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Where's the book?

Old 06-25-11, 05:37 PM
  #1  
Igo
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Where's the book?

Where's the book? on 'How to reason and build a bicycle'?
I've seen hundreds of shopping and/or wish lists and as many recommendations but none mean anything but words to me. I have a degree in industrial mechanics. If there is a 'How To' book on how to build a touring bike, I need it badly. Then I could make sense of these shopping list. Does this book or web page exists? Evey thing here are resources AFTER you have the basics. Where are the basics?
Thanks gang!
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Old 06-25-11, 07:13 PM
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I know, right? I'm in the same conundrum, although I don't have any background in mechanics whatsoever. I am having specific issues, namely dealing with putting on a headset and figuring out how long to leave my steering tube.
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Old 06-25-11, 07:23 PM
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There is no guide to the 'perfect touring bicycle'. A touring bike is different things to different people and range from a cyclist with a backpack on a FG to the two wheeled version of a Clydesdale horse.

Brad
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Old 06-25-11, 08:14 PM
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There is no book, only experience. When I first got into cycling, I bought a bike off the showroom floor and rode it for a while. Didn't like a few things, so I changed them. Didn't like a couple of the changes, so I changed them again. When I got around to touring, I essentially did the same thing: bought a frame, bolted some components to it, rode it for a while, then made a few changes before I left on my first tour.

It's also important to realize that you don't have to obsess over everything. Sure, you can find guys with too much time on their hands who'll debate ad nauseum the differences in cables or handlebar tape. Even so, there are a bunch of parts I rarely spend time worrying about, including the headset, cables, bottom bracket, stem, bar tape, and to some degree brakes and seatpost. Grab the right size from some recognizable brand and move on to the stuff that matters.
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Old 06-25-11, 08:51 PM
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Originally Posted by thesearethesuns View Post
I know, right? I'm in the same conundrum, although I don't have any background in mechanics whatsoever. I am having specific issues, namely dealing with putting on a headset and figuring out how long to leave my steering tube.
Yours can be answered with this:
https://www.amazon.com/Big-Blue-Book-.../dp/0976553007
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Old 06-25-11, 08:57 PM
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It's a bicycle, not the space shuttle.
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Old 06-25-11, 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by bradtx View Post
There is no guide to the 'perfect touring bicycle'. A touring bike is different things to different people and range from a cyclist with a backpack on a FG to the two wheeled version of a Clydesdale horse.

Brad
I understand this completely. The questions I need answers to is several hundred like these:
Better to use small gears in front and big gears in back or larger gears up front and not so large in back?
What math to figure if a chain will be too long or too short?
How to I choose for different geometry? Why titanium? Why not? Sidewall construction? Load bearing members. Width for wheels AND rear sprockets and how to calculate chain departures/binding on paper. How are crank sets made? .....and about a thousand other questions like these.
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Old 06-25-11, 09:01 PM
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Originally Posted by kuan View Post
It's a bicycle, not the space shuttle.
Everything is a space shuttle. Inquiring minds and all that.....
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Old 06-25-11, 09:05 PM
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Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
There is no book, only experience. When I first got into cycling, I bought a bike off the showroom floor and rode it for a while. Didn't like a few things, so I changed them. Didn't like a couple of the changes, so I changed them again. When I got around to touring, I essentially did the same thing: bought a frame, bolted some components to it, rode it for a while, then made a few changes before I left on my first tour.

It's also important to realize that you don't have to obsess over everything. Sure, you can find guys with too much time on their hands who'll debate ad nauseum the differences in cables or handlebar tape. Even so, there are a bunch of parts I rarely spend time worrying about, including the headset, cables, bottom bracket, stem, bar tape, and to some degree brakes and seatpost. Grab the right size from some recognizable brand and move on to the stuff that matters.
Thank you sir. And I understand these things you tell me but I like to break things down. It's what I do for a living. I work in an engineering department. I enjoy having detailed understanding of how and why. Then I get into it so far and one day it clicks and I decide the project is done and I move on to another challenge. It's what I do.
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Old 06-25-11, 10:07 PM
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If you have a technical background and want some reading material, I would start with The Bicycle Wheel by Jobst Brant. The wheels are the most important part of a reliable bicycle, and the least understood.
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Old 06-25-11, 10:20 PM
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Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
If you have a technical background and want some reading material, I would start with The Bicycle Wheel by Jobst Brant. The wheels are the most important part of a reliable bicycle, and the least understood.
That is quite a coincidence you mention this. I was just now reading a couple guys thoughts on spoke flex and the difference in influences on spokes between disc breaks and rim breaks. Hugely enlightening and exactly the kind of information I need to help build a bike the way i want it.
Sheldon Brown and a fellow here with the handle of cyccommute I think. Great food.
I will look into Jobst Brant. Thank you very much.
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Old 06-26-11, 06:44 AM
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I understand this completely. The questions I need answers to is several hundred like these:
Better to use small gears in front and big gears in back or larger gears up front and not so large in back?
-For loaded touring an acceptable range is 20-95 gear inches.
What math to figure if a chain will be too long or too short?
-Because chainstay lengths differ the chain is a 'to fit' item/
How to I choose for different geometry?
-Loaded touring frames are in the 71-73 degree range and also depends on the fork kick out. This is to provide stability when loaded with gear.
Why titanium? Why not?
-Ti tends to be flexy unless starting with a 6Al recipe.
Sidewall construction?
-Which sidewall?
Load bearing members.
-An off the shelf touring frame can be loaded beyond what's practical to pedal. Carriers usually have a load limit.
Width for wheels
-17.5-18 mm inner width to mount 28-40 mm tires
AND rear sprockets and how to calculate chain departures/binding on paper.
- I've no answer
How are crank sets made?
-Generally machined propriatory cast aluminum
.....and about a thousand other questions like these.

Brad
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Old 06-26-11, 06:45 AM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by Igo View Post
I understand this completely. The questions I need answers to is several hundred like these:
Better to use small gears in front and big gears in back or larger gears up front and not so large in back?
What math to figure if a chain will be too long or too short?
How to I choose for different geometry? Why titanium? Why not? Sidewall construction? Load bearing members. Width for wheels AND rear sprockets and how to calculate chain departures/binding on paper. How are crank sets made? .....and about a thousand other questions like these.
You might like Bicycling Science by David Wilson. Make sure you get the newer 3rd edition.
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Old 06-26-11, 07:28 AM
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"Bicycle Science" This may be what I'm looking for. Thank you.
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Old 06-28-11, 01:38 PM
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This most recent Rivendell Reader has a really good description of frame geometry, how each angle affects the ride, and how they relate to each other. Starts on page 8. It might help some. https://www.rivbike.com/assets/payloa...ginal_RR43.pdf
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Old 06-28-11, 02:31 PM
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If there is no book out there then Google. Learn. Build. Write the book.
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Old 06-28-11, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by indemnitypop View Post
This most recent Rivendell Reader has a really good description of frame geometry, how each angle affects the ride, and how they relate to each other. Starts on page 8. It might help some. https://www.rivbike.com/assets/payloa...ginal_RR43.pdf
Wow. This looks great. Thank you.
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