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A few questions about road bike damage prevention and fitting your bike inside of car

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A few questions about road bike damage prevention and fitting your bike inside of car

Old 10-26-13, 05:23 PM
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ecsdude
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A few questions about road bike damage prevention and fitting your bike inside of car

Hi All,

I'm relatively new to road/touring bikes and bike care/preventative maintenance as a whole, so I'd appreciate it if you all could help answer the following questions for me:

1. Does repeatedly removing/putting back on your seat post by loosening and tightening the clamp cause any long-term damage or compromise the clamp's effectiveness over time? Let's say you ride every day and unload your bike from your car to go riding and reload the bike at the end of your ride...

2. Similar to question #1 , except relating to your front tire and fork... does putting on/removing your front tire and using the quick release mechanism every day cause any long-term damage or compromise its effectiveness?

3. If you don't want your fork scratched up where the quick release parts and skewer make contact with it at the bottom, is it safe to use a thin rubber washer on the inner and outer sides of the fork?

4. What are some modern cars/suv/wagons that allow you to put your whole road bike inside of fully upright, without having to remove the front wheel or seat post?

5. Do most touring bike owners prefer to use MKS type pedals that work with everyday shoes or do they go with clipless like the Shimano 520 and compatible shoes? do they make shoes as light and comfortable as running shoes that you can actually walk in without scraping the connection mechaism on the bottom for clipless pedals?

Thanks in advance!
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Old 10-26-13, 06:36 PM
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fietsbob 
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No.2, the grip of axle in to fork needs to be solid

if really OCD on scratches get a bike with chromed fork tips

a Dodge Sprinter Delivery truck that you can stand up in may be your best choice.

I sell my car so I could afford to tour, and vacated my apartment too.


And 5 .. Broad generalizations are a folly.

Last edited by fietsbob; 10-27-13 at 09:46 AM.
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Old 10-26-13, 10:27 PM
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1. Short answer. Theoretically, yes. Practically, if you're careful, no.
2. See number one.
3. Absolutely not, especially if you value your life. This is incredibly dangerous. The bike will get marred a bit in this area, and for safety, it's important that it does.
4. Depends on the overall height of the bike itself, but almost any minivan or large SUV (not sedans or wagons) that has removable seats and a flat floor will work for this.
5. Personal preference, you'll see that many do and many don't use "clip-in" pedals/shoes. As far as walkability, most mountain bike shoes walk well enough but you'll want some commuter style shoes if you want to run errands and such on a regular basis.
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Old 10-27-13, 04:37 AM
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Seat post clamp is no big thing, but if it's carbon take care. I would prefer not to take my carbon post off each time I use my car (and I don't). Wheel removal? Don't even think or worry about it. Rubber washer? That's crazy talk. Seriously. Put it out of your mind. Suburban and minivans and 1/2ton and larger pickup trucks with a topper can fit most bikes without removal of the seatpost. I have to take off my front wheel to roll into the back of my pickup bed with a topper on it but then I can lock it in place with a home made internal fork rack and it stays clean and safe no matter the weather outside.
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Old 10-27-13, 05:17 AM
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Welcome to the forum, ecsdude.

While everyone I know tries to prevent cosmetic damage to their bicycles, they don't obsess over it as it'll happen sooner or later. Just the nature of a two wheeled vehicle. For a quick release to work, scratches to the drop outs are unavoidable.

If I have to, I can transport a bike inside of my 2000 Mustang (barely) by laying it down, RD up, and by removing the front wheel. The rear seat backs are both opened and the bike goes in rear wheel first through the passenger door. The front wheel can go to the front passenger's footwell or laid atop the bike using a towel in between the two.

If you're going to keep tightening and loosening the seat clamp's bolt I suggest find a clamp with a quick release lever. If you want something specifically to carry the bike(s) upright take a look at the Ford Transit Connect.

Brad
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Old 10-27-13, 06:21 AM
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Originally Posted by ecsdude View Post
1. Does repeatedly removing/putting back on your seat post by loosening and tightening the clamp cause any long-term damage or compromise the clamp's effectiveness over time? Let's say you ride every day and unload your bike from your car to go riding and reload the bike at the end of your ride...
Use good grease on the bolt threads to minimize wear. See Bradtx comments on quick release.

Originally Posted by ecsdude View Post
2. Similar to question #1 , except relating to your front tire and fork... does putting on/removing your front tire and using the quick release mechanism every day cause any long-term damage or compromise its effectiveness?
Grease or oil the quick release mechanism. This should last virtually forever.

Originally Posted by ecsdude View Post
3. If you don't want your fork scratched up where the quick release parts and skewer make contact with it at the bottom, is it safe to use a thin rubber washer on the inner and outer sides of the fork?
See fietsbob comment, you do not want to use anything different than the manufacturer used. If you are really that obsessive about a nick in the paint where nobody will see it, then:
- buy some auto touch up paint, model paint or nail polish that nearly matches the color, or
- take a big screwdriver and put so many scratches in the paint that you will not notice any new ones.

Originally Posted by ecsdude View Post
4. What are some modern cars/suv/wagons that allow you to put your whole road bike inside of fully upright, without having to remove the front wheel or seat post?
Don't know. The few people I know that put their bike inside a van pull off the front wheel and put the front fork into a quick release bracket that is mounted on a big board to hold the bike upright.

Originally Posted by ecsdude View Post
5. Do most touring bike owners prefer to use MKS type pedals that work with everyday shoes or do they go with clipless like the Shimano 520 and compatible shoes? do they make shoes as light and comfortable as running shoes that you can actually walk in without scraping the connection mechaism on the bottom for clipless pedals?
From what I have observed, most use clipless pedals but I have seen several tourists that use platform pedals, with or without toe clips. Some use platform pedals with a strap over the top.

I use Shimano M324 pedals for touring, this allows me to use bike shoes with cleats or use regular shoes. For example, a short run into the grocery store or restaurant in the evening from a campsite, I prefer regular shoes. Also, this past spring one day my bike shoes were soaked from two days of rain, the next day I wore regular shoes while my bike shoes had a head start on drying out.

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Old 10-27-13, 11:58 AM
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Thanks alot, guys. I'm going to go with those dual platform pedals mentioned Tourist in MSN. I think they're exactly what I want.

And I guess you're right, I just will accept that some parts of the bike simply inevitably will get paint scratched off... I won't try the rubber washers idea and will keep everything stock at the fork/quick release area.

Lastly, good to know that daily clamping of seat post and removal on my chromoly bike frame won't compromise its integrity over time.
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Old 10-27-13, 04:04 PM
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We often carry two bikes with both wheels off in the back seat of our 2011 Kia Optima when we're on a driving vacation. I made a simple cover for the rear seats, and add a piece of rubber-backed carpet runner to grab any chain grease. I always put the chains on the large ring/small cog (so the chain ring teeth are not protruding), and retain them with a clever device made by Pedro's. My frames are large (63-64cm), and I don't have to remove or lower the saddle. We can leave rear racks installed. I put several large towels over the first bike to protect frame paint before loading the second bike, and add a small towel over the second bike chain to avoid inadvertent smudges. I can hang both rear wheels under the bike handlebars behind the driver's seat, but the front wheels go in the trunk above our suitcases, since we use the space behind the passenger seat for a small cooler.

We've just returned from our second multi-week vacation doing this and it works very well, since all the trunk is available for suitcases. It helps that I'm proficient at removing and installing rear wheels without touching the chain, plus I try to keep the chains relatively clean. I can load the bikes alone, but it's much easier if my wife is on the other side to guide the handlebars into place.

When we had a hatchback Audi A3, we could put both bikes in with only the front wheels off (back seat down), but luggage space around the bikes was limited.

I would never worry about quick release life, but then I use high quality QR's. Yes, the dropouts get scratched on our rather high-end frames, as they should! My "new" 1987 Marinoni that is full chrome under the paint still has very good chrome in the dropouts even with all those years of wheels going in and out.

My wife and I have been using mountain bike type clipless pedals for over 20 years (love my older Crank Borthers Candy pedals) and not likely to change anytime soon.
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Old 10-28-13, 06:17 AM
  #9  
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I am able to fit my 62cm Surly LHT upright in my Honda Element.
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