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Interrupter Brake Levers: Are they useful on touring bike?

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Interrupter Brake Levers: Are they useful on touring bike?

Old 08-15-13, 07:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Takara
I'm not afraid that you're all going to die tomorrow, but I'm generally against these extra brake levers.

You want your muscle memory to be performing the panic stop -- you don't want your choosy brain making more complicated choices between two sets of break levers.
In the two most common braking scenarios (bar tops, hoods) there are brake levers already in my hands so there's no choice to be made. I am not going to let go of the brake levers that are in my hands in search of other brakes levers. The same thing applies to the the drops since the brake levers are either in my hands or within reach. Also, in a true panic stop it's a reflex that squeezes the brake lever not higher level analysis (which brake lever should I choose?). Interrupter levers can increase safety on descents, maneuvering in traffic, and the extra hand position on the bar tops.
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Old 08-15-13, 07:15 AM
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Originally Posted by djb
I have them on my Tricross, like them in traffic or on rough descents. They were not an issue getting my handlebar bag on, but they do take up some bar space, so after putting my Ortlieb mount on recently without any issues with the interrupters, I had to move my bike computer mount to a more improvised position, but not a big deal.
In my opinion, they certainly arent necessary, but I do like having them now that Ive ridden this bike for 3 seasons and like having them a lot.
I've got them on my tricross and never use them. On rough descents (which I only rarely do) I just get in the drops and use the main levers. The bike feels more controlled from the drops.

On a fast descent where I want to slow the bike I'll get in the drops and then raise my body up as far as I can, so I've got full access to gears and brakes but also generate as much air resistance as I can manage.
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Old 08-15-13, 10:02 AM
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as with many things bike or non bike, the various comments certainly show that there are different preferences, and in any case, its fairly common now (and fairly inexpensive) to either put interrupter levers on a bike that doesnt have them, or to take them off if one isnt keen on them. Its all good.

Takara, re the old Royal Enfield with the left side rear brake pedal. As you say, that would be very strange to get onto from a "normal" bike. I started riding motorcycles in the late 70s and never had a chance to ride any older British bikes, so never knew that, interesting. Do you know when they stopped doing that? 40s 50s? When I did some production racing in the early 80s there used to be some Vintage racing classes (mostly 500 singles from the 50s) and while they were cool to listen to on track, I never sat on one so didnt notice if they had a diff setup from the norm, not that I even suspected they could be.
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Old 08-16-13, 05:09 PM
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Maybe we should switch to penny farthing bikes. No confusing levers or shifters to overly tax our minds when we want to stop.

Originally Posted by djb
Takara, re the old Royal Enfield with the left side rear brake pedal. As you say, that would be very strange to get onto from a "normal" bike. I started riding motorcycles in the late 70s and never had a chance to ride any older British bikes, so never knew that, interesting. Do you know when they stopped doing that?
Can't speak about Enfields. The Triumphs, BSAs and Nortons had the shifter on the right (instead of the wrong) side, and brake on the left. I think it was late 1970s when a new federal law in USA required that all bikes have shifter on the left and brake on the right.

Photo of my 1974 Triumph Daytona with right side shifter.

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Old 08-16-13, 08:25 PM
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My 68 R60 BMW the brake pedal was on the right, the shift toe lever on the left .. sold the bike long ago .

still got the Insruction Manual
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Old 08-16-13, 09:52 PM
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Tourist-neat, thanks.

I was curious and looked up stuff on this left brake pedal thing, apparently in 1975 a standardization law came in so that all motorcycles would have the rear brake on the right. I read on some motorcycle forums that Bultaco had the right side shifter into the 70s. I know the very first bike I bought was a late 60s ish Honda 175 and it was the current setup, so I suspect it was the Brit bikes that had it like that until the standardization stuff came in.

as I said, for me because I rode motorcycles so much and was into racing, on two wheels it is completely second nature to use the front brake as hard as possible for hard stops, and emergency situations on a bicycle always come back to using my right hand to hammer on the front brake and modulate it for the given conditions.
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