Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Aluminium frame touring?

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Aluminium frame touring?

Old 11-09-11, 09:37 AM
  #1  
ramseykp
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Aluminium frame touring?

I recently obtained a Cadd 3 frame from my friend and have heard some people use it as a touring frame. I am reluctant to do so because I am familiar with the unforgiving nature of aluminium. My question is, How big of a deal is the rigidness when it comes to play on a tour? Could I just add a steel fork and a suspended seat post and call it good? Does anybody else here tour on a aluminium frame? Whats your experience with the comfort?

kelsey
ramseykp is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 09:50 AM
  #2  
Juha
Formerly Known as Newbie
 
Juha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Helsinki, Finland
Posts: 6,250
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
I've toured on two aluminium frame, entry LBS level hybrids, neither of them had any suspension whatsoever. In my case, a proper saddle (Brooks) has been the key to comfortable touring. Your mileage, of course, may vary. Only way to know for sure is to test that frame yourself.

--J
__________________
To err is human. To moo is bovine.

Who is this General Failure anyway, and why is he reading my drive?


Become a Registered Member in Bike Forums
Community guidelines
Juha is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 09:53 AM
  #3  
sstorkel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 5,428

Bikes: Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by ramseykp View Post
How big of a deal is the rigidness when it comes to play on a tour?
I tour on Nashbar's aluminum touring frame. With 700x35 tires, the bike is almost as comfortable as my carbon fiber road bike. Stuck with the skinny tires that you'll be forced to use on a CAAD3, I might be a little worried...
sstorkel is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 10:09 AM
  #4  
LeeG
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,952
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
I find aluminum quill road stems and bars quite forgiving. Rigidity is a good thing in a touring bike once it's loaded up with stuff. Cannondale touring bikes are great. I knew a fellow who had a custom aluminum frame with 44.5" wheelbase. This is a roundabout way of saying that geometry and tires are a bigger issue for comfort than frame material.

sstorkel's point is the bigger issue, 28mm tires on a road bike doesn't make for a great touring bike.
LeeG is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 10:20 AM
  #5  
Cyclebum
Senior Member
 
Cyclebum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: NE Tx
Posts: 2,766

Bikes: Tour Easy, Linear USS, Lightening Thunderbolt, custom DF, Raleigh hybrid, Felt time trial

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Tire width and pressure are the key to vibration damping. Double wrapping the bars can help too.
Cyclebum is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 10:37 AM
  #6  
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Posts: 7,239
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 659 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Agree with the above that the maximum tire size would be the main concern with the CAAD3. I've gone bike camping with my old Cannondale R900 and it worked fine and was comfortable enough. But I was limited to 27mm and smaller tires which weren't the best on dirt and gravel roads.
prathmann is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 11:59 AM
  #7  
bradtx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Pearland, Texas
Posts: 7,576

Bikes: Cannondale, Trek, Raleigh, Santana

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
kelsey, Welcome to the forum.

Aluminum frames are fine for touring, road race frames, of any material are less so. Though a race frame is stiff enough for touring, there are limitations, many can be worked around except tire size limitations.

CAAD3 is a generic design term that Cannondale used across their line of bicycles, which model do you have?

Brad

PS For light, credit card style touring a road frame is fine and if need be a trailer can be used.

Last edited by bradtx; 11-09-11 at 12:01 PM. Reason: PS
bradtx is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 12:17 PM
  #8  
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 10,114
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 554 Post(s)
Liked 156 Times in 126 Posts
Originally Posted by bradtx View Post
PS For light, credit card style touring a road frame is fine
It is also fine for self supported (camping and cooking) if you pack light and especially with a light rider. I plan to do my next tour (Southern Tier) on a Cannondale road bike skinny tires and all but am packing ultralight for this one and did install lower gearing.
__________________
Check out my profile, articles, and trip journals at:
https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/staehpj1
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 12:33 PM
  #9  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,320 Times in 830 Posts
My Koga Miyata WTR is a great world touring rig , Trekking bike..
and they have been used as such, over and over, by many people.

Their frame is made from 7005 aluminum.

Oregon coast sees hundreds of people touring during the summer ..
some are using some pretty racy styled bikes , and having fun.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 03:17 PM
  #10  
seeker333
-
 
seeker333's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 3,865

Bikes: yes!

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 281 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by ramseykp View Post
I recently obtained a Cadd 3....
Mounting the largest tires possible with lower pressure will make any bike's ride more forgiving. If you're proposing swapping the original fork (presumably Al?) for a steel fork, then don't expect much in the way of "ride" improvement. It's not worthwhile strictly for "feel" - I base this upon 4K miles personal experience with a 1996 CAAD3 frame with Al "Pepperoni" fork. A suspended seatpost may help, depending on the post and your posterior.

More than the construction material (Al), you should be concerned if the frame offers adequate chainstay length for the rear rack/bags you intend to carry. Only the Cdale touring models had long CSs, expressly for this purpose. If you're going to pull a trailer or carry only front panniers, then this is not an issue.

There are a number of Al touring-specific fames/bikes that have sold well over the years. Besides the best known (the Cdale T models), there's the Nashbar touring frame, which is only $60 right now, plus shipping and possibly sales tax. Notice it can be purchased along with a color-matched steel fork, the NB-TFF. My shopping cart shows a $107 Total with shipping for the two pieces (before 7% state sales tax added). This is the lowest price I've seen for this combination, since Nashbar started offering the frameset back in 2005(?).

https://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...1_10000_202337

https://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...0052_511246_-1

Last edited by seeker333; 11-09-11 at 03:26 PM.
seeker333 is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 10:05 PM
  #11  
hybridbkrdr
we be rollin'
 
hybridbkrdr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Quebec, Canada
Posts: 1,834
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 138 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Some people use wider tires like 37mm. But, I find from my own point of view that suspension seatposts aren't worth it. I always find I'm never satisfied with the height of the saddle because the seat lowers when you sit on it.
hybridbkrdr is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 11:20 PM
  #12  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,579
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2092 Post(s)
Liked 501 Times in 426 Posts
tire width notwithstanding (Ive done lots of touring on 28s) diff frames have diff feel. My newer Tricross alu framed bike is not as compliant as my old steel tourer, but as it has those curved chainstays, I find that it really isnt that bad, not bad at all. Compared to my 98 alu hardtail mtn bike with straight chainstays, the mtn bike is decidely more harsh in the rear end. I used to have stiff sidewall tires on it and it was unpleasantly stiff. New tires made a diff, but it is still much much harsher than the 2010 tricross. That said, when I have 25 lbs on the rear rack of the mtn bike, it is quite stable and the weight dampens things out. Unloaded I am glad that I have a Brooks on it, as it takes out some of the sting, and Im also careful of being more on the lower end of tire pressures, which helps too (but it does have 40mm tires on, again, a big help)
djb is offline  
Old 11-09-11, 11:21 PM
  #13  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,579
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2092 Post(s)
Liked 501 Times in 426 Posts
Originally Posted by hybridbkrdr View Post
Some people use wider tires like 37mm. But, I find from my own point of view that suspension seatposts aren't worth it. I always find I'm never satisfied with the height of the saddle because the seat lowers when you sit on it.
thats a very good point, one I had never thought of suspension seatposts (never had a need for one, but never considered this)
I suspect this aspect of them would not be an issue for the people they are marketed at, exact seat height for occasional riders is not a big importance.
djb is offline  
Old 11-10-11, 05:53 AM
  #14  
bradtx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Pearland, Texas
Posts: 7,576

Bikes: Cannondale, Trek, Raleigh, Santana

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
It is also fine for self supported (camping and cooking) if you pack light and especially with a light rider. I plan to do my next tour (Southern Tier) on a Cannondale road bike skinny tires and all but am packing ultralight for this one and did install lower gearing.
I tend to be conservative with my suggestions. More so because of the drought we're having and it's very negative effect on rural roads.

Have fun on your tour.

Brad
bradtx is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
3speed
Touring
42
11-19-14 07:57 PM
jonwiebe68
Touring
4
10-18-14 05:02 PM
Barrettscv
Touring
15
01-10-12 09:46 PM
solarwind
Touring
11
10-17-10 03:23 PM
sentinel22
Touring
11
04-15-10 11:38 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.