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Dream touring bike: steel or aluminum?

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Dream touring bike: steel or aluminum?

Old 07-08-14, 11:07 AM
  #51  
nun
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Nun doesn't need luck. He has experience. Trumps luck every time.
I would not claim to have a lot of experience touring on CF. I've done some 2 and 3 day overnighters and ridden from Boston to Niagara Falls on the Erie Canal route on the Cervelo RS. It's worked well so far.
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Old 07-08-14, 12:52 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Nun doesn't need luck. He has experience. Trumps luck every time.
.
You are right, and during the past 42 years of touring I have experienced a few things. I have toured on lightweight road bikes with 23-28mm tires. The fact that I have is the reason I don't. Best of luck to you both.

Marc
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Old 07-08-14, 02:32 PM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post

If one is not a Clyde, an interesting thing to think about is that ordinary road bikes are designed for a wide range of weights, from 100 lb. to 220 lb. or so riders. So if you weigh say 160 and tour with a big load, say 40 lbs., you're still within the range of a regular road bike's sport load. All you need is a bike with rack attachments, or in the case of nun and other light tourers, just a bike you like.

Of course if your touring plans include Uzbekistan, you're going to need more substantial tires and clearance for them.
Only problem with that comparison is that a road bike isn't designed to carry weight over the rear wheel but on the saddle, pedals and bars.
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Old 07-08-14, 02:58 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by LeeG View Post
Only problem with that comparison is that a road bike isn't designed to carry weight over the rear wheel but on the saddle, pedals and bars.
If you are going to use a steel, AL or CF bike not specifically designed for touring you should pack lightly so that any weight you put over the rear wheels is kept to a minimum. But
anyway it's perfectly possible (indeed preferable) to carry your gear on a road bike on the saddle, within the triangle and on the bars.
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Old 07-10-14, 12:02 AM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by nun View Post
I can see how wider tires might be good with a heavier bike and load, but on roads I've found that tires wider than 32mm make the riding sluggish. I've ridden 35 mm Schwalbe Duremes on my Rambouillet and loved them on gravel, but they felt slow on the road which was frustrating. So it's really choosing the appropriate tire for the terrain. I just think that 32mm tires are wide enough to deal with most loads on the road and the advantages of the cushioning of wider tires gets outweighed by the extra rolling resistance.
Yes, 32 is about the limit for me. There are some 35s kicking around the workshop somewhere, but they have been replaced with 32s. All our riding in Europe, Canada and back in Australia on our Thorn touring bikes was on 28 Schwalbe Duranos. The 32s in Conti Contact touring form have been brought in for some of the gravel road riding we have been doing of late.
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Old 07-10-14, 12:05 AM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
FYI, there was an entire thread about how easy it is to repair everything under the sun using carbon fiber tow and resin or epoxy. Not that you're going to find either CF tow or epoxy at a back alley repair shop, but the materials are light enough that you could carry them with you if you're the overly paranoid type. I wouldn't want to trust either a roadside fiber+epoxy repair or a backwoods weld, but if I had to pick between the two I'd go with fiber and epoxy or resin. The fiber repair might not hold, but it probably won't make the problem any worse as could easily happen when welding. Believe me: I've done enough steel, stainless steel, aluminum, and titanium welding to know that you can make a huge mess of things very quickly. Especially true if you don't regularly work with extremely thin metals, like the sort used for bicycle tubes.
Yes, and my feeling strongly is that if anyone needs a steel frame repaired that they steer entirely away from a workshop with any form of stick or wire welding, and find one that can do some brazing. You can still do some damage, but blasting a hole or three in thin tubing isn't something easily achieved with brazing.
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Old 07-10-14, 09:34 AM
  #57  
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We spent yesterday morning with a woman who has been living on her aluminum Mirada mountain bike for seven years! She has been all over the world and has replaced everything except the frame.
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Old 07-10-14, 10:47 AM
  #58  
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Bottom line summation: frame material is irrelevant. The frame should be designed and built for the application; which a good bicycle designer can do using many different materials: various iron based alloys (aka steel); aluminum based alloys; magnesium; titanium; beryllium; carbon fiber; glass fiber; bamboo (grass); wood; thermal plastic; etc.

There are tons of opinions out there, a few are valid.

Choosing the frame material first is backwards. First make a list of all your requirements (musts/needs) and wants (would likes) for your touring bike. Then map components and accessories to that list. With your list; visit several custom frame builders, and pick the one that you feel the most comfortable with. And finally, discuss frame materials.
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Old 07-10-14, 11:55 AM
  #59  
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Heard That !

Originally Posted by nfmisso View Post
Bottom line summation: frame material is irrelevant. The frame should be designed and built for the application; which a good bicycle designer can do using many different materials: various iron based alloys (aka steel); aluminum based alloys; magnesium; titanium; beryllium; carbon fiber; glass fiber; bamboo (grass); wood; thermal plastic; etc.

There are tons of opinions out there, a few are valid.

Choosing the frame material first is backwards. First make a list of all your requirements (musts/needs) and wants (would likes) for your touring bike. Then map components and accessories to that list. With your list; visit several custom frame builders, and pick the one that you feel the most comfortable with. And finally, discuss frame materials.
I agree with Nigel.....
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Old 07-10-14, 12:18 PM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by LeeG View Post
Only problem with that comparison is that a road bike isn't designed to carry weight over the rear wheel but on the saddle, pedals and bars.
That's true. But with a bagman support and a Carradice or similar saddlebag, load is effectively being borne by the saddle and seatpost. Admittedly the weight distribution is different, and I wouldn't want to load up that saddlebag with too much gear, but for ultralight touring it's absolutely fine. I've done some quite extensive credit-card tours in this configuration on a road bike with 25mm tyres, and been entirely comfortable.
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Old 07-10-14, 12:42 PM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
That's true. But with a bagman support and a Carradice or similar saddlebag, load is effectively being borne by the saddle and seatpost. Admittedly the weight distribution is different, and I wouldn't want to load up that saddlebag with too much gear, but for ultralight touring it's absolutely fine. I've done some quite extensive credit-card tours in this configuration on a road bike with 25mm tyres, and been entirely comfortable.
Agreed, I did most of my fast touring on road racing bikes in Ca. without tent or mess kit. Poncho, camp pad and sleeping bag on rack with small handlebar bag suspended between brake hoods on drop bars. 28mm tires were my training/touring tires. Now I'm a fat old phart not going fast anywhere and 35mm are preferable.
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