Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Need your help/advice on a new bike!

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Need your help/advice on a new bike!

Old 08-01-11, 07:40 PM
  #1  
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Illinois
Posts: 3
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Need your help/advice on a new bike!

Hi, I'm new to this board and new to biking all together actually. I sort of fell in love with biking all over again early this summer. I hadn't been on a bike in about 10 years due to an old knee injury which miraculously stopped bothering me a few years ago. I at the time bought a 2008 Trek7200 women's hybrid. A heavy comfy bike that I thought would be nice for short bikerides around Chicago.
I realized way too late that I made the wrong decision. I found that I LOVE long rides. I've started to do 35 miles a day on this bike and it's just not made for this in my opinion. I'm 5'7 and 102lbs and I'm hauling my butt to get this thing moving. I'm very interested in doing centuries one day and some light touring also. I want a bike that I can easily do a century on and not feel like I'm trucking along, but also something that I could maybe do a 3-4 night tour on. I was looking at the Salsa Casseroll, but because I'm so new to this I figured that you guys would probably have more insight and hopefully more suggestions? I'm willing to go up to $1800 USD.
Sorry for such a long post!
bonjay8 is offline  
Old 08-01-11, 08:52 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
cyclist2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Up
Posts: 4,695

Bikes: Masi, Giant TCR, Eisentraut (retired), Jamis Aurora Elite, Zullo, Cannondale, 84 & 93 Stumpjumpers, Waterford, Tern D8, Bianchi, Gunner Roadie, Serotta, Serotta Duette, was gifted a Diamond Back

Liked 2,038 Times in 604 Posts
When you think of touring for a 3-4 night tour, where do you picture yourself doing this, in Illinois?

I looked at the Casseroll and I think that chainstays are a bit on the short side, that may cause heel strike on panniers also the rear cassette is a bit on the small side, this may not have low enough gearing for very hilly touring.

You should try as many touring bikes and cross bike as available. Like the Trek 520, Surley LHT, Jamis Aurora, and too many others to list, and see what fits and feels the best. I think one of the stickies has an excel list of touring bikes

One of my favorites in your price range is the Bruce Gordon BLT at $1700 this includes the Bruce Gordon racks. Another of my favorites is the Gunnar Grand Tour. Frame is about $900 and built up it may cost around $1800

Last edited by cyclist2000; 08-01-11 at 09:14 PM.
cyclist2000 is online now  
Old 08-01-11, 09:02 PM
  #3  
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Illinois
Posts: 3
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
because I'm already located so far north, probably up to Wisconsin to start with.
bonjay8 is offline  
Old 08-02-11, 02:17 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 138
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Like you, I just recently started cycling for long tours. If you want something that goes quickly, I would advise not to get a Long Haul Trucker. It's generally for average speed of riding. The question is whether you will ride lightly loaded or heavily loaded. How much you plan to pack on will determine what kind of bike you'll want. I hope others chime in more. Good luck.
yiffzer is offline  
Old 08-02-11, 05:59 AM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
RepWI's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 414
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by yiffzer
Like you, I just recently started cycling for long tours. If you want something that goes quickly, I would advise not to get a Long Haul Trucker. It's generally for average speed of riding. The question is whether you will ride lightly loaded or heavily loaded. How much you plan to pack on will determine what kind of bike you'll want. I hope others chime in more. Good luck.
I am leaving tomorrow for a short ten day tour on my Surly LHT. I love the bike and am happy to have it. I would though echo viffzer as well. The LHT is heavy and built to slog us through the day at consistent speeds, reliability and comfort.

That said, really look at your purpose for the ride and that will define the bike style you need. Of course, there is nothing wrong with simply having a number of bikes in your stable offering you options in riding style.

Welcome back bike riding.
RepWI is offline  
Old 08-02-11, 08:06 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
BigBlueToe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Coast, CA
Posts: 3,392

Bikes: Surly LHT, Specialized Rockhopper, Nashbar Touring (old), Specialized Stumpjumper (older), Nishiki Tourer (model unknown)

Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
If you want a bike that can do it all, you'll have to realize it won't be ideal for some applications. The LHT is a wonderful tourer, but just a passable century bike. I rode a century on mine and it's okay, but it's too heavy to be an ideal century bike. I have a Specialized Allez that is a wonderful century bike, but wouldn't be very good for a tour. However, it does have mounts for a rear rack; I could probably put some panniers on it for a 3 day tour. I wouldn't want to carry much. Maybe a 3-day tour staying in motels?

Here's my suggestion: Decide what you're going to be doing the most. It sounds like you like long (35-mile?) day rides, with an occasional century. Buy a nice, light bike for that type of riding. An Allez would be a nice, less-expensive choice. If you have the money, consider something like a Specialized Roubaix or Cannondale Synapse (a "plush" road bike - there are lots of others from other brands.) Then, when you are ready to go on a tour, buy another bike - a "real" touring bike, like the LHT. It's good to have a stable of bikes!
BigBlueToe is offline  
Old 08-02-11, 09:01 AM
  #7  
The Left Coast, USA
 
FrenchFit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 3,757

Bikes: Bulls, Bianchi, Koga, Trek, Miyata

Liked 25 Times in 18 Posts
Thumbs up for the Specialized Roubaix, but at your price point it may be out of reach. I echo what's been said, it's all about light as well as plush. You can always make it more utilitarian by adding handlebar or big seat bags, or whatever. You can make them more stable or plush with slightly bigger tires if necessary. But for long hilly or fast rides, you'll be thankful you picked a low mass bike. Leave the touring bikes for loaded touring.
FrenchFit is offline  
Old 08-03-11, 12:55 PM
  #8  
DisMember
 
YokeyDokey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 247

Bikes: 2010 Fuji Roubaix, 1984 Schwinn World Sport

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bonjay8
... I'm 5'7 and 102lbs and I'm hauling my butt to get this thing moving. ...
!? You need to carbo load. A lot - start now. :-D

Sorry. In all seriousness - I am gearing up for my first distance tour, probably the Missouri Katy Trail. I have a stable of bikes but none are proper trekkers and since I just got 3/4ths of them this year I'm not ready to buy another just yet... so, I'm going to tow a trailer instead. Put sturdy 28mm tires on your road bike, hook on a trailer, and BOB's your uncle. hahaha I kill myself - that's an inside bike touring joke.

Last edited by YokeyDokey; 08-03-11 at 01:02 PM.
YokeyDokey is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
santacruising22
Touring
11
06-08-14 11:42 AM
rybakery
Touring
9
04-25-14 12:20 AM
bonjay8
Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling
6
08-18-11 06:58 PM
marmot
Touring
9
11-23-10 09:54 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.