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Skewers for anti theft?

Old 08-20-14, 03:11 PM
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Skewers for anti theft?

I'm looking for some good, basic, cheap skewers. Just bought a new wheelset to put on my vintage 1987 panasonic pro touring and I dont want them getting stolen ( I will look the wheels up separately overnight)

Not looking for quick release - my rear hub is 130mm spaced - recommendations? Affordable is key - I have heard some people even superglue a ball bear into the hex slot to prevent a thief from removing them that way?
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Old 08-20-14, 03:18 PM
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I've used these slow release skewers for years/many thousands of miles. Nashbar sells a rebranded version of this exact same product, in silver or black:

Delta Axle Rodz non QR skewer set - AEBike.com

Nashbar Bolt-On Skewers - Normal Shipping Ground

These are very basic in that thief needs only a 5mm hex to remove - but still better security-wise than std QR.
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Old 08-20-14, 03:56 PM
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So you worry about them getting nicked at home before you leave on the trip?

I only have had issues in a couple cities , like CPH ..
it was a parts stripper ... rear brake mounting bolt taken out while I was peeing in a public Loo.. 5 minutes away..

I replaced the bolts, and took a Baltic ferry to Poland.

Last edited by fietsbob; 08-23-14 at 08:51 AM.
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Old 08-20-14, 04:43 PM
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Originally Posted by seeker333
I've used these slow release skewers for years/many thousands of miles. Nashbar sells a rebranded version of this exact same product, in silver or black:

Delta Axle Rodz non QR skewer set - AEBike.com

Nashbar Bolt-On Skewers - Normal Shipping Ground

These are very basic in that thief needs only a 5mm hex to remove - but still better security-wise than std QR.
+1 - I just installed some similar skewers on my Straggler. You can fill the hex key hole with Shoe Goo for a harder to steal, but still removable skewer.
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Old 08-20-14, 06:15 PM
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I used Halo XL skewers on a couple bikes with thick dropouts, but your 130mm spacing would likely work with the plane Halo skewers or just about any other ones out there. The Halo ones also use a 5mm wrench. The XL ones are extra long.

There are Pitlock and other brand of skewers that use a special key or special wrench. I however assumed that a thief is an opportunist and is unlikely to carry a 5mm allen wrench, thus I went that route. That means I also do not have to worry about losing a special key like the Pitlock key.

I have heard of people putting grease in the 5mm hole and then a ball bearing, the grease holds it in like glue, but with a wire or tweezers you can get the ball out. I have heard of other similar options too, but none come to mind right now. I however have just left the hole open. The shoe goo option listed above is interesting, I will have to think about that one.

At home I use the regular quick release, I only use the bolt on skewers for touring.

If you get the Halo brand ones, they take a little getting used to, there is only one spring per skewer, so you have to depress that spring to put the wheel on. But the advantage of them is that the nut end has a tab that keeps it from rotating when you put it on. That tab also takes a bit of getting used to, if you have the tab in the wrong place and you tighten them, the tab could get bent I chose Halo XO because I needed long ones for a couple bikes with thick dropouts, but otherwise I have nothing against the other brands.

I have heard of people tightening them too tight and eventually breaking a bolt on skewer. I am careful not to do that, I only tighten them enough to do the job. Just mentioning it since a breakage while on tour could immobilize you rather suddenly. Some use Aluminum nuts for the threads, those could also be stripped if you tightened them too much.
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Old 08-20-14, 06:41 PM
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don't recall the brands right now, but there are (were?) a few out there
that used torx wrenches instead of the standard hex keys.

other option is i think veloorange? they have (had?) bolt-ons that used a
5mm hex with a raised pin so couldn't use a standard solid hex key.
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Old 08-20-14, 07:19 PM
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I use Pit locks, as mentioned above.There not cheap though about $70.There not meant to be put on and taken off a lot.The metal washer can break easily.I like mine.

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Old 08-20-14, 11:27 PM
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I use skewers that require you to turn the bike upside down before they will unlock; the idea is that when your bike is locked properly, it will be impossible to flip it over. There are free moving beads inside the skewer which lock the levers by gravity.

Flipping the bike is a pain in the ass. It's your choice between that and tools.
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Old 08-22-14, 05:42 PM
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Originally Posted by saddlesores
other option is i think veloorange? they have (had?) bolt-ons that used a
5mm hex with a raised pin so couldn't use a standard solid hex key.
I've been using the VO offering for several years on my commuter bike:

VO Anti-theft Skewers

As saddlesores mentioned, they can't be opened with a standard hex key; instead, they use a "security" pattern, which are a little harder to find, but not a huge deal. (I got an extra security key, in fact an entire set, from Harbor Freight for just a few dollars.)
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Old 08-22-14, 05:49 PM
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I have never heard the grease idea in lieu of gluw for ball bearing installation. That may be worth looking into.

I use Pin Head Locks, but they are not necessarily cheap. But they are worth the piece of mind.
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Old 08-22-14, 09:14 PM
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Working at a bike shop, I've helped break several brands of locking skewers so we could fix a flat for the owners who lost the special keys. A screwdriver and hammer and a couple of whacks is all it takes to pop the suckers off. They're better than quck release though. I like the aforementioned axle rods with the 5mm hex end. Good enough for opportunity theft and very cheap.
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