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Need help picking a tent for solo use.

Old 06-04-11, 09:11 PM
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Thanks for all of the replies. I think I am going to give it one more day and choose on Monday. I really think I am leaning more towards the seedhouse. The pack size is a ton smaller, the color is better(not that this is a huge issue), and I will save a little cash. I would still love to hear from anyone using this tent.
Thanks again everyone. Will let you know the outcome.
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Old 06-04-11, 09:24 PM
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I know you are looking for a tent, however, if you are planning on touring in say a heavily wooded area that doesn't get alot of rain (or at least not much while you are touring). You could also check into a hammock such as a https://www.rei.com/product/754769/en...lenest-hammock. Not only are they extremely light (<1lb), they are comfy, can fit in your pack, and most importantly are cheap.
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Old 06-04-11, 09:45 PM
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Originally Posted by bigflats
Anyone else have any experience with the seedhouse sl2? I plan on using it mainly solo or with the wife. I am 6 ft with a large thermarest. Choices choices.
I used a Seedhouse Sl2 for a week and while it was roomy enough (I'm 6' as well) I had real issues with the design. The rainfly hangs over the tent in such a way that opening it after a dewy morning dumped water into the tent and on my sleeping bag. During rain it would be even worse, since there was no overhang to keep rain out of the tent when getting in and out. I ended up exchanging it for an REI Quarterdome. Not only does it provide excellent headroom, but I can toss bags under one side, and get in and out on the other. More importantly, the rainfly actually works to keep the rain out.
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Old 06-04-11, 09:58 PM
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Such mixed reviews. Going with Big agnes either way. Love the copper spur design but I dont need the double doors for single person use. If only the copper spur packed as small as the seedhouse. Could always pack the tent and fly and strap the poles. HMMM. What a pain.
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Old 06-04-11, 10:03 PM
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I am in Austin Texas so not a ton of rain, but will be in the north east as well as west in the future a few times. The hammock idea is great, but for camping I am a tent guy for sure.
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Old 06-04-11, 11:00 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by lshiva
I used a Seedhouse Sl2 for a week and while it was roomy enough (I'm 6' as well) I had real issues with the design. The rainfly hangs over the tent in such a way that opening it after a dewy morning dumped water into the tent and on my sleeping bag. During rain it would be even worse, since there was no overhang to keep rain out of the tent when getting in and out. I ended up exchanging it for an REI Quarterdome. Not only does it provide excellent headroom, but I can toss bags under one side, and get in and out on the other. More importantly, the rainfly actually works to keep the rain out.
I've been caught in downpours with my Seedhouse and never felt that keeping water out was an issue either when getting into, or out, of the tent. I do, however, tend to stay in the tent during rain.

While the Quarter Dome is an okay product (my daughter has one), it's hardly on the same level as the Copper Spur or the Seedhouse. It weighs 1.5 lbs more than the Seedhouse and packs way larger - 7.5x20 vs 6.5x16. It's only $20 less than the Seedhouse SL2 in price (full retail).

The Seedhouse is also much easier to set up. The Quarter Dome has some funky poles that make set up more difficult and less intuitive. If the features of the Quarter dome (less A-frame with 2 doors) appeals to you, I'd suggest spending the extra cash on the Copper Spur. Less weight, easier setup and a similar packed size. The price of the Copper Spur may seem high but tents will last you for several years to decades. You'll get your value out of it.
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Old 06-04-11, 11:14 PM
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Originally Posted by bigflats
Such mixed reviews. Going with Big agnes either way. Love the copper spur design but I dont need the double doors for single person use. If only the copper spur packed as small as the seedhouse. Could always pack the tent and fly and strap the poles. HMMM. What a pain.
I have a Fly Creek UL2, and while you haven't mentioned it as an option, I'd at least caution you to my experience with it (and don't know if it'll apply to the SH or CS). While it is fantastically light and compact (I bought it for lightweight [semi-ultralight] backpacking) for its features, it is advertised as being free-standing though in reality you need to stake/guy it out to get all of the usable space. While it isn't hard to do, at the end of a long day it adds hassle (and a tripping hazard :-) to getting it pitched.

While I've been considering using the Fly Creek for bike touring, I think I've decided I'll carry my ~20yo North Face Tadpole instead. While it's twice the weight [not heavy, just not verging on ultralight], it is completely free-standing.
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Old 06-05-11, 05:02 AM
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Not sure if this is really relevant here, as I'm in the UK and am on a budget, but I got a Highlander Forces 2 tent, which was originally designed, I believe, for the British Military. Being designed for the British military is no great thing in some respects, though, as the designs are usually good, but the manufacture and materials constrained by budgets. The tent is really stable and gives great space inside, and has a good porch. The main problem is it comes with fibreglass poles, which are heavy and long when collapsed. Luckily, I found some alu replacements which when collapsed fit into my pannier and are much lighter. The whole thing for me weighs 2.2 kg (my cutoff for a tent was 2.5), and it packs down small enough to fit in the bottom half of a pannier. Best thing is the whole lot, with replacement poles cost about £55.
It's a one man tent, but has headroom and length to make it feel like a two man. Again, not really relevant to those in the US, as I imagine you can't get it over there, but a great option for those in the UK reading this, who may be looking for a good tent on a budget, and are prepared to do a bit of modding.
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Old 06-05-11, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by anotherbrian
I have a Fly Creek UL2, and while you haven't mentioned it as an option, I'd at least caution you to my experience with it (and don't know if it'll apply to the SH or CS). While it is fantastically light and compact (I bought it for lightweight [semi-ultralight] backpacking) for its features, it is advertised as being free-standing though in reality you need to stake/guy it out to get all of the usable space. While it isn't hard to do, at the end of a long day it adds hassle (and a tripping hazard :-) to getting it pitched.

While I've been considering using the Fly Creek for bike touring, I think I've decided I'll carry my ~20yo North Face Tadpole instead. While it's twice the weight [not heavy, just not verging on ultralight], it is completely free-standing.
The Fly Creek could be considered to be an ultra-ultralight. It only has one pole at the rear of the tent so it only has 3 pole contact points with the ground...2 at the door and one in the rear. The Seedhouse and Copper Spur are more traditional A-frame tents with 4 contact points...one at each corner. They have more poles and thus weigh more.

I, personally, would never leave a tent unstaked. I've seen too many tents kiting across campgrounds - including one of my own which had been staked and guyed - to trust a 'freestanding' tent without someone inside it. Since you can't be inside them all the time, it's best to stake them down. Fishing a tent, sleeping bag, pad, clothing, etc out of a lake is no fun and makes for a very wet night
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Old 06-06-11, 10:19 AM
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Originally Posted by bigflats
Such mixed reviews. Going with Big agnes either way. Love the copper spur design but I dont need the double doors for single person use. If only the copper spur packed as small as the seedhouse. Could always pack the tent and fly and strap the poles. HMMM. What a pain.

Having two doors is pretty sweet, even when solo. You can stuff your panniers/gear under the vestibule of one side and get in and out of the tent on the other, while still having access to your gear from the inside. And if you do camp with someone else you won't be climbing over them to get out.
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Old 06-06-11, 08:42 PM
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I have a golite pyramid shaped tent, the Shangri La 4+.


Here's a similar tent: https://www.golite.com/Product/ProdDe...10&mc=&t=&lat=

It's floorless and big enough to park a loaded bike under.

To go with that, I have a nylon ground cloth that I sometimes use, and a Marmot mesh bivy that serves to keep water and bugs out of my sleeping area.

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Old 06-07-11, 02:13 AM
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Originally Posted by zoltani
Personally I would rather have side doors rather than the front door of the seedhouse. Just my two cents.
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Old 06-07-11, 10:23 AM
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Hilleberg AKTO.. https://www.hilleberg.com/
+ 2 freestanding Solo tents..
in green to hide better stealth camp, or red to see in snow.

Last edited by fietsbob; 06-07-11 at 02:39 PM.
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Old 06-07-11, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Standalone
I have a golite pyramid shaped tent, the Shangri La 4+.


Here's a similar tent: https://www.golite.com/Product/ProdDe...10&mc=&t=&lat=

It's floorless and big enough to park a loaded bike under.

To go with that, I have a nylon ground cloth that I sometimes use, and a Marmot mesh bivy that serves to keep water and bugs out of my sleeping area.

I love the idea of a tipi, and it's a great idea taking the smaller inner.
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Old 06-07-11, 02:37 PM
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There is a Mozzy net inner tent with those pyramid ones , there is a hex floor 3 person Go lite. too.
Black diamonds Mega light supplies a carbon Fiber Center pole in that version
mega mid , a bit different fabric and aluminum center pole ,
also an inner mozzy shelter is FS, add on
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Old 06-08-11, 08:08 AM
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I started off with the Big Agnes Seedhouse SL1, and after spending a couple evenings in it, I figured out that when they said one-person tent, they were pretty serious about it. So, I updgraded to the Seedhouse SL2 about two years ago, and have been very pleased with it. It fits me comfortably with room to sit up and fiddle about, and there's no problem about bringing my panniers indoors with me if I want to. It takes a little more room to pack (meaning that I strap it to the bike rack instead of stashing it in a pannier like I can with the SL1), but the weight difference is negligible when accounting for the added space/comfort. Now, when you add in a roommate, it does get a little "cozy" in there...

If you want side doors, I would look at MSR's Hubba Hubba tent. If I ever replace or upgrade the Seedhouse, that's probably what I would replace it with.
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Old 06-08-11, 08:49 AM
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https://www.rei.com/product/812848/al...nt-special-buy
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Old 06-10-11, 08:33 AM
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This is stating the obvious, but one thing I did before choosing a tent was to read the online reviews from several sites (besides this one). Boy, were they eye openers! I had it narrowed down to about 3 tents and the really negative reviews of one (the mesh wasn't very sturdy) steered me away from it. Since this was a one-time purchase, I was willing to spend the $$ for reduced weight and quality. After that, it was just which one had the features I preferred. Again, I read the reviews and was really comfortable with the choice I made. It didn't hurt that my searching also turned up a site which gave me an amazing deal (lower price and free footprint).

FWIW, the two side doors are handier than you'd think. It's not about a second person having his/her own entrance, but in the single person size, you can use the second vestibule for storage as another poster said. Also, with the limited space, it's much easier to just roll out of the side, instead of crawling out to the front. Like anything else, it just depends on what specific requirements you have.
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Old 06-13-11, 06:16 AM
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Originally Posted by anotherbrian
I have a Fly Creek UL2, and while you haven't mentioned it as an option, I'd at least caution you to my experience with it (and don't know if it'll apply to the SH or CS). While it is fantastically light and compact (I bought it for lightweight [semi-ultralight] backpacking) for its features, it is advertised as being free-standing though in reality you need to stake/guy it out to get all of the usable space. While it isn't hard to do, at the end of a long day it adds hassle (and a tripping hazard :-) to getting it pitched.

While I've been considering using the Fly Creek for bike touring, I think I've decided I'll carry my ~20yo North Face Tadpole instead. While it's twice the weight [not heavy, just not verging on ultralight], it is completely free-standing.
___
Well I tried to do the ul thing and bought a TarpTent Squall 2 last year. I've used it 5 times. In those times I can only say I was able to pitch it taunt once because of the surfaces I was on. In the real world I have to sleep where I can, soft or hard ground. I would not want to go through a level 3 rain storm in Taiwan. No way.

So I ordered a new NF Tadpole. This is my second one. The old one wore out but lasted 10 years. It is solid, free standing, and able to handle high winds. I'll carry something I can depend on.

Also the Gram Weenie by Bull Design isn't solid either. After the first one failed because the thumb screw wouldn't come out, he was kind enough to send another. So I used it for 4 nights and found the only "cooking" I could do with it is boil water. Useful solo camping but not for 2.
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Old 06-13-11, 09:31 AM
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I was about to mention Tarptents (www.tarptent.com) if you haven't chosen yet. I don't know why the above poster had problems with it, but I've hiked with two people who used them, helped set them up and take them down, and slept in them, and I'd say they're the best option. You can get a two-person tent for not much more than than the weight of a lot of one-person tents, they're quite easy to set up, quite stable (point the front door into the wind and use panniers/bags to create a wind barrier for the lower part that's not protected by the beak, and you'll be quite comfy) and have plenty of room inside. They're meant to be used with trekking poles, so for biking you need to take along one or two extra poles for the front, but those don't weigh much more at all. You can get a one person tent for even lighter, but at that weight I'd take a two-person model just for the extra room.

If you really just need shelter for one person and will be in places with trees, I'd say you owe it to yourself to try a hammock. I have a 60 dollar hammock with bugnet attached (Grand Trunk Skeeter Beeter) that's lightyears ahead of sleeping on the ground in terms of comfort, and all you need is a tarp to hang over it (covers your bike as well) and you're set.
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