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700c tires for: rider=145lbs; bike=24lbs; gear~30lbs ????

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700c tires for: rider=145lbs; bike=24lbs; gear~30lbs ????

Old 06-12-12, 06:54 PM
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700c tires for: rider=145lbs; bike=24lbs; gear~30lbs ????

I am trying to figure out what type of tires to buy for my first tour, which is coming up fast.

The bike is a bianchi volpe and it weighs about 24lbs I think.

I weigh 145 lbs.

I don't know what the total weight of my gear will be, I'm still purchasing but the trip is for 1 week and I'll be carrying nearly all my food. No tent; I'm using a lightweight Hennessy Hammock.

I don't expect to bike on any trails or go offroad at all really. It should be all pavement.

I've always commuted on a fast road bike and the tires I have now, 32c with some knobage, feel slow and spongy? Feels funny on turns. But I don't mind them too much.

Suggestions? Can I get narrower tires? Will I regret it? Is 32 pretty standard?

Thanks
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Old 06-12-12, 07:40 PM
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when I was your size carrying 15lbs I rode on 28mm tires front and rear, later tours with a bit more weight used 32mm on the rear. You don't need "knobbage" on road tires. The model of tire matters as much as tire size, and not all tires of the same written dimension have the same measured dimension. Narrower tires than your existing 32mm knobbage tires won't matter as much as getting tires without knobbage if you like to lean over hard in turns. Knobbage is for softer surfaces than pavement.

Panaracer Ribmo, Continental Sport Contact, Schwalbe Supreme, Panaracer T-Serv, are decent road tires.
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Old 06-12-12, 10:14 PM
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+1 with LeeG's assessment.

I weigh 150, have a Volpe, and carry about 35 pounds. I've done quite a bit of touring with it. One 3700 mile trip and several shorter tours, all with 28mm Continental Ultra gatorskins. Last year I used 32mm Schawlbe Marathons on a LHT, because of the unknowns in last summer's tour. I just set up 2 bikes today with 28mm Conti's for our daughters to use on a short tour next month.

When I load up my bike, any liveliness the tires may have had before is quickly neutralized by the weight. I would really like to try the 32mm Gatorskins which were not available in the U.S. until just recently. I think they would be a good compromise between the relatively heavy Schwalbe 32mm Marathon and the light weight 28mm Continental Ultra gatorskins.

On tour with 28mm tires.
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Old 06-12-12, 10:14 PM
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Knobage, i love that.
Ribbing aside, at same weight or less than you, but more load (maybe 40lbs) I used 28.slicks. you could easily use 32s, but slickish, and you'd feel a big diff in ride feel, especially in cornering.
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Old 06-13-12, 06:17 AM
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I took a 2-day trip last weekend with about 30 lbs of gear on my touring bike with Conti GP 4 Season 700x28 tires and they performed great. However, I plan to put some Vittoria Randonneur Hyper 32s on the bike sooner or later. They are a little heavier than the GP 4 Seasons (and about same weight as Gatorskin 32s) but get excellent reviews for their durability, ride quality and low rolling resistance. If you find some 32s that have folding beads (like the Hypers), they should be reasonably light weight and still provide good ride quality and durability.
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Old 06-13-12, 09:27 AM
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32 wide is fine but it's the knobby tread that is slowing .. frequent punctures is also slowing
so look for a slickish tire with a puncture resistant tread band. kevlar belt.
Trek-trager 'hard case' one of that sort. Schwalbe makes some too.

Continental travel contact brings the gator skin feature,Kevlar belt,
into a 37-622 tire , intended for adventure touring

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Old 06-13-12, 12:40 PM
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Since I weigh nearly twice as much as you, I probably have different tire requirements. At my weight I really like 700x37c tires. These days it is Vittoria Randonneur Hyper and Conti SportContact. You could probably use 32s with no problem. The real value of the wider tires is going over bumps like rail road tracks while loaded. The bike doesn’t do the kind of pitching over obstacles loaded down that it does unloaded. It becomes too easy to get pinch flats or damaged rims. It also turns out that fatter, fast tires like the Hyper and Sport Contact are really pretty fast. They also do fine in the rain. The Contis are wire bead and a pain to fold to carry as a spare, but the Hypers are Kevlar bead and fold up very nicely. You may not feel you need a spare for a 1 week trip, but if you can carry the extra weight, it might not be a bad idea.
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Old 06-13-12, 08:46 PM
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I also should have noted that I commute to work via bike, often with little-to-no weight and I like to feel speedy when going through the city. So, maybe 28 slicks (knobbage-less for the lay reader) would work all the way around? Are pinch-flats going to be a major concern as ClemY noted? Thanks to all for the advice.
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Old 06-13-12, 09:55 PM
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Are pinch-flats going to be a major concern as ClemY noted?
Pinch flats could be a problem if tire pressure is too low. I usually run my 28mm Continental Gatorskins at 100 psi, which is still below the maximum. I've not had a problem with pinch flats, but the 32mm are definitely more comfortable. Like most other things on a bike tire selection is always a compromise.
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Old 06-14-12, 08:20 AM
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re pinch flats, to give you my real world experience with 28s. Here in Montreal roads are often rather rough, so running 100-110 is too harsh. I weigh 140 and even with a bit of stuff on the bike (5-10lbs) I now use pressures of 85-90 front , 90-95 rear and it really does take the edge of the rough stuff. This is with either gatorskins or Specialized All-Conditions (a slickish similar to the gatorskins) and I have never had a pinch flat.

**caveat- how you ride is the kicker here, I always watch the surface, and unload wheels if I have to hit a pothole or edge or whatever. Some riders just blithely pedal along and so all their weight on the rear wheel can slam into a sharp edged pothole or whatever. Not sure of the term, but some riders ride "heavy" and some "light", and how you go over stuff is a big factor in how hard things are on a tire at a given pressure, and of course, rider weight.

lower pressures like I use also has a benefit in cornering, especially on rougher pavement, as the sidewall of the tire can flex and do its job as suspension mid corner if it is bumpy. I notice a real diff in cornering confidence at these pressures as opposed to at max. as the bike doesnt get bounced up as much and tire/road contact is maintained better. Think of downhill skiing, using your legs as suspension properly and keeping ski/snow contact even and steady, makes all the diff in maintaining control and keeping momentum up. With modern day F1 cars, tire pressure and hence sidewall movement is a big big part of the suspension behaviour for the car (even though they have suspension).

I used to always keep my tires at max as indicated on sidewall, as I was wary of pinchflats (which ive never had in my life, then or now) but for unloaded riding, you can easily bring it down gradually and see how it feels. I once raced motorcycles a bit on pavement tracks, so that experience helps me in terms of "feeling" what a tire is doing under me, but one can easily try diff bicycle tire pressures in a controlled environment and note how a given pressure feels like, from a comfort angle as well as how it feels in terms of cornering. You will begin to learn what pressures feel less harsh, and perhaps if you reduce in small amounts, begin to feel at what point the tire is moving around too much, either in a corner or over bumps.

I think in general, you dont want to be too low, but its safe to say that bringing it down from 110 to 100 or less will be okay--I say this again, as a 140 pounder, so someone 60 or 80 lbs more than me will have to come to his or her own conclusions and feel of their bike.

have fun experimenting, and if you dont have one, get a floor pump, its so easy to pump up and see pressures (in my case, with so many bikes in the family, it was great to finally have one and to quickly top up and check various tires from various family members bikes-who never ever think about their tires....)
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Old 06-14-12, 08:55 AM
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Originally Posted by loubikes
Are pinch-flats going to be a major concern as ClemY noted?
No, unless you run too low of a pressure. I have used 28mm gatorskins with 210 pounds of me, 30 pounds of bike and 30 pounds of gear with no problems. I have since used 23mm gatorskins and later 25 mm ones with 210 pounds of me, 24 pounds or bike, and 14 pounds of gear plus a few pounds of food and water. Not a single pinch flat was experienced with any of those combinations and all combinations were used for at least 1000 miles, with two used much more.

I did find the 23mm gatorskins to have a really annoying buzz when on chip seal, that was much improved with the 25mm ones. Obviously it was even less of an issue with the 28's and would be less so yet with 32's.
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Old 06-14-12, 08:59 AM
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hi there staehpj (you know, each time I have to look up how to spell your darn name out ;-)

what pressures do you use for the examples above, just curious and would reference it to a friend who is about that weight.
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Old 06-14-12, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by djb
hi there staehpj (you know, each time I have to look up how to spell your darn name out ;-)

what pressures do you use for the examples above, just curious and would reference it to a friend who is about that weight.
I tend to vary the pressure a bit depending on what the roads are like where I am touring and how lazy I am about topping them up. I have not been carrying a gauge so I may not be completely accurate, but...
  • 23mm gatorskins with 210 pounds of me, 24 pounds or bike, and 14 pounds of gear - 110 psi on mostly smooth roads and 90-100 when there was a lot of chipseal roads or otherwise rough roads
  • 25mm gatorskins with 210 pounds of me, 24 pounds or bike, and 14 pounds of gear- 105 psi on mostly smooth roads and 85-95 when there was a lot of chipseal roads or otherwise rough roads
  • 28mm gatorskins with 210 pounds of me, 30 pounds of bike and 30 pounds of gear - probably 90 psi most of the time

Not that those numbers are necessarily optimum, they are just what I used.
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Old 06-14-12, 09:30 AM
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gracias,

for the 28s, that supports my feeling that under 90 is ok for me sometimes, Ive run less and its been ok, but didnt always like how it felt that the front "moved around" a bit under fast cornering.
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Old 06-14-12, 11:34 AM
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djb
I used to always keep my tires at max as indicated on sidewall, as I was wary of pinchflats (which ive never had in my life, then or now) but for unloaded riding, you can easily bring it down gradually and see how it feels.
This is a good idea, and I'm about to try this with my 28mm's today on a grocery excursion. You are correct that at 100 psi the ride is harsh. So I'll start by going down 5 psi or so (my pump is not that accurate), and work down to 90 psi. Where you speaking of a loaded or unloaded bike? From Pete's experience, it looks like even with a loaded bike 90 psi is OK.

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Old 06-14-12, 07:44 PM
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Doug, I've been using the 28s at these pressures (ish, as Pete says, it can vary and if not checked, is probably less than I think) since last summer or more, and at times I have nothing on the bike, and others I have maybe 10, 15 or 20 lbs on the rear. So not loaded per say, but a bit. I guess as I'm light, the extra weight doesnt really make a big difference.
With little or less stuff on, I really do notice the positives, and as I said, especially in overall taking the edge off the harshness, and in downhill turns I often go around at 40, 50k where the bumps are handled so much better and the bike isnt unsettled so much by them.
On my other bike, my old mtn bike with 1.5 marathons (regular ones) on it, Ive been using about 60 front, 65 rear, and thats been with up to 30lbs on the rear (and a lightly filled handlebar bag). All last fall and this spring I was riding it a lot with 20-30lbs in the two rear panniers to get me ready for a planned trip that I only did this May, and having those pressures worked great for my trip.
During the trip, I rode on fairly steep paved mtn roads, and had a blast going down curvy roads at up to 70k or 45mph, and was always confident in the handling. That bike has a harsh rear end, and lowering pressures last year very much helped with its comfort (also, the previous tires that were on it were older Armadillos, that I found harsh overall, sidewall very stiff and not flexible--the Marathons are better in that respect)
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Old 06-14-12, 08:03 PM
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Is this considered a slick tire?

https://www.rei.com/product/709112/vi...700-x-28-32-35
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Old 06-14-12, 08:33 PM
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lou, not really.
This is:
https://www.conti-online.com/generato...orskin_en.html

question, why'd you ask?
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Old 06-14-12, 08:39 PM
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If you're using WTB Allterrainasaurus tires like my Volpe came with, that is probably the problem. They just feel really sluggish. I have used 700x32 Schwalbe Marathon and Marathon Plus, and also a Continental Contact in 700x37, and they're all much better. They all roll faster, corner better, and are more flat-resistant to boot.
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Old 06-16-12, 08:25 AM
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question, why'd you ask?
Well, I thought I'd like to use slicks since they are suppose to be faster on pavement. (Right?) I plan to tour on pavement and I commute through the city, so I was thinking slicks would be the best choice.
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Old 06-16-12, 08:27 AM
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Spld cyclist, I do in fact have the WTB Allterrainasaurus.
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Old 06-16-12, 08:30 AM
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I've used Marathon Plus in 700x32 on a tour, with about 230-240 pounds of me, the bike (Specialized Tricross) probably about 20 pounds (?) and 30-odd pounds of stuff. It was all on the road but some of the surfaces left a bit to be desired.
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Old 06-16-12, 10:36 AM
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Originally Posted by loubikes
Well, I thought I'd like to use slicks since they are suppose to be faster on pavement. (Right?) I plan to tour on pavement and I commute through the city, so I was thinking slicks would be the best choice.
I've used slicks on my 700 wheeled bikes, as well as on my 26in bike. That said, since last season on my mtn bike I've used schwalbe marathon which have very similar tread to the tires you showed. I commute and have lightly toured with it, and am very happy with these types of tires. I used to think slicks were a lot better but for the type of riding you want to do, those tires would be perfectly fine in my opinion (although I haven't used them personally)
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Old 06-16-12, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by loubikes
I am trying to figure out what type of tires to buy for my first tour, which is coming up fast.

The bike is a bianchi volpe and it weighs about 24lbs I think.

I weigh 145 lbs.

I don't know what the total weight of my gear will be, I'm still purchasing but the trip is for 1 week and I'll be carrying nearly all my food. No tent; I'm using a lightweight Hennessy Hammock.

I don't expect to bike on any trails or go offroad at all really. It should be all pavement.

I've always commuted on a fast road bike and the tires I have now, 32c with some knobage, feel slow and spongy? Feels funny on turns. But I don't mind them too much.

Suggestions? Can I get narrower tires? Will I regret it? Is 32 pretty standard?
knobbies
Thanks
Don't get narrower tires! Narrow tires has a higher resistance than wider tires and this had been proven scientifically and by Jan Heine. He was also instrumental in convincing the pro racing community to switch from narrow 20c tires now to 25c and running them with lower pressure!! But wider tires are not the secret weapon. Wider tires with supple casings is the ticket to rolling faster and having less puncture thanks to lower tire pressure due to the pneumatic effect -- enveloping the debris rather than hitting dead on. I'm just about your weight and tour with your same weight setup.

With tires, just go for the best and I mean with Schawlbe wide tires. You don't need knobbies on the road or on the trails either except for tough single tracks -- you would be riding a mountain bike if you do anyhow!
Also, puncture resistance tires rolls slower and harsher due to the tougher puncture casings. However, there are tires out of that deal with these issues well.

So how wide is best? It is best to accommodate the intended load and in your case, 700x35c smooth thread pumped up to the correct pressure and then do nothing. Even loaded, you should not need to add more air to counteract the sag from the additional weight like you would with narrower 28 or 32c tires. A smooth rolling properly inflated expensive Marathon Supreme 700x35c rolls better downhill on my Masi Speciale CX than my Vittoria 23c on my carbon bike pumped out to a higher PSI I found.

In my experience, I run the correct tire width and do not increase tire pressure to accommodate an increase load to give the best riding performance. By increasing tire pressure, what's you are doing is exactly the same as you're running a narrow tire with higher pressure and loosing the pneumatic advantage.

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Old 06-16-12, 04:19 PM
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Use the tires your running, they will be fine.
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