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Huge Vestibule: Big Agnes Wyoming Trail Tent

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Huge Vestibule: Big Agnes Wyoming Trail Tent

Old 03-04-12, 01:38 PM
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velo2000
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Huge Vestibule: Big Agnes Wyoming Trail Tent

https://www.bigagnes.com/Products/De...yomingtrailsl2

I just found this tent online today and I'm wondering if anyone has seen it in person or used it. It's a bit heavy at 7.5 pounds for a 2 person tent, but it has a huge vestibule. I wonder if you could park a couple bikes in the vestibule leaned against each other. I've been looking at 3 person tents to provide enough room for two people and gear on an extended tour, but this huge vestibule looks tempting.

Specs on the Big Agnes tent:

Trail Weight 6lb 14oz
Packed Weight 7lb 8oz
Footprint Weight 1lb 1oz
Fast Fly Weight 6lb 5oz
Packed Size 8x24
Floor Area 31sq ft
Vestibule Area 39sq ft
Head Height 52"

I could see the vestibule being handy for cooking in bad weather, more space to relax in, change clothes in, store gear in, park bikes out of the weather, etc.

Thoughts? Here's a photo:

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Old 03-04-12, 04:10 PM
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Hmm 8lbs might be ok spread across 2 bikes. The fly alone would take up one whole pannier. I have a BA UL 1 and it's a great tent. Never been wet in it. It has seen many many backpacking trips. They definitly make a good product. I would also try to see how long those poles are when folded. I does make me cringe when I have to leave the bike out in the rain all night but it can't be helped. I have used the footprint for my tent to throw over the bike handlebars at times. You may want to use a rainfly for a bivy. String it across a line between 2 trees and tie down all 4 corners.
You can lean the bikes against each other under that. It's lighter and definitly cheaper.
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Old 03-04-12, 05:24 PM
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Looks good for most of what you suggest doing with it. Tent floor area is ok for two very friendly people. Peak height is great. Brand is A+. Split between two bikes, weight and bulk are manageable.

I doubt you could put two bikes in that vestibule. One tent door would make entry/exit a chore with two bikes and gear in the vestibule. There should be two doors.

If you really want a vestibule that big, consider a light plastic cover for the bikes. You'll rarely need it. Save the vestibule for yourselves.
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Old 03-04-12, 06:26 PM
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When locating a tent site (if I have that choice), I avoid trees with dead limbs that might fall onto the tent in a storm, always upwind from a potential campfire when with groups (sparks melt nylon), and bikes are located close enough so I can possibly detect critter intrusion yet far enough away so if they fall over I won't get a concussion, lose teeth or an eye, plus have the tent damaged.

I see so reason to carry a 8 lb / 31 sq.ft. tent. You're better off getting a small silnylon tarp to protect bikes/panniers from rain or view of reflective parts when stealth camping. I accomplish the same thing as the BA WY with a Squall 2 Tarptent and a silnylon tarp - for $300 and 3 lbs. The tarp also serves dual duty as kitchen/dining sun/rain shelter.

I agree that a 3 person tent for 2 people + gear for extended use is not a bad idea, and the extra weight is acceptable for bike touring (as opposed to BP). 31 sf is not 3 person size though - it's 2P+G size (even the BA website classifies it as a 2P tent). You need about 40 sf for a 3P tent, plus a higher roof. You can do better weight-wise and cost-wise than the BA WY tent.
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Old 03-05-12, 03:12 AM
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I have several BA tents and I think they are good but that wasn't the question that was asked. For me, this tent is too heavy for bike touring. Not sure why you want to cover the bike anyway, although there can be legitimate reasons.

Would this bike cover work just as well:

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...2_175310_-1___

I have one that I got on sale from Nashbar for $10 a long time ago and it works well. I don't take it on solo tours, but I have used it on group tours. Cheap and light and useful. Is held on with velcro tabs that fit together under the bike.
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Old 03-05-12, 02:49 PM
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I found a diagram of the tent dimensions on moontrail.com: . 7 feet by 10 feet is a big footprint. Some nights it might be tough to find a large enough open space for that tent. And forget about stealth camping. I'll keep looking at three person tents or maybe something like the Hilleberg Nallo, which is long, but more narrow and still has a sizable vestibule.
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Old 03-07-12, 01:42 PM
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We've used the Jack Wolfskin Worlds End tunnel tent for several years now (details on our site below) and are very happy with it. We will be getting the Jack Wolfskin Tundra III soon for this years tours. You are right about having extra space for cooking in and not feeling crowded in spending days in one during bad weather. They are heavy, our old tent is nearly 6kgs the new one will be nearly 5kgs but do not wory about the weight so much, you get used to it after a few days. Just think of those world travelers going over the Himalayas and the Andes carrying several days of food and water
We believe comfort should come first.
I should mention that we almost always go to organized campings or get a room when we have enough of bad weather.
We've looked at the Hilleberg Nallo but the price just put us off. That is just too much money for a tent and the material is almost see through. We would consider one if going for year or longer tour, a lot of people (world travelers) swear by them.
If you got the money though you can also check out the Hellsport collection (Fjellheimen X-Trem 2 Camp) just as good as the Hilleberg if not beter.

Originally Posted by velo2000 View Post
I found a diagram of the tent dimensions on moontrail.com: . 7 feet by 10 feet is a big footprint. Some nights it might be tough to find a large enough open space for that tent. And forget about stealth camping. I'll keep looking at three person tents or maybe something like the Hilleberg Nallo, which is long, but more narrow and still has a sizable vestibule.
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Old 03-07-12, 02:18 PM
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Touring orthodoxy is to cover the saddle and handlebars at night if it is going to rain.
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Old 03-07-12, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Lake_Tom View Post
Touring orthodoxy is to cover the saddle and handlebars at night if it is going to rain.
Agreed. I just don't get this idea that you have to cover the bike at night or if its raining. The bike's not going to melt. You're going to be riding in the rain if its raining when you wake up in the morning. I've got a little nylon sack that I throw over the leather Brooks saddle, but that's it. There's just no way I'd carry any additional weight to cover a bike, be it a tarp or bigger tent. I've got a 2 person 2.2 lb tent from Tarptent and I have tons of room for one, and cozy for two. I'm to the point that carrying lots of extra weight day after day makes the overall trip less enjoyable.
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Old 03-07-12, 03:22 PM
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I would Never use More than a well secured candle lantern in a tent.
to cook in a Nylon tent is a Bad idea.

maybe a wind break fly will give you the space you want for an Open Flame.
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Old 03-07-12, 03:28 PM
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Originally Posted by VT_Speed_TR View Post
Agreed. I just don't get this idea that you have to cover the bike at night or if its raining. The bike's not going to melt. You're going to be riding in the rain if its raining when you wake up in the morning. I've got a little nylon sack that I throw over the leather Brooks saddle, but that's it. There's just no way I'd carry any additional weight to cover a bike, be it a tarp or bigger tent. I've got a 2 person 2.2 lb tent from Tarptent and I have tons of room for one, and cozy for two. I'm to the point that carrying lots of extra weight day after day makes the overall trip less enjoyable.
the bike won't melt, but it's sure nice to have a lightweight tarp to hang over a picnic table AND bike during stormy weather..... nice for a place to sit out of the rain.

although i haven't found just the right one yet for my style of touring, some tourists like pyramid tents big enough to park both bike and people in. BD megamid out of silnylon would be a good choice or Golite or any other number of pyramid tents out there....lightweight, packable and roomy.

getting on a dry bike in the morning after a nighttime rain storm is actually nicer.
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Old 03-07-12, 07:54 PM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by Bekologist View Post
getting on a dry bike in the morning after a nighttime rain storm is actually nicer.
True, BUT...rolling up a big giant wet tent/tarp is not nice.
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Old 03-08-12, 06:04 AM
  #13  
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id rather be dry cooking dinner and have a dry bike in the morning.

you're going to have wet shelter when it rains, correct.
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Old 03-08-12, 09:36 AM
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I guess it depends. If travelling two up and planning frequent, extended stops to fish, explore or use as destination lodging, I can see it being useful. For short overnight stays on a cycling tour that keeps you on the move - it would probably be more trouble than its worth.

A few personal comments: The fly is open at the bottom therefore offers no bug protection.

The weights given don't include either a footprint or a gear loft, both are recommended for wet weather (which is why you'd buy this anyway) and will add another pound and a half.

All weights are dry weights - stuff weighs more when its wet.

Large, high tents will be subjected to high stresses in storms and other windy conditions and are more difficult to secure. Low structures with domed walls perform better.


But I'd have no issues taking something like this on a late summer or autumn trip where the destination provided large sheltered campsites and I planned on staying for several days or a week at a time.

Last edited by Burton; 03-08-12 at 09:52 AM.
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Old 03-08-12, 09:46 AM
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Originally Posted by velo2000 View Post
I could see the vestibule being handy for cooking in bad weather...
This is a really bad idea unless you really want to experience the fun of a bear encounter. You live in Colorado, you should know better.

My food, cooking gear and the panniers holding them don't go in the tent. I don't even take the clothes I cook in into the tent.
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Old 03-08-12, 03:11 PM
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Maybe I should have titled my post "What's a good tent to help keep my girlfriend happy on a round the world bike trip?"

I know bikes don't melt in the rain, but there are other reasons I'm leaning towards a roomy 3 person tent or a 2 person tent with a large vestibule. Comfort and convenience during a long (1-2 year) trip is at the top of my list. I've already got a Seedhouse SL2 if weight was my main concern (or if I was going solo).

Agreed about using caution in bear country. But I'm dreaming about a round the world trip. There are lots of countries with no large predators, but lots of rain. Cooking in a vestibule would be done with caution and as a last resort, if at all. And that tent wouldn't be used in bear country after that (unless thoroughly deodorized). Cooking under a thin tarp would be better.

Thanks for the feedback so far. Let me know of any other tents I should look at.
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Old 03-08-12, 04:00 PM
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keeping the GF happy? get the tent!

I'd still pack a silnylon tarp for cooking and the picnic tables during the rain. adequately sized ones pack up the size of an small grapefruit.
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Old 03-08-12, 05:28 PM
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My friend and I toured with a Eureka Timberline SQ4XT.. A little on the heavy side, but broken up between two bikes nothing we couldn't handle.. Absolute beast when guyed down.. There is no moving that thing. We were very comfortable using it for three people, it's very spacious for two.. The vestibule stored 8 panniers, two rack packs, shoes, no problem.

http://www.campmor.com/eureka-timber...4xt-tent.shtml
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Old 03-08-12, 07:04 PM
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All tents compromise one thing to better address something else as a priority. Single wall tents are lighter, double walled tents have better insulation, fewer issues with condensation, but are heavier. I've used a variety of really good tents by North Face, Eureka and Browning. I personally like three and four season tents but they tend to be heavier than summer weight stuff. Have travelled with the GF with both a two and three person tent, both with small vestibules. The GF found the two person tent 'cozyier'. But thats not an answer. I tend to be extremely organized, have extremely functional minimized equipment and can make a small space work well. Not everyone can or wants too. Best suggestion is to discuss it with your own GF, set up camp at home (really) and try different things out for a month or so. Best part about that is that setting up camp will be everything it was at home.
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Old 03-08-12, 08:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Bekologist View Post
although i haven't found just the right one yet for my style of touring, some tourists like pyramid tents big enough to park both bike and people in. BD megamid out of silnylon would be a good choice or Golite or any other number of pyramid tents out there....lightweight, packable and roomy.
I have a Black Diamond Megamid and you may get a single bike in there, or 2 if you lay them on top of each other, but then half the space is gone. Then there's the pole in the middle, unless you can find a overhanging tree branch to tie the peak to so you can omit the pole.

As is always the case, everyone has their own perference and there is no right answer/way. Though we try to find the altimate answer on these forums ;-)
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Old 03-09-12, 01:19 AM
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For a round the world tour why not check out the crazyguyonabike journals and see what other couples are using for round the world tours.
Here are a couple other links: www.tour.tk, http://travellingtwo.com/
Beter reviews you wont find anywhere.
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Old 03-09-12, 06:04 AM
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Silnylon tarp for cooking area if you want to stay dry, and to park the bikes under. I treat my tent like a bedroom, it is for sleeping only, not living quarters. Everybody does things a bit differently. The Eureka Timberline is a helluva good tent for the money, tad heavy but hard to beat, we have 4 of them, different sizes and different ages. Oldest one is from the early 1980's.

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Old 03-09-12, 03:37 PM
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That's a really interesting tent as far as the weight.

I have a GoLight 4+ and a Marmot mesh bivy to pitch under it and sleep in. I haven't taken that rig on a tour, but there would be room to park the bike and cook (in inclement weather.)
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Old 03-10-12, 01:12 AM
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I like it for biking. It is not too heavy for touring but it is too heavy for backpacking. People have been packing the BA Seedhouse on the Appalachian Trail for a good while now. Its a bit lighter than the MSR Hubba. BA is a good tent and I like the vestibule area for when you are held up in the rain. I agree about not cooking under the area when in bear country or if you are ever going to use the tent in bear country if you have ever cooked with the tent. If this isn't a concern then when your held up in the rain, cooking sounds like a good past time. I also like that if your in an area with other campers or people in general, you can keep your bicycle under your nose and not have to worry about your bicycle being "out there" where you can't keep it safe. I also like having a place that I can dress or take a sponge bath if I need to in a camping area.

If you just have to go light and want a tent for both hiking and biking then I would go with the Copper Spur UL1. Very nice and light. I think this tent has become more popular than the Seedhouse on the AT?

https://www.bigagnes.com/Products/De...perspurul12012
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