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(Ultra) light camping, bike ?

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(Ultra) light camping, bike ?

Old 10-22-13, 11:01 AM
  #1  
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(Ultra) light camping, bike ?

Hello,

I need adviceon buying a (race)bike that is suitable for long distance self supported rides (just daily rides till like 1month rides).

Mostly the Tour Divide inspired me. I am a mountainbiker, so for this kind of riding I wanted to buy the Salsa Fargo. But after some thinking I don't think it's the right bike for me. Why? I live in The Netherlands, so almost no difference in height and more important a lot of asphalt and pavement. It's not the right place for a Fargo. If I would buy one the first thing I would probably change it to less mountainbike-a like-tires.

So now I'm looking for a race-bike for (ultra)light-touring. But I don't know where to start or where I should pay attention to.

Another question; what are the disadvantages touring on a race-bike?

Thanks in advance.


Jvb
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Old 10-22-13, 11:21 AM
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People tour the coast on all sorts of bikes .. If the bike doesnt seem suitable for a rack and pannier kit,

get a Bike Trailer and put all your gear in it that makes things simpler..

+ the trailer is darned handy between tours.. I like 2 wheel trailers , others prefer 1 wheel types
eXtrawheel, BoB, of that sort..

disadvantage ? you may wish for lower low gears when you have a bunch of rolling hills to climb for a couple days..

or mountains like the Rockies , Cascades or Alps to cross ..

theres dozens of brands all making a 'race bike'
now others will do name dropping of the popular brands , that they buy.

It's like asking 'what kind of soup is Good. ?'

in order to be ultra light , leave 90% of the Kit at Home.

Last edited by fietsbob; 10-29-13 at 12:00 PM.
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Old 10-22-13, 11:35 AM
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Sounds like an endurance bike is what you might be looking for. Road style bike that is setup for long hours in the saddle. An example of this bike would the Raleigh Revenio.

http://www.raleighusa.com/bikes-road-endurance-revenio
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Old 10-22-13, 11:56 AM
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You need to figure out how you are going to carry your gear before you settle on a bike. If you can get away from panniers and racks you can use almost any bike. My personal preference is for the modern "endurance" bikes like the Specialized Roubaix, Bianchi Infinito and the now discontinued Cervelo RS. They have slightly longer wheelbases and higher headtubes than true race bikes and many wil take 28mm tires. But your choice is going to be highly dependent on your gear, bags and planned route.


Last edited by nun; 10-22-13 at 12:00 PM.
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Old 10-22-13, 12:20 PM
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Steel frame racer! You're perfect for it!

Salsa Colossal, Salsa Warbird, Surly Pacer
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Old 10-22-13, 12:26 PM
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Thorn Audax or Club Tour both great bike 700c wheels or Terry Dolan bikes are excellent all uk based.if like nun said you get your load sorted then basically road bike will do fine.
good hunting.
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Old 10-22-13, 12:51 PM
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Maybe a Giant Anyroad http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/...1/14819/66151/

Giant has several other bikes in this category, look around their website.
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Old 10-22-13, 01:55 PM
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Longer wheelbase touring bikes are more comfortable, absorbing more shock, but loose some efficiency. Touring bikes accept fenders more readily, and have braze-ons for racks and extra bottle cages. All those nice thing come at a cost in weight.

I rode over 2000 miles one trip on a racing bike and it was kind of uncomfortable on the back and neck, but the jury's out whether it was worth it or not. Some enjoy the quicker response and sportier ride even when touring. Try it and see.
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Old 10-22-13, 02:39 PM
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Thanks all for your answers!

Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
People tour the coast on all sorts of bikes .. If the bike doesnt seem suitable for a rack and pannier kit,

get a Bike Trailer and put all your gear in it that makes things simpler..

+ the trailer is darned handy between tours.. I like 2 wheel trailers , others prefer 1 wheel types
eXtrawheel, BoB, of that sort..

disadvantage ? you may wish for lower low gears when you have a bunch of rolling hills to climb for a couple days..

or mountains like the Rockies , Cascades or Alps to cross ..

theres dozens of brands all making a 'race bike'
now others will do name dropping of the popular brands , that they buy.

It's like asking 'what kind of soup is Good. ?'
A trailer.. Meh I don't think that is something what I want. I want to travel light.
I'm more interested in like a framebag/saddlebag/handlebarbag/etc. (like the Revelate Designs bags)

Originally Posted by WonderMonkey View Post
Sounds like an endurance bike is what you might be looking for. Road style bike that is setup for long hours in the saddle. An example of this bike would the Raleigh Revenio.

http://www.raleighusa.com/bikes-road-endurance-revenio
Yes, an endurance bike is the exact name, that's what I want.

Originally Posted by nun View Post
You need to figure out how you are going to carry your gear before you settle on a bike. If you can get away from panniers and racks you can use almost any bike. My personal preference is for the modern "endurance" bikes like the Specialized Roubaix, Bianchi Infinito and the now discontinued Cervelo RS. They have slightly longer wheelbases and higher headtubes than true race bikes and many wil take 28mm tires. But your choice is going to be highly dependent on your gear, bags and planned route.
I'm going to carry my gear in framebag/saddlebag/handlebarbag/etc. (like the Revelate Designs bags)
28mm sound fine, I nice to not have the smallest tires... especially for longer rides I think.

Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Steel frame racer! You're perfect for it!

Salsa Colossal, Salsa Warbird, Surly Pacer
Steel, sounds... reliable I already had found the Salsa I'll look into these.

Originally Posted by antokelly View Post
Thorn Audax or Club Tour both great bike 700c wheels or Terry Dolan bikes are excellent all uk based.if like nun said you get your load sorted then basically road bike will do fine.
good hunting.
UK based?
Every roadbike will do fine? What about carbon bikes? A bike specially for this kind of riding is always better isn't it?

Originally Posted by Shifty View Post
Maybe a Giant Anyroad http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/...1/14819/66151/

Giant has several other bikes in this category, look around their website.
Those x-road adventure bikes are ugly :/ On the other hand the endurance bikes look a lot better.

Originally Posted by andrewclaus View Post
Longer wheelbase touring bikes are more comfortable, absorbing more shock, but loose some efficiency. Touring bikes accept fenders more readily, and have braze-ons for racks and extra bottle cages. All those nice thing come at a cost in weight.

I rode over 2000 miles one trip on a racing bike and it was kind of uncomfortable on the back and neck, but the jury's out whether it was worth it or not. Some enjoy the quicker response and sportier ride even when touring. Try it and see.
I will find out



My budget is max. 2000,- for a bike. (cheaper is allowed )

What about the reliability of a race bike? Are flat tires a more common thing? And other defects?


Oh btw looking at the picture "nun" posts; it doesn't like he's is carrying camp gear besides al the other stuff is he..?
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Old 10-22-13, 02:46 PM
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Recommend a long wheelbase low bottom bracket steel touring bike. Just don't carry a lot of gear. You'll be fast and comfortable. The stability and shock absorption is worth it.



Pic is from a 1.5 day 180 mile CT-MA-CT fast tour.

The real weight savings comes from how you pack. I learned much here: backpackinglight.com They have an excellent forum-- there are a lot of ways to pack light without going insanely ultralight.
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Old 10-22-13, 02:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Jvb View Post


Oh btw looking at the picture "nun" posts; it doesn't like he's is carrying camp gear besides al the other stuff is he..?
Yes I'm carrying tent, sleeping bag, pad, cooking gear etc. Here is a very pedantic and complete list.

http://wheelsofchance.wordpress.com/.../25/gear-list/

I used the set up this summer on a 9 day, 550mile ride from Boston to Buffalo. I camped a couple of nights and spend the other nights in motels.
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Old 10-22-13, 02:56 PM
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Best way to travel light is with a big wallet..
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Old 10-22-13, 05:21 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Best way to travel light is with a big wallet..
It definitely makes things more comfortable, but it isn't necessary.
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Old 10-22-13, 05:24 PM
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as long as you keep your wallet close to your chest you should be fine
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Old 10-22-13, 10:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Jvb View Post
I live in The Netherlands, so almost no difference in height and more important a lot of asphalt and pavement. It's not the right place for a Fargo.
"Almost no difference in height" = almost no reason to worry about weight. Pushing the air out of your way will be a much bigger factor in speed/efficiency. To that end, I bet frame bags would be very helpful.
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Old 10-23-13, 12:02 AM
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Originally Posted by nun View Post
Yes I'm carrying tent, sleeping bag, pad, cooking gear etc. Here is a very pedantic and complete list.

http://wheelsofchance.wordpress.com/.../25/gear-list/

I used the set up this summer on a 9 day, 550mile ride from Boston to Buffalo. I camped a couple of nights and spend the other nights in motels.
Very usefull, thanks!

Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
"Almost no difference in height" = almost no reason to worry about weight. Pushing the air out of your way will be a much bigger factor in speed/efficiency. To that end, I bet frame bags would be very helpful.
Yes, wind is a much bigger factor here. But I'm thinking about riding to Santiago de Compostela, and I will encounter mountains on the way there.
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Old 10-23-13, 02:20 AM
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In the UK we have "winter training" style roadbikes. These have greater tyre clearance, often using Shimano long-srop caliper brakes, to fit 28mm tyres + fenders. They have fender fittings and usually, upper seatstay rack eyelets. Most of them are made from butted aluminium but a few come in carbon fibre. Components are usually quality training grade for extended use over wet winters.
The other UK style of interest is Audax, a form of non-competative endurance riding where fenders (mudguards) are compulsory. The pattern is similar to "winter training" but the frame is usually steel and the components higher grade.
Many of the brands bring in similar quality taiwanese frames and brand them with stickers but the results are quite OK.
Look for Thorn, Kinesis, Ribble, Hewitt, Pearson, Tifosi, Planet X.

Having rack eyelets opens up a lot of extra possibilities but you can use rack-less luggage such as Carradice saddlebags. The same with tyre clearance, you can chose 25mm if you like but have the option of 28 if you should need it.

Last edited by MichaelW; 10-24-13 at 05:46 PM.
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Old 10-23-13, 05:16 PM
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I personally think steel is the way to go. BUT, last summer I did a long tour on a super light high end CF climber (04 Trek 5900 Superlight). I swapped out the wheels for 650B so I could get some comfortable 32 Grand Bois tires. With Chris King hubs those wheels were actually lighter than the race wheels that came with the bike. Seat bag and handlebar bag and a small frame bag. Loved it. I have other experiments planned but I still think lightweight steel is the way to go "light" on a tour.
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Old 10-24-13, 10:01 AM
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A Fargo seems like it would be a good on and off-road touring bike. If you're doing an all-pavement tour, just put some slick touring tires on there instead of the knobbies.
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Old 10-24-13, 12:42 PM
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Originally Posted by dbg View Post
I personally think steel is the way to go. BUT, last summer I did a long tour on a super light high end CF climber (04 Trek 5900 Superlight). I swapped out the wheels for 650B so I could get some comfortable 32 Grand Bois tires. With Chris King hubs those wheels were actually lighter than the race wheels that came with the bike. Seat bag and handlebar bag and a small frame bag. Loved it. I have other experiments planned but I still think lightweight steel is the way to go "light" on a tour.
Ah Man gotta see photos of that set up (Please)
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Old 10-25-13, 06:20 AM
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Originally Posted by antokelly View Post
Ah Man gotta see photos of that set up (Please)
I disassembled that setup after the trip and swapped the same wheels into my favorite lightweight (sort of) steel tourer shown here.
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Old 10-25-13, 07:09 AM
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Originally Posted by jbphilly View Post
A Fargo seems like it would be a good on and off-road touring bike. If you're doing an all-pavement tour, just put some slick touring tires on there instead of the knobbies.
Why would I buy a fargo than? When I'm only riding pavement?
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Old 10-25-13, 07:36 AM
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I just found this since I've got a Cannondale dealer in my area, can this be the right bike for what I want?
Again, I'm a mountainbiker I almost don't know anything about race bikes..
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Old 10-25-13, 07:37 AM
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Jvb, I day trip, which is considerably lighter than fully loaded, and I use my touring bike. That said I recently built a distance roadie that when configured like nun's RS can also do the chore. The largest tire that'll fit is 25 mm, but on pavement that's all that's needed.

The touring bike weighs a little over 26 lbs. (11.8 kg+), the roadie weighs 20 lbs. (9.1 kg). Not a significant difference when factoring in rider's weight, two full water bottles and tools for road side repair. While both bicycles can be made lighter, in particular the touring bike, I'm at a comfortable weight for each when factoring in reliability.

I use triple crank sets on each which work well in the coastal plains I live in and the Texas hill country with that region's short, but sometimes very steep climbs.

Brad

PS For a visual comparison of the two:
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Old 10-25-13, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Jvb View Post
I just found this since I've got a Cannondale dealer in my area, can this be the right bike for what I want?
Again, I'm a mountainbiker I almost don't know anything about race bikes..
Absolutely.

Brad
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