog, and have a full water bottle ready. BTW, some people think pepper sprays are useful to carry. I disagree. In the heat of the moment if I had used the pepper spray I would certainly have not thought about the south wind that would have blown everything straight into my face instead of the dog.
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Old 05-11-11, 04:19 PM
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I have encountered many dogs while touring with a loaded bike. I have never been bit or had any other serious outcome from these encounters.
On the other hand I have had a few dog owners who think that somehow I am at fault for their dog running out onto the road as I am riding by. These encounters have not always gone smoothly!
Happy touring
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Old 05-11-11, 08:57 PM
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As someone who has never had a dog...when I'm riding through a rural area and a dog leaves the front porch to go chase a passing bike...it's terrifying! Maybe I shouldn't be scared, but it's a spit-second response. Sometimes dogs boot it towards you and just stop at the end of the driveway. Sometimes they give chase on the road...I've always just biked away quickly full of adrenaline. I've never had the presence of mind to do otherwise.

I met one hiker who said that when he meets aggressive dogs he raises his walking stick as if he'll strike. The dog usually understands and runs away. I don't know if that is a good technique but I carried a stick with me on that trip from then on...

one another note, I've biked across every Canadian province and the only place I've been chased by dogs is New Brunswick.

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