Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Light or Ultralight Frying Options?

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Light or Ultralight Frying Options?

Old 02-08-13, 09:09 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,888
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1257 Post(s)
Liked 768 Times in 568 Posts
Light or Ultralight Frying Options?

OK, so the long cast iron thread is winding down or maybe done. For a change of gears I thought I would ask about what lighter options folks used to fry with on tour.

I'll start it off with a few observations.
  1. Obviously just not taking anything to fry with is the lightest answer. This is what I have generally done thus far and expect to do on most trips in the future.
  2. Various burners are easier or more difficult to fry with, but it can be managed with most. I like the adjustability of my canister stove, but I can manage to fry with my pop can stove.
  3. It seems like good frying kind of requires some weight in excess of that of an ultralight pan. Any truly light pan I have tried was pretty miserable to fry with. I have managed to fry things with the fry pan lid on some pots, but they were all pretty far from ideal.
  4. I have a stainless MSR fry pan with aluminum bonded to the bottom that fries pretty well. It is a 7.5" pan and weighs 11 ounces including the handle (10.2 oz without the handle). So far this is the best compromise I have found if I really want to be able to fry, but it weighs as much as my entire UL cooking/eating setup including stove, pot stand, windscreen, pot, utensils, cup, and all.

So what if anything do you use? How well does it work? What does it weigh?

To be honest it is a backpacking trip rather than a bike tour that got me thinking about this. I am planning a JMT hike and expect to carry my 3.6 ounce Tenkara fly rod along with another 2 or 3 ounces of fishing gear. I hope the fishing is good enough that I can extend my trip by stretching the food I carry over more days. I will carry enough food to get there without, but if I catch enough fish may add a day or two.
I can poach fish or roast them over a fire on a forked stick, but fried fish are really yummy and fried potato cakes go great with that (tasty fried potato cakes can be made with instant mashed potatoes and freeze dried onions or a fresh onion).

I figure that I can take the Tenkara rod and the fry pan and still have a base gear weight of 8 pounds in my otherwise minimal configuration and 11 lb 8 oz with the bigger pack, heavier stove (canister), and bear canister that I'll need for the JMT.
staehpj1 is online now  
Old 02-08-13, 09:30 AM
  #2  
Crawler
 
linus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: OH~ CANADA
Posts: 1,410
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 211 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 15 Posts
I use Snowpeak Trek Titanium Plate. Less than 2oz. Campfire safe too.
linus is offline  
Old 02-08-13, 12:55 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Western Flyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 505

Bikes: Cannondale Topstone gravel bike Dahon MU folder w/2x8 speed internal drive train

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by linus
I use Snowpeak Trek Titanium Plate. Less than 2oz. Campfire safe too.
That's good to hear. What stove(s) have you used with it?
__________________
On a trip you've got worry as a companion, for you're always concerned about what happens next and sticking to an itinerary. . . . on a journey you never have to worry. Something always happens next.

- Gordon Hempton: One Square inch of Silence
Western Flyer is offline  
Old 02-08-13, 01:08 PM
  #4  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,357 Times in 863 Posts
I like the simmer valve on the MSR Dragonfly & it runs fine of Unleaded Motor Petrol.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 02-08-13, 01:49 PM
  #5  
Certified Bike Brat
 
Burton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 4,251
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Pretty hard to fit anything legal to keep into any frying pan designed for backpacking - most are pretty small.
A totally different approach if you're planning on a campfire anyway is to just clean the fish, stuff them with whatever (butter/tomatoes/mushrooms/onions) wrap them in aluminum foil and just toss 'em in the fire.

Yeah - thats not exactly a non-stick approach, so when you unwrap the fish, the skin sticks to the foil and seperates easily, and if properly cooked, the complete backbone can be lifted right out in one piece.

Fried potatoes doen't make out nearly as well and a small frypan and oil is a better approach. Unless you want to pack in some baking potatoes and do the foil thing with those too. Does make for a lighter trip back out (except for the full tummy).
Burton is offline  
Old 02-08-13, 02:28 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
zeppinger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,016

Bikes: Giant FCR3, Surly LHT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by linus
I use Snowpeak Trek Titanium Plate. Less than 2oz. Campfire safe too.
This sounds like a neat idea since my problem with most fry pans is that they are too small in diameter. However, how do you hold the plate still while you are flipping the food if there is no handle?

I have a Trangia UL27 that fries fantastically but I dont take it with me often because of the over all weight of the kit. I have no found a good pot/pan combo that works as well but really like HA Aluminum for frying, over TI. I just cant find a HA Aluminum set with a large diameter pan/lid.
zeppinger is offline  
Old 02-08-13, 03:51 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,888
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1257 Post(s)
Liked 768 Times in 568 Posts
Originally Posted by Burton
Pretty hard to fit anything legal to keep into any frying pan designed for backpacking - most are pretty small.
A totally different approach if you're planning on a campfire anyway is to just clean the fish, stuff them with whatever (butter/tomatoes/mushrooms/onions) wrap them in aluminum foil and just toss 'em in the fire.

Yeah - thats not exactly a non-stick approach, so when you unwrap the fish, the skin sticks to the foil and seperates easily, and if properly cooked, the complete backbone can be lifted right out in one piece.

Fried potatoes doen't make out nearly as well and a small frypan and oil is a better approach. Unless you want to pack in some baking potatoes and do the foil thing with those too. Does make for a lighter trip back out (except for the full tummy).
Thanks for all of that. I am not sure how likely it is that many of the trout will be too big to fit in most pans and as far as I know there isn't a minimum legal size there. It sounds, from what I have read, like most of the fish are under 10" with chances for larger fish in a few areas. I know that the biggest fish caught by one guy who fished a lot on a JMT thru hike was 13". Some of the streams are apparently loaded with 9" brookies. I'd be delighted to eat some of them and am sure they will fit in even a very small pan once the head and tail are off.
staehpj1 is online now  
Old 02-08-13, 03:56 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,888
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1257 Post(s)
Liked 768 Times in 568 Posts
Originally Posted by linus
I use Snowpeak Trek Titanium Plate. Less than 2oz. Campfire safe too.
The price isn't too bad so I may give one a go and see how it works out. I'd like to be wrong, but I am a bit skeptical about how well thin ti will fry. Care to comment further on that?
staehpj1 is online now  
Old 02-08-13, 07:23 PM
  #9  
Certified Bike Brat
 
Burton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 4,251
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by staehpj1
Thanks for all of that. I am not sure how likely it is that many of the trout will be too big to fit in most pans and as far as I know there isn't a minimum legal size there. It sounds, from what I have read, like most of the fish are under 10" with chances for larger fish in a few areas. I know that the biggest fish caught by one guy who fished a lot on a JMT thru hike was 13". Some of the streams are apparently loaded with 9" brookies. I'd be delighted to eat some of them and am sure they will fit in even a very small pan once the head and tail are off.
LOL - but you mentioned fly fishing! Figured you'd be after salmon or trout in rivers. You're talking to guy who grew up in Nova Scotia. No-one I know goes fly fishing for brookies - in fact - you don't even need a rod! If they're hungry they'll bite and if they're not the best equipment won't interest them.

Never bothered to cut off the head or tail before cooking those. I'd say bring the frying pan - spring is when they should be biting.
Burton is offline  
Old 02-08-13, 09:47 PM
  #10  
Crawler
 
linus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: OH~ CANADA
Posts: 1,410
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 211 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by Western Flyer
That's good to hear. What stove(s) have you used with it?
So far I've used with Snowpeak GS-100 and Litemax Ti stoves. I haven't had a chance to use it with my newest stove(Primus Omni Ti), but I can't see why it won't.
linus is offline  
Old 02-08-13, 09:55 PM
  #11  
Crawler
 
linus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: OH~ CANADA
Posts: 1,410
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 211 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by zeppinger
This sounds like a neat idea since my problem with most fry pans is that they are too small in diameter. However, how do you hold the plate still while you are flipping the food if there is no handle?

I have a Trangia UL27 that fries fantastically but I dont take it with me often because of the over all weight of the kit. I have no found a good pot/pan combo that works as well but really like HA Aluminum for frying, over TI. I just cant find a HA Aluminum set with a large diameter pan/lid.
I don't use bear aluminium cookwares. They are really bad for you. Also the coated pans are really bad when used on campfire. Ti doesn't cook evenly, but I'll take that over chemicals in my food.
linus is offline  
Old 02-08-13, 10:02 PM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Ekdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Seville, Spain
Posts: 4,403

Bikes: Brompton M6R, mountain bikes, Circe Omnis+ tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 146 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by staehpj1
I'd be delighted to eat some of them and am sure they will fit in even a very small pan once the head and tail are off.
If not, just cut in half.
Ekdog is offline  
Old 02-08-13, 10:40 PM
  #13  
Crawler
 
linus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: OH~ CANADA
Posts: 1,410
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 211 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by staehpj1
The price isn't too bad so I may give one a go and see how it works out. I'd like to be wrong, but I am a bit skeptical about how well thin ti will fry. Care to comment further on that?
You have to be careful not to burn your food. Ti won't cook evenly so you need to cook slowly.

I use Ti because I don't want any chemicals in my food. Cooking on bear aluminium cookware or high temperature cooking on PTFE coated cookware is no no for me.

When you need to clean up on the road, use sand and dirt. Also if you can't get rid of black gunk from campfire, use pumice cleaner and steel wool after your trip. I also use the plate when I have to dig a potty hole when I'm on backpacking trips. (UL backpacker so no shovel for me)

Try that and see if you like it. It's not for everyone, but definitely worth considering. Good luck.
linus is offline  
Old 02-09-13, 06:08 AM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 11,309

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3509 Post(s)
Liked 1,492 Times in 1,165 Posts
I described the non-stick aluminum pan I use in the cast iron discussion here:
https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...1#post15140522

I described a 10 inch pan, not sure if you want one that big. I think the brand was Tramontina, I think I paid $10 on sale.

I do not fish but years ago I went backpacking with a trout fisherman that threw back the big ones because he said that if you cut the head off, they curl in the pan and do not cook evenly. Thus any fish longer than the pan went back into the lake. If that would be a consideration for you, how big are the fish where you are going?

If I am carrying a fry pan, I carry a liquid fuel stove. If I am going light and skip the fry pan, I use a canister stove for lighter weight. I have never used an alcohol stove.

I am surprised that this thread has not yet become a accusatory debate of theoretical thermodynamics like the cast iron one did. I was wondering when someone would suggest cooking by using the heat from a rather heated discussion.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Old 02-09-13, 07:03 AM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Posts: 12,948
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
I have used my Trangia 27 to fry a small beef steak. It makes a real mess and takes ages to clean but the result was pretty tasty.
My usual meal involves frying up onions and stuff in the bottom of the pan, then adding other stuff,eg rice and liquid . This cleans up the pan as it cooks.
Can you fillet larger salmon into pan-sized chunks? You need to carry a long, thin, sharp knife to filet well.
MichaelW is offline  
Old 02-09-13, 07:59 AM
  #16  
Lentement mais sûrement
 
Erick L's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Montréal
Posts: 2,253
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
I've used the pan that came with a GSI Extreme cookset. It's hard anodized alu. Works well and is durable. I like it more than my regular home frying pans. I'd use it more if it were bigger. I use the pots as regular kitchen pots. GSI makes good stuff at a decent price.
Erick L is offline  
Old 02-09-13, 10:12 AM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
iforgotmename's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 1,501
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
While not a camping specific pan I like my Jacob Bromwell 6 inch pan. On my crude kitchen scale it weighs in at about 6 oz. I like the fact that it is handcrafted, made in the USA, steel and easily seasoned to a great non stick finish.

I have yet to take it out but it does a great job cooking eggs on my home stove...so much that I may have to buy another as my wife has become attached to that little pan.

https://www.amazon.com/Jacob-Bromwell.../dp/B006UD7ZG8
iforgotmename is offline  
Old 02-09-13, 11:32 AM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
Western Flyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 505

Bikes: Cannondale Topstone gravel bike Dahon MU folder w/2x8 speed internal drive train

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
This brings us back to cast iron. Snow Peak the innovators of ultra- lightweight camp cookware has just the ticket -- a trimmed down oval dutch oven and at only six pounds it's a mere feather in your pannier compared to it full size cousins

Of course you could breakout the anvil and forge and hammer and pound out your own casserole de poissons out of a flat sheet of titanium. Or dispense with the pan altogether and roast you catch First Nation style in a loose basket of green cedar branches. I was thinking of using titanium tent pegs to skewer the fish for cooking, but it might invite Yosemite's notorious bears to root up your tent in the middle of the night.
__________________
On a trip you've got worry as a companion, for you're always concerned about what happens next and sticking to an itinerary. . . . on a journey you never have to worry. Something always happens next.

- Gordon Hempton: One Square inch of Silence
Western Flyer is offline  
Old 02-09-13, 05:50 PM
  #19  
Certified Bike Brat
 
Burton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 4,251
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Western Flyer
This brings us back to cast iron. Snow Peak the innovators of ultra- lightweight camp cookware has just the ticket -- a trimmed down oval dutch oven and at only six pounds it's a mere feather in your pannier compared to it full size cousins

Of course you could breakout the anvil and forge and hammer and pound out your own casserole de poissons out of a flat sheet of titanium. Or dispense with the pan altogether and roast you catch First Nation style in a loose basket of green cedar branches. I was thinking of using titanium tent pegs to skewer the fish for cooking, but it might invite Yosemite's notorious bears to root up your tent in the middle of the night.
Yikes! Snow Peak is now marketing cast iron********** Since Dutch ovens are usually intended to be covered with coals and heated from all directions - an alternate strategy might be to bring half and cover with tin-foil. Half the weight but fine for frying.

But that's still heavier than what I'm using myself. Alternatively, Lodge makes cast iron oven-to-table items designed for individual servings that weigh less than that.
Burton is offline  
Old 02-10-13, 11:20 AM
  #20  
Member
 
el Chilly Willy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: key weird, conch republic
Posts: 28

Bikes: 1989 trek 660, my chilly conch cruiser, blacked out brakeless fixie, gunnar crosshairs, 1964 raleight sports, LHT, bumblebee bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
msr wind pro stove and a non stick coated titanium pot. works great.
standard meal starts with olive oil and garlic. throw in veggies. spice to taste. toss in quinoa. then water. yum!!!
i have even made hamburgers in the pot!
stove fits in pot.
i am not sure why/how people have trouble with ti. perhaps using a stove with an adjustable flame has been my key?
eat well, pedal better!

(tried to post a burger pic but having issues)
el Chilly Willy is offline  
Old 02-10-13, 12:00 PM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: City of Brotherly Love
Posts: 1,562

Bikes: Raleigh Companion, Nashbar Touring, Novara DiVano, Trek FX 7.1, Giant Upland

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
When it comes to frying, I limit myself to stir-frying. In the past I use an REI Ti-Ware cookware set on an MSR Whisperlite International which requires constant supervision.
Bezalel is offline  
Old 02-10-13, 01:32 PM
  #22  
Used to be fast
 
surfjimc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: So Cal
Posts: 580

Bikes: 85 Specialized Expedition, 07 Motobecane Immortal Spirit built up with Dura ace and Mavic Ksyriums, '85 Bianchi Track Bike, '90 Fisher Procaliber, '96 Landshark TwinDirt Shark Tandem, '88 Curtlo

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by staehpj1
Thanks for all of that. I am not sure how likely it is that many of the trout will be too big to fit in most pans and as far as I know there isn't a minimum legal size there.
Legal limit for trout here in CA is 6". Lots of Brookies to find along your route. It's been a pretty good snow year, so if you are leaving for a Spring trip you will run into quite a bit of snow on the passes.
surfjimc is offline  
Old 02-10-13, 04:02 PM
  #23  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 11,888
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1257 Post(s)
Liked 768 Times in 568 Posts
Originally Posted by surfjimc
Legal limit for trout here in CA is 6". Lots of Brookies to find along your route. It's been a pretty good snow year, so if you are leaving for a Spring trip you will run into quite a bit of snow on the passes.
Starting August 1
staehpj1 is online now  
Old 02-10-13, 04:21 PM
  #24  
Certified Bike Brat
 
Burton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 4,251
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by staehpj1
Starting August 1
OK - you might want to check local regulations. Fishing can be restricted here in parts of Canada in August / September.
Burton is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
nun
Touring
845
11-30-21 10:54 AM
Biketouringhobo
Touring
23
09-10-15 03:54 AM
mdilthey
Touring
58
11-07-13 02:58 AM
nun
Touring
6
03-06-11 09:24 AM
staehpj1
Touring
11
07-25-10 09:52 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.