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Butterfly/trekking handlebars, brakes and shifter configuration. What say you?

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Butterfly/trekking handlebars, brakes and shifter configuration. What say you?

Old 12-29-15, 07:47 PM
  #26  
Jeff Neese
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Here's my setup. I love trekking bars and so does my wife.

I see a lot of people put the shifter/brake levers all the way to the inside, apparently trying to maximize the amount of space along the "flat" or front part. That's wrong, in my opinion. Think of where your hands are going to be under hard, possibly panic-stop situations. Too far to the inside and narrow, very unstable precisely when you need control the most, under hard braking. If you slide them out to where they would normally be on flat bars, they will be where you see them in the picture. Space for your hands is about the same as a flat bar. So you're basically simulating the spacing and ergonomics of flat bars with bullhorn bar-ends.


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Old 12-29-15, 08:15 PM
  #27  
billnuke1 
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Two old Schwinn CrissCrosses. Their best days may be behind them!
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Old 12-29-15, 09:22 PM
  #28  
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Awesome to find this thread. Was just asking about this in my disc Trucker thread. Carry on...
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Old 12-29-15, 11:47 PM
  #29  
DropBarFan
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Originally Posted by hujev View Post
The only thing frustrating on these bars is no decent mirror option - here I'm using the best I've found, the Ortlieb, but it vibrates something awful on the flimsy plastic arm... Maybe one day I'll make a bar mount for the Mirrycle mirror (the best mirror in my opinion; I use two on each of my touring bikes with rando bars and 'cable out the top' levers).
EVT Safe Zone helmet mirror works far better than any handlebar mirror. Head position can easily be altered a bit with Safe Zone to scan all area behind while a handlebar mirror view is much more restricted. H-bar mirrors easily damaged if bike falls over.
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Old 07-19-16, 03:13 PM
  #30  
Pukeskywalker
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Originally Posted by Centaurious View Post
I wish that I could find a set of bars like these. They are the only ones I have seen with an angle to the grip. This is from an image search for trekking bars.

It's been a while but I found what you're looking for. Genetic Zygote Trekking bar. Not exactly the same, clamp is 31.8 and the reach is farther, but it works




https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...s.php?id=77885
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Old 07-19-16, 03:30 PM
  #31  
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Thanks Luke, a while back I bought a pair of the standard nashbar type, I would have ordered these instead even if they cost more. The only issue I see could be that ergo style grips would most likely have less room to go closer to the sides, hitting the bend at the corner sooner than on the ones with straight sections. From my experience, and preference, an angle is always more comfortable than straight. On my trekking bars (soon to come off in any case) I really only stay on the straight section to brake and or quickly shift with my trigger shifters.
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Old 07-20-16, 08:21 AM
  #32  
fietsbob 
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I simply double layer with padded tape .. WB Bicycle Gallery: Robert Clark's Koga Miyata WTR
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Old 07-22-16, 02:08 PM
  #33  
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On my trekking bar equipped Trek 720, I put cross levers and reverse aero levers on each side, so that I could grab the brakes from more locations. Doing it over again, I'd go with two sets of cross levers Tektro RL720 for cantilevers, RL740 for V-brakes.

I went with Sunrace friction levers on the inside front bend, which I can reach from many positions.

Take a look at post #43 in http://www.bikeforums.net/commuting/...l#post18261969
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Old 07-23-16, 05:04 AM
  #34  
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I like integrated brake/shifter combos, like Shimano EF51 or EF65. That's one of the nice thing about Trekking bars - it's a straight swap of handlebars with no need to change anything else. What fits on your straight bars also fits on the Trekking bars.

But, I have to say I wish people would ditch the ergo palm rest grips when they go to Trekking bars. They don't go together. They don't let you slide the controls as far outward as they would be on straight bars, and you end up with a very narrow grip. Especially when you need the most control, when you're braking, your hands will be far too close together.

You can prove this to yourself by taking your current straight bars and moving the controls about two inches inward. Ride like that for a while and see how you like it. Try a few panic stops, or practice maneuvers. You won't like it at all.

Put the controls as far out as possible (while obviously giving your hands enough room). Then just double-wrap the bars. I use generic foamy/stretchy stuff underneath, and 3.5mm Lizard Skins.
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Old 07-23-16, 06:06 AM
  #35  
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while like most things on bikes, personal preference is what it comes down to, but I tend to agree with this statement about the grips being a bit too narrow. I certainly did notice this in the last few months or so when I've tried trekking bars for the first time.
I transfered the ergo style grips from my risers over the trekking, and the narrowness was apparent, although for me not a big big deal.
What I did notice right away is that the outer edge of the grips were higher than the wrapped bar area, so I put some wrapped old tube on the bars at that area to bring it up closer to the level of the edge of teh grip, with the intention to put a layer of bar tape over this, to try to seamlessly have a transition from grip to bar.

in the end, as I am doing a dropbar conversion on this bike, I didn't make the effort to put on the bartape, but I do see the advantage of not using ergo grips because it then allows you place your hands at any point along the bar width wise, and I found that unless braking, I was on the outer areas (in that "on the hoods" wrist position)

I see ergo grips as a real advantage on straight bars, this is certainly my experience, but less so on trekking bars.

anyway, its fun to try out different setups, its the only way to really see how X or Y details work for you in different riding situations.
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Old 07-24-16, 08:11 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Pukeskywalker View Post
It's been a while but I found what you're looking for. Genetic Zygote Trekking bar. Not exactly the same, clamp is 31.8 and the reach is farther, but it works




https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...s.php?id=77885
Thanks for sharing this. These look to be exactly what I want. I just ordered them.
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