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2005 Cannondale T800 Touring Bike Upgrades

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2005 Cannondale T800 Touring Bike Upgrades

Old 03-06-12, 07:52 AM
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2005 Cannondale T800 Touring Bike Upgrades

If anyone owns a Cannondale T800 touring bike I would like to inquire as what upgrade to better components. More or less I am looking at a complete upgrade for my existing comp[onents that were won the original purchased bike.
New cassette
Chainring
Bbracket
Derailluer
Chain
Tires from initial touring 37 to a 32
Grank set
I would rather get a top components for the upgrade if possible but I do not as of yet know what this bike can have for better componnents.
Thank You
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Old 03-06-12, 08:33 AM
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I've had a couple of Cannondale touring bikes. The nice thing is that the frames are well worth upgrading (for years C'dale used the same touring frame across all their touring models, only changing the components). You should post a detailed list of what you have now, which will help me and others suggest what to upgrade and what to leave. In general, you can upgrade that frame as much as your wallet allows, as it uses components that are industry standard.

The question is, why upgrade? T800s usually had pretty decent components to start with. If they are worn out, then it makes sense. Or, if you are just looking for some more component cachet, I get that, too. But you should identify the reasons behind your upgrade plan if you want suggestions.

Here's the way I built-up my newish Co-Motion Nor'wester Co-Pilot. I switched over many of the components from my Cannondale touring bike when I got the new frame (the only reason I changed frames was I wanted S&S couplers). With few exceptions, most parts were sourced from Ebay or a local swap meet (T-town rules!) for reasonable prices.

Drivetrain: XTR rear derailleur, Dura-Ace triple FD, Ultegra STI levers, XT 9-speed cassette 11-32
Cranks: TA Carmina crankarms with 110/74 spider, 50-36-24 TA rings (previously I ran a Sugino crank with similar size chainrings)
BB: Phil Wood titanium square taper
Seatpost/stem: Thomson Elite
Wheels: Ultegra hubs on Velocity Aerohead rims, 36 spoke f/r (I'm also planning on building up a more heavy duty set of wheels for heavily loaded touring, probably converting a set of XT hubs to 130mm rear spacing)
Tires are Continental Ultra Gatorskin 700x32
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Old 03-06-12, 08:54 AM
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I don't own a Cannondale but I'd start with replacing something because it's worn or want a different function/position/size. "top grade" is pretty much anything mid-priced. Top cost can easily cost more than the bike is worth.
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Old 03-06-12, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by angushiro
If anyone owns a Cannondale T800 touring bike I would like to inquire as what upgrade to better components. More or less I am looking at a complete upgrade for my existing comp[onents that were won the original purchased bike.
New cassette
Chainring
Bbracket
Derailluer
Chain
Tires from initial touring 37 to a 32
Grank set
I would rather get a top components for the upgrade if possible but I do not as of yet know what this bike can have for better componnents.
Thank You
The original parts on the Cannondale are good as is. The drivetrain is solid and very workable. The Tiagra shift levers aren't fancy but they are good performers. The Tiagra front derailer is the best triple derailer you can find and is far superior to it's more expensive brothers in the Shimano line. About the only thing I'd change in the drivetrain is the inner chainwheel from a 26 to a 22.

The wheels on the bike are good while the hubs are outstanding. If I were to change anything on the wheels, it would be the spokes from straight gauge DT (which are pretty good) to DT Alpine III (which are way better for touring). The tires, if they are in good shape, are good touring tires.

Ride the bike as is...with the inner ring change...and know that you have one of the two best production touring bikes around. You've got a really good frame and it's worth good components but what it has right now is very nice.
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Old 03-06-12, 11:14 AM
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angushiro, I'm a long time Cannondale road rider and the one model they were best at was the touring bikes, both in manufacture and component specification. I essentially agree with cyccommute, if something is worn it then becomes considered for an update. If this is a new-to-you bike a general over all service maybe all that's needed.

Brad
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Old 03-06-12, 11:55 AM
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Yes quite right I do get the tempo of all the reply's and I really thank all of you. Yes I do have some worn cogs within the front chain ring. The chain also should be replaced due to the grinding from the chain ring being alittle defective. But I agree with staying with the same components only to replace them with new ones. I am very grateful for this exceptional forum esp for all the knowledge and help>
Thank you for the support>
Angushiro..
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Old 03-06-12, 01:39 PM
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If you want to get back to the new car smell I would replace all gears, front and back new chainrings and cassettes. Get a new chain. I would look into cassettes like the CS925 Cyclotouriste 14:

sheldonbrown.com/harris/k7.html

This gives a smoother range with minimal impact on the top end. There are lots of threads around here with discussions of gearing.


I wouldn't be in a hurry to replace the cranks and bottom bracket, particularly if they are serviceable (cranks come out and the BB is removeable). Crank/BB problems are one of the few things it is heavy to carry decent tools for.

One of the cheap-out things that is common on bikes in the T800 price range are the brakes. This is something to just keep an eye on. Cheap brakes are not necessarily unsafe brakes, but for better function and look it is usually the first thing I change out. One has to be careful about this because different looks/geometries are often not effective. But there are some other things one can buy into, including easier maintenance with fewer tools.

On a second hand bike you would certainly want a new seat. But I gather you bought this one? You could still go to a brooks.

All new cables, housings, etc...

Wheels are one place one can upgrade, without any concerns about there not being something sufficiently expensive available, . purely on need I would wait until the rims show you the way. If you have spokes that haven't broken in 7 years, you should treasure them. Properly mounted and broken in spokes can run for hundreds of thousands of miles, and do not need replacement, in fact should be switched into the new rims, except that today a lot of bicycle shops will not do it since they don't know the history of the spokes... There is no practical advantage to the various formats, what matters is build, and that all the components fit each other because they don't always. On older wheels that have seen use, you can assume good component matching. Also, with older hubs, pre-9 speed, you may have an intolerantly stronger rear wheel.

I would probably not actually replace bars, but they are lots of luscious choices out there, and they are an aluminum component being used in a rather stressful way. So you can feel good about it if you want an excuse.

New tape.

Last edited by MassiveD; 03-06-12 at 01:50 PM.
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Old 03-06-12, 05:44 PM
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+1 with Cyccommute's post.

The only things I have changed on my wife's T800 are the chainrings and a bottom bracket. I replaced the 48/36/26 rings with a set of 44/32/22 (11-34 cassette) to provide a better low end. The bottom bracket is the one thing that actually needed changing. She rode it across the U.S., a major portion of the Pacific Coast route, and did several shorter tours on it without any problems. She has also commuted on it for about 5 years- much harder on the bike than touring!

It is a nice, well built bike.

Adjust the gearing to suit you, and then replace as needed. I do agree on going with the lighter 32mm tires. We have done a lot of touring on 28mm tires, but switched to "bigger" tires last year before starting on a 3 month fully loaded ride.--32mm

Last edited by Doug64; 03-06-12 at 05:49 PM.
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Old 03-06-12, 06:24 PM
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Here's a link to Cannondale's 2005 catalog. You can see how they equipped to T2000 which had the higher end components. https://web.archive.org/web/200703282...a/cats/TO.html
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Old 03-07-12, 09:48 AM
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I have a 2002 T800. The only thing I've done so far is add fenders, a Tubus rack, a Brooks saddle (Pro model), and switched the seatpost to an adjustable hydraulic to soften the bumps since the bike frame is aluminum.
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