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I have a disc LHT - Looking for "sport" or "light" tourer

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I have a disc LHT - Looking for "sport" or "light" tourer

Old 05-14-14, 08:52 AM
  #26  
fietsbob 
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Road bike with a Bob trailer* is one of the choices made by cycle tourists riding the coast every year.

maybe you can cut your load down to a handlebar bag and a large British style saddle bag .. ?

*Extra wheel trailer would work .. too. ( .. all 3 tires same size so only need 1 size spare tube.. )
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Old 05-14-14, 09:16 AM
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I'm still baffled by your insistence on a tourer for fast rides unloaded. And just about any road bike can carry a light load.

Get a light endurance bike or race bike.

Or, put lighter tires on your current bike. Done.

Your list of requirements just seems so OCD. No offense. Just an honest opinion meant to be constructive.
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Old 05-14-14, 11:37 AM
  #28  
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But I think there is a difference between a road bike and a light tourer. And it's maybe just my definition, but a road bike is what I might choose on a predefined route with well known conditions (group ride, workout, etc). A light tourer must carry supplies for unknown conditions (jacket, snacks, tools, maps, more) and be capable of navigating the occasional unintended gravel road or farm path. And have fenders in case it rains, etc.

Last edited by dbg; 05-14-14 at 11:40 AM.
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Old 05-14-14, 11:45 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by dbg View Post
But I think there is a difference between a road bike and a light tourer. And it's maybe just my definition, but a road bike is what I might choose on a predefined route with well known conditions (group ride, workout, etc). A light tourer must carry supplies for unknown conditions (jacket, snacks, tools, maps, more) and be capable of navigating the occasional unintended gravel road or farm path. And have fenders in case it rains, etc.
Any road bike can carry a light load.

Check out the 'clydes' subforum. Light road bikes are carrying 350 pound riders with no problem.
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Old 05-14-14, 11:57 AM
  #30  
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I can definitely see the appeal of sport or light touring bikes, as I have owned several. They are lighter weight and livelier than a full touring bike, but still have mounts for fenders and racks. I have used my sport touring bikes for commuting, recreational rides and supported tours. My main sport tourer these days is a Waterford RST-22 that I bought used, but I formerly owned a Gunnar Sport and Salsa Casseroll that had similar geometries and specs. Salsa no longer sells the Casseroll or anything like it, but Gunnar Sports are widely available. The Soma Smoothie ES has similar features. The All-City Space Horse is really closer to a touring bike than sport touring.

You might also want to consider a cross bike like the Gunnar Crosshairs, Soma Doublecross, Surly Crosscheck, All-City Macho or Nature Boy, Salsa Vaya, Bianchi Volpe -- but sport touring bikes are "sportier" in my view, altho generally less versatile.
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Old 05-14-14, 12:39 PM
  #31  
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Focus less on the minutae of slight geometry differences and more on the big picture. Go out and ride some of the bikes being suggested to you instead of dismissing them based on conjecture.
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Old 05-14-14, 12:55 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by tarwheel View Post
I can definitely see the appeal of sport or light touring bikes, as I have owned several. They are lighter weight and livelier than a full touring bike, but still have mounts for fenders and racks.
Trek racing bikes have rack and fender mounts.
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Old 05-14-14, 06:36 PM
  #33  
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The Pake C'Mute is one idea.

PAKE | Product Detail > C'Mute Frame
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Old 05-14-14, 08:15 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by roadandmountain View Post
Any road bike can carry a light load.

Check out the 'clydes' subforum. Light road bikes are carrying 350 pound riders with no problem.
Light road bikes: 250=yes, 350=no
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Old 05-14-14, 10:14 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by BigAura View Post
Light road bikes: 250=yes, 350=no
I don't want to search for the posts, but I've seen some posters who weigh 300+ lbs who say they ride light road bikes without issue.

The point is that a light road bike can carry a lot of weight. You certainly don't need a 'light tourer' to carry 25 lbs of gear.
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Old 05-14-14, 11:44 PM
  #36  
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200k? sport/light tourer? i think you need to jump into the rando thread (we don't bite ) the people who are giving you crap about being OCD and too fine-detailed about what you want aren't being very helpful. i know exactly what kind of bike you're talking about because i'd like to build one up too

my backstory: i have several bikes to choose from for the 200k's/one 300k i have been doing in eastern PA, but am sticking with my heavy 2001 trek 1000 probably for the rest of this year at least. it's got the light luggage capacity that i need, but lacks clearance for fenders even though it has the mounts. key for me, the entry level road geometry definitely makes it sporty and quick-handling, which i don't think i could give up. i rode my 2012 kona jake the snake for one brevet, and it just felt overbuilt and not quite right (it fits for CX and bad-weather riding but i probably should have tweaked the fit for a 200k). in the complete other corner, i have a 1980s shogun touring that feels like a tank. i entertained ideas of trying to lighten it up and turning it into a budget brevet bike, but i am pretty much in the same situation you are in that regard. why compromise when i already have a better tool for the job?

in addition to what a few others have said, all city and the surly pacer are pretty good options, albeit a bit pricey as they usually come complete. of course, this is all relative, as the rivendell frames and custom rando bikes can get $$$ in a heartbeat. i'm hard pressed to think of other off-the-peg options, and i have been doing the same research you have been. i have my eyes on the VO pass hunter, but it'll be awhile before i can afford to get the frame and build it up exactly how i would like. will probably hold out for that frame...
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Old 05-14-14, 11:48 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
There are more than a few great steel bikes that meet the OP's needs ("Sport" touring). Soma doublecross would work well as would the surly crosscheck. Or the soma smoothie or surly pacer if looking for something a bit racier. The all city space horse is pretty much designed to be a light tourer along the lines that the OP is looking for. Or look for a vintage sports touring bike that takes long reach side pulls and then mod it to your heart's content. They're out there. Also the Velo Orange pass hunter would work very well.

Honestly, I don't think you should be that fixated on all the numbers you threw out there. There are plenty of good ways of designing a frame that may not meet all those requirements. I'd focus more on the stated goal of your N plus 1 (sports or light touring).
missed your post but these are all exactly what i have in mind.
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Old 05-15-14, 07:24 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by roadandmountain View Post
Trek racing bikes have rack and fender mounts.
Come on... None of mine do. Nor is there any chance of clearance for fenders. And my 04 superlight wouldn't even fit 25's.

adding: 650B conversion was huge success for me, however --but still no room for anything but those minimal clip on fenders.

Last edited by dbg; 05-15-14 at 07:31 AM.
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Old 05-15-14, 10:12 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by dbg View Post
Come on... None of mine do. Nor is there any chance of clearance for fenders. And my 04 superlight wouldn't even fit 25's.

adding: 650B conversion was huge success for me, however --but still no room for anything but those minimal clip on fenders.
Yeah, but your newest Trek is 10 years old according to your little post profile. A quick check of the Trek website shows that their 1 series of aluminum road bikes have rack and fender mounts, and the Domane has fender mounts but no rack mounts. So that certainly isn't all Trek racing bikes, but several of the models do have accommodation for fenders or racks and fenders.
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Old 05-15-14, 11:15 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by grolby View Post
Yeah, but your newest Trek is 10 years old according to your little post profile. A quick check of the Trek website shows that their 1 series of aluminum road bikes have rack and fender mounts, and the Domane has fender mounts but no rack mounts. So that certainly isn't all Trek racing bikes, but several of the models do have accommodation for fenders or racks and fenders.
Sounds like a good trend
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Old 05-15-14, 11:39 AM
  #41  
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Mudguards are nice, even on road Bikes ... PDX commutes on lots of them and uses the same bike for the weekend club rides ..

you may see them as rack mounts, others will see them as mud guard mounts , same bolt can be either or both.
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Old 05-15-14, 07:10 PM
  #42  
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The Velo Orange Pass Hunter would fit all of your criteria.

I have a Surly Cross Check, but it's seriously threatened in my stable by the '83 Trek 620 I picked up off Craigslist. The Trek makes a great road bike, though I haven't tried it for any loads yet (note: I'm comparing them as fixed gears, not traditional road bikes. See, for instance, here.)

Originally Posted by JWK View Post
I love my Surly and am riding it almost daily now that the weather has finally broken here in the northeast. Some of my goals for this year is to do some centuries and at least one 200K. In the spirit of (n + 1) I would like a lighter bike more conducive to unloaded or lightly loaded riding.

Wish parameters:
1. Steel Frame
2. Chainstays 425mm - 440mm
3. Rack braze-ons at least on the back, preferably also on front
4. Doesn't need to take tires bigger than 700x32
5. BB drop at least 70mm, preferably lower
6. Rides best unloaded to 25 lb. max loaded weight
7. Rim brakes
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Old 05-16-14, 02:44 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by JWK View Post
I love my Surly and am riding it almost daily now that the weather has finally broken here in the northeast. Some of my goals for this year is to do some centuries and at least one 200K. In the spirit of (n + 1) I would like a lighter bike more conducive to unloaded or lightly loaded riding.

Wish parameters:
1. Steel Frame
2. Chainstays 425mm - 440mm
3. Rack braze-ons at least on the back, preferably also on front
4. Doesn't need to take tires bigger than 700x32
5. BB drop at least 70mm, preferably lower
6. Rides best unloaded to 25 lb. max loaded weight
7. Rim brakes

I've been looking at some of the cyclocross bikes and am concerned as to how the higher BB will affect fast downhill runs, cornering and handling in general. I've done quite a search on this and have only come up with some frame builders stating that it's mostly for cornering. It doesn't seem to me that the cyclocross bike really doesn't take the place of a light touring road bike. The Specialized Tricross prabably comes closest with its 70mm BB drop. But, aluminum frame. I'd rather stay away from aluminum.

The "new" Windsor Tourist on BD has a threadless 1.125" headset arrangement. The geometry seems about right, but I don't know and can't find out where this bike fits exactly. There is almost no info on the modern Fuji touring bikes (this is definately a Fuji touring frame) on the net. In the long run it won't be the most cost effective solution, but it will give me something to ride while I sell off components and rebuild to my liking. Anyone know if The Fuji frame is sport touring or fully loaded touring? Somewhere in between? Good option for me or too close to the Surly in weight and handling?

Then there is the vintage possibility. From the research I've done, it seems I would want something from the 80s with the now standard english threaded bottom bracket, 700c wheels and 130mm rear spacing. Actually, I could do with 126mm spacing. I have pretty decent wheels from a '92 Canondale R500 with 36H front and rear. HG-50 cassettes are still available in different, useful ranges that would fine for me with a triple up front. I did this setup for years out west with my canondale. The only problem with this scenario is that I don't have the knowledge base to know what to look for. Which frames had the good steel, etc. Plus, I don't live in an area that has very much in the way of used bikes. I've been scouring my local Craig's List for weeks and have come up with nothing more than over-priced vintage junk. I mean, nothing even questionable.

So I'm just looking for your thoughts and suggestions. I want the initial cost to be under $1000. I don't have the budget for the quality modern stuff like Gunnar or Rivendell, to name just two. This would probably put me in a used modern bike, Bikes Direct stuff or vintage that would top out at $300 or so before I start rebuilding.

Oh, and there's no rush. I realize to really get what I want might mean not have something to ride this summer. I've still got my Surly.

Thanks for any guidance.
Hello JWK,

Please check your notifications. I just sent you an e-mail you may be interested in regarding a light tourer.

MAK
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Old 05-19-14, 12:28 AM
  #44  
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How about a Velo Orange pass hunter?
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Old 05-19-14, 12:49 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by dbg View Post
Come on... None of mine do. Nor is there any chance of clearance for fenders. And my 04 superlight wouldn't even fit 25's.

adding: 650B conversion was huge success for me, however --but still no room for anything but those minimal clip on fenders.
Come on what? Do you own a '14? No. Have you checked the trek website? No. Jeez.
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Old 05-19-14, 01:03 AM
  #46  
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I still think the old 80's "sport" type frames are pretty ideal for this sort of riding... I have my disc trucker which is a nice smooth riding bike especially with fat tires and loaded up... I also have an 80's trek crit frame... while the trek will fit 32c tires (as long as the rear goes in deflated so the tire will compress enough to get past the seat tube) I'd like something with a bit more chainstay length for speed wobble stability (Zinn wrote a bit about it being common to tall guys as the seat/rider weight gets closer to the axis of the rear wheel it gets worse) but even then my bike has no qualms about running around with a loaded bar bag... I keep my eyes open for a 25.5" lugged steel trek "sport" frame... one day one will pop up at the right moment and I'll swap my parts over.

also if you do go with an older 126mm hub spaced frame no worries about running a 130mm modern road wheel, I've done it with several and none have had issues, no cold set needed Bicycle Frame/Hub Spacing

as mentioned there are plenty of relaxed geo road bikes out these days, the rando/long distance section of the forum has a ton of interesting info if thats the sort of stuff you want
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Old 05-19-14, 04:22 PM
  #47  
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For the most part, the replies have been helpful and I appreciate the info and insights. I wouldn't know where to start responding to individual posts (and it would take a really long time).

I have decided I need to learn a bit more and concentrate on training on the disc trucker. I still want something with a longer wheel base than your standard road bike, but after reading some of the responses I will be open to aluminum frames. I also just might wait until I can afford that Gunnar Sport (looked at the website - just what I want except for the price tag). I might stumble into a really nice bike from the 80s with better steel than your typical 4130. I will remain patient and shoot for my goals on the Surly if nothing comes my way this summer.

I do have a 1992 R500 Cannondale with a triple I could fix up just to have something a lot faster. I rode that thing at least a few thousand miles while I lived out in Nevada and Oregon, but it always scared the hell out of me going down fast grades. I don't even know why. The trail on it is around 64, but the wheelbase is under 1000. Good for climbing, though. Climbed like a mountain goat compared to my disc trucker. I also don't know if it would be worth the $200 - $300 it would take to get it where I want it to be.

Lots to think about while I ride.
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Old 05-19-14, 04:47 PM
  #48  
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what would it take to get the c-dale ready to go? while not exactly what you want it would be a fun bike and completely opposite of what the trucker is...

at that age there is a good possibility that the hubs may even take a 8/9/10 spd cassette (the next years r500 would) so you could easily upgrade.

plenty of options
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Old 05-19-14, 04:59 PM
  #49  
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JWK, The R500 is a good choice IMHO. It'll likely fit 25 mm tires (25 mm Conti Ultra Race tires fit my '89 3.0) and can easily tote 25 lb. of luggage in a largish saddle bag and a handle bar bag.

Brad
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Old 05-19-14, 05:06 PM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by JWK View Post
For the most part, the replies have been helpful and I appreciate the info and insights. I wouldn't know where to start responding to individual posts (and it would take a really long time).

I have decided I need to learn a bit more and concentrate on training on the disc trucker. I still want something with a longer wheel base than your standard road bike, but after reading some of the responses I will be open to aluminum frames. I also just might wait until I can afford that Gunnar Sport (looked at the website - just what I want except for the price tag). I might stumble into a really nice bike from the 80s with better steel than your typical 4130. I will remain patient and shoot for my goals on the Surly if nothing comes my way this summer.

I do have a 1992 R500 Cannondale with a triple I could fix up just to have something a lot faster. I rode that thing at least a few thousand miles while I lived out in Nevada and Oregon, but it always scared the hell out of me going down fast grades. I don't even know why. The trail on it is around 64, but the wheelbase is under 1000. Good for climbing, though. Climbed like a mountain goat compared to my disc trucker. I also don't know if it would be worth the $200 - $300 it would take to get it where I want it to be.

Lots to think about while I ride.
Thanks for the clarification. I have a far better sense of where you're coming from after reading the above.

If you don't feel safe descending with the cannondale, you should sell it. There's no point in riding a bike you feel unsafe on.

I do think your best bet is to buy a second set of wheels for your lht. You have a clear preference for touring geometry and a lighter set of wheels should make a big difference in acceleration on flats and on climbs.

There is still the issue of your racks adding weight however, so unless you fee like removing them for faster rides, there's still an argument for you getting a second bike for fast rides.
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