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What is a "reasonable" touring bike weight?

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What is a "reasonable" touring bike weight?

Old 09-01-14, 04:51 PM
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What is a "reasonable" touring bike weight?

I tried the search function and merely got irritated.

What do you folks consider to be a reasonable weight for a touring bike, sans racks and bags? I just built a Specialized AWOL Comp frame using Campy Record 10 components, White hubs, and 700c rims. Forgot to mention the bloody Avid BB7 mechanical disc brakes. It rolls in at 27 lbs, and after riding it for the first time...its an f-ing pig, as in borderline no fun to ride. My other road bike is a Merlin, so I'm used to something that actually accelerates. I just did a credit card tour from Astoria-SF averaging 15 mph. I could ride this off a cliff and not hit 15 mph. Maybe my expectations need to lowered.

Thats why I'm asking.
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Old 09-01-14, 05:02 PM
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You're at it. Most naked touring bikes are around 30lbs. My trek 8.4 ds weight 31 with a suspension fork. BUT. You can put a rear rack on a Domane.
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Old 09-01-14, 05:14 PM
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Wonderful. Looks like I'm going to be investing in cuben fiber.
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Old 09-01-14, 05:36 PM
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the trouble is that the weight of the bike becomes less significant as the weight of the stuff you are carrying along becomes greater. if you want a light bike you need to carry a light load to make it worthwhile. about 50/50 bike weight to other stuff is not a bad ratio. others will disagree.
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Old 09-01-14, 06:13 PM
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Originally Posted by hueyhoolihan
the trouble is that the weight of the bike becomes less significant as the weight of the stuff you are carrying along becomes greater. if you want a light bike you need to carry a light load to make it worthwhile. about 50/50 bike weight to other stuff is not a bad ratio. others will disagree.
I agree. My bike is 19lbs and so is my gear.
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Old 09-01-14, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Nick94804
My other road bike is a Merlin, so I'm used to something that actually accelerates. I just did a credit card tour from Astoria-SF averaging 15 mph. I could ride this off a cliff and not hit 15 mph. Maybe my expectations need to lowered.

Thats why I'm asking.
You are never going to be excited by the acceleration of a fully loaded bike if you compare it to an unloaded bike. But a touring bike doesn't have to be a pig either. Look at your gear and see where you can lighten and reduce it. You can certainly do fully loaded touring on many endurance road bikes.
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Old 09-01-14, 06:21 PM
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Originally Posted by intransit1217
You're at it. Most naked touring bikes are around 30lbs. My trek 8.4 ds weight 31 with a suspension fork. BUT. You can put a rear rack on a Domane.
Why do you need a rack?
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Old 09-01-14, 06:24 PM
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My steel Miyata might get down to 26 if I use the lighter wheels and 23mm tires, dump the rear rack, etc...

I could care less if it hits 17 mph, which I can do on my carbon, 'cause I know that it'll go places the carbon never will. And carry what I need in the process.

I rode the Miyata for 500 miles and all over the Colorado Rockies on the Bike Tour of Colorado in '99. It was as light as I could make it and it was probably 8 lbs heavier then my Klein. It was the better choice and I'm still riding this bike 15 years later when the Klein is long gone.

Maybe for you a better choice might have been a sport tourer or a cross bike, something designed to carry light loads ?.
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Old 09-01-14, 06:29 PM
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Originally Posted by nun
Why do you need a rack?
i was comparing two unloaded bikes. One a racing bike, the other a touring bike. I want to do the second half of the Coastal Route lightweight camping. No cooking gear. Just a tarp, sleeping bag, pad, spare set of riding kit, and camp clothes (shorts, long sleeved t, lightweight fleece sweater and flippies). I'm not into arguing about what I'm taking. Its damn minimal. I can't haul that stuff on the Merlin, hence the AWOL. I'm also not going to wear a backpack. So, we're talking a rack of some kind.
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Old 09-01-14, 07:38 PM
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I'm kind of surprised you didn't like your awol. They have a decked out one (with a decked out price) at Ben's in Milwaukee. Those extended tpr brake hoods are the nicest kit...get your whole hand on the damn things.
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Old 09-01-14, 07:47 PM
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I have a touring bike that is 28 Lbs and another that is 18.

The 28 pound pig has 48 spoked wheels used for self sufficient loaded touring. Mod 58 rims, 14g spokes, bar cons, DefCon5 tires, and a beefy frame whereas the 18 pounder is a carbon fiber cross frame that can take big tires, fenders and front/rear racks if desired but I would not put traditional panniers on it. A HB bag and a large Revelate seat bag is sufficient for light touring (sleeping in a bed every night).
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Old 09-01-14, 08:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Nick94804
i was comparing two unloaded bikes. One a racing bike, the other a touring bike. I want to do the second half of the Coastal Route lightweight camping. No cooking gear. Just a tarp, sleeping bag, pad, spare set of riding kit, and camp clothes (shorts, long sleeved t, lightweight fleece sweater and flippies). I'm not into arguing about what I'm taking. Its damn minimal. I can't haul that stuff on the Merlin, hence the AWOL. I'm also not going to wear a backpack. So, we're talking a rack of some kind.
Why can't you use the Merlin? I use a Cervelo RS and don't use a rack or backpack, just saddlebag and handlebar bag. I carry a single walled tent and cooking gear in addition to the things you mention. Take a look at the bags made for bikepacking as a solution to carry stuff on a bike not set up for racks. If you do need a rack there are seat post and p-clamp mounted racks that can carry around 20lbs.
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Old 09-01-14, 08:21 PM
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All my multi week touting was done with a classic stage race bike, as they were from the late sixties through the seventies. Bikes were 531 or Columbus tubing, and with the components of the time came in at about 21#. With today's hardware it should be possible to bring in a nice responsive bike at under 20# without trying very hard.

BTW- it's not as much the weight as how the bike actually rides. If you're used to riding responsive bikes, there's no reason to give that up just to tour. IMO the only differences between a good stage race, or decent road bike and a decent touring bike are things that shouldn't affect the ride; wider tire clearances, fender/rack eyes, lateral stiffness in the rear end, and the like.

For a frame of reference, I gave up panniers decades ago, and do all my touring with a large classic saddle bag supported on a full rack. With sleeping bag & ultralight tent, it all makes a tight bundle that I attach so the CoG is very close to the saddle, and the bike handles fairly normally. If I tour solo, it's mostly no camping, and when touring with a few friends "community" stuff is spread among us. Total luggage weight is kept under 25#s.
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Old 09-01-14, 08:22 PM
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Before you discard your new expensive bike, you should ride it with weight over long distances for a couple of days. That's when the qualities of a good touring bike show. It will never ride right compared to your racing bike on a day trip without the additional weight of racks, panniers, etc. Weight is a pretty meaningless criterion for how a bike rides in any case; as long as the bike is built right, the weight will be fine for its intended use.
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Old 09-01-14, 08:29 PM
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Maybe the engine isn't as strong as you thought. Still, 15 mph average is not slow for touring. 150 miles in 10 hours of riding.
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Old 09-01-14, 08:35 PM
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My 520 comes in at about 27# with rear rack attached... I'd call that average for a touring bike. It's still a joy to ride anywhere but a cx course with 28mm tires mounted when I'm in commuting mode and not touring mode.

Not sure why you can't ride 15mph, I would imagine an awol would go faster than a 520. I can easily ride 25mph unloaded on flat pavement. Honestly, I don't even notice the weight nor do I think it's excessive. What I don't like about my touring bike is that it's no fun to ride around in the grass, up a small embankment, up and down stairs, etc. But, that's not what it's built for either. On the other hand, I have more bikes now and plan to retire my touring bike from multi-use bike to straight touring and keep wider tires, fenders, and lower gearing on it for when I load it down. I think it helps that I took the opposite approach as you... my first legitimate road bike was a touring bike, so I got used to riding that before moving onto something more racy and aggressive which I suppose gives me the ability to appreciate my touring bike for what it is.

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Old 09-01-14, 09:02 PM
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I concur that 27 lbs is pretty typical for a touring bike. Keep in mind that the AWOL is also an "adventure tourer" type bike, which means it's designed as much for off-road as on-road.

However, it's important to recognize that weight is not the only factor here, and probably not the most critical. The more important factors are:

1) The tires are almost certainly wider, heavier, more robust, less supple, more rolling resistance etc.
2) The position is almost certainly more upright.
3) The geometry is designed to be more stable, especially when loaded.
4) Other aspects are less aerodynamic, notably the wheels.

And of course, it's always possible a brake pad is rubbing, or there's some other subtle mechanical issue you haven't noticed yet.

But, the reality is that most touring-specific bikes will feel like a truck, and most won't feel great when unloaded. They are designed to haul gear, not haul ass.
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Old 09-01-14, 09:04 PM
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Nick94804, Are you sure there's nothing mechanical holding you back? My touring bikes are 26 and 26.5 lb. and while they accelerate less rapidly than my roadies, the 26.5 lb. bike, when unloaded, isn't markedly slower nor harder to maintain speed than the roadie once up to cruising speed.

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Old 09-01-14, 09:23 PM
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I think you are 1-2 lbs under what is typical. You shouldn't really be worrying about speed. Averaging 10-11 mph is fairly typical. Do you have a tread pattern on your tires that might be making the bike feel sluggish? I think you might get used to the "SUV" feel of the touring bike with time. Or as others have suggested you could pack light and take your road bike and carry gear as nun suggested above. I prefer the cushier ride of wider tires on my touring bike not to mention fewer flats and wider tires are a bit safer IMO.
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Old 09-01-14, 09:42 PM
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Wheel weight, tire weight and tire construction may be the largest factors in how a bike feels.

I have one bike with moderately heavy rims and a set of Contnental "Touring Plus" tires. The tires are heavy and stiff. The change to the touring tires from Gatorskins made a huge difference in the feel of the bike. The lighter tires gave a better ride and the bike was easier to accelerate. However, the touring tires are difficult to puncture and, for my purposes, that is worth the difference.

Rim and tire weight disproportionately affect acceleration because wheel weight requires twice the energy to get up to a given speed when compared to non-rotating parts of the bike.

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Old 09-01-14, 10:49 PM
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The more I think about it, the more the OP numbers don't make sense to me. I average about 15mph on my touring bike when I'm touring, because I want to take in the scenery. It's no problem going up to 25mph and maintaining that (unloaded) for a couple of hours on flat pavement. On a downhill, the thing rides itself to about 35+mph... I definitely think there is something wrong with the AWOL that it's having a hard time getting-to/holding 15mph, that just isn't right.

As I said above (edited my original post a bit), a touring bike doesn't hold back my top speed at all (except for maybe climbing a steep hill). It's no fun to ride it at a walking speed (very hard to keep a line while going slow) and I'm not going to carve any canyons on it at speed. I'm not going to ride it like a BMX bike (I ride CX as if it were a BMX bike). It's not going to make for a fun sprinting bike. No, a touring bike is limited and lacks fun on a lot of fronts... but my top speed isn't one of them.
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Old 09-01-14, 11:05 PM
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My bike is about 30 lbs or so without rack now with some upgrades I have done. It sucks but considering it is a fully loaded rig designed to carry a lot of weight (including my fat ass), I don't mind. I don't want to credit card tour (or use credit cards) and I don't want to sacrifice durability and capability. I will keep my fixed gear and my Cilo nice and light but my DT is basically my SUV (though in this one I am actually hauling stuff and not guzzling gas). Touring is not about livin' dat fast lyfe it is about enjoying life and getting away from it all.
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Old 09-01-14, 11:21 PM
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My Kuwahara Cascade weighs 32 pounds with racks and fenders... load it to the nuts and it is as stable and comfortable as it gets or you can run it naked and crank it up on the road.

Despite their weight the Schwalbe hurricanes roll out like a road tyre and have been absolutely bulletproof over 12,000 km +... the custom built wheels roll out like butter on glass.

It also handles trails and gravel and saw some of that this past weekend where I was loaded to the nuts and the folks on the lighter bikes with their skinny tyres were not having a good time while I barely had to check my speed and bet I was less beat up afterwards.

On high speed descents I also had no worries... the bike tracks like it is on rails.



With a full load and front panniers wind resistance will cut your speed and make hill climbing a scenic affair.

Droppingthe front pannier for lighter running and better aerodynamics and the flat speed will goe up considerably.



Using it to commute to the main shop I was regularly covering the 50km in 2 hours with a quick coffee break in the middle... even then I'd have two lightly loaded panniers.
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Old 09-01-14, 11:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Nick94804
What do you folks consider to be a reasonable weight for a touring bike, sans racks and bags? I just built a Specialized AWOL Comp frame using Campy Record 10 components, White hubs, and 700c rims. Forgot to mention the bloody Avid BB7 mechanical disc brakes. It rolls in at 27 lbs, and after riding it for the first time...its an f-ing pig, as in borderline no fun to ride.
My touring bike weighs 23lbs without racks, luggage, or water bottles. I built the bike primarily for credit card and light touring: Nashbar aluminum frame, Ultegra triple drive-train, Vittoria Voyager Hyper tires, and light yet durable wheels (Velocity Synergy rims, XTR hubs, DT Competition spokes x 32). Unloaded, it's only fractionally slower than my 17lb carbon fiber endurance road bike.

A few things to remember about touring bikes:

1) The geometry of a touring bike means that it will never handle like a race bike. The long wheelbase and frame geometry are designed to make the bike handle predictably with a load. Even unloaded, the geometry will ensure that the bike steers like a truck

2) Aerodynamics of touring bikes are generally poor. Even without racks and panniers the long head tube and high-rise stem will mean that you're probably sitting more upright on a touring bike than you would on a race bike. The faster you try to ride, the more of a penalty this will become

3) Tires can make a big difference when it comes to perceived speed. Want to go fast? I'm a big fan of the Vittoria Voyager Hyper and Vittoria Randonneur Pro tires...
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Old 09-01-14, 11:52 PM
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I understand what the OP is saying. I have two bike set up for touring, Surly LHT and a Bianchi Volpe, The have identical drive trains except the LHT trucker has XT hubs and the Bianchi has 105's. The spokes, rims, brakes, saddles, and tires are the same. The LHT is the "dog" of the two bikes. I was riding the Bianchi with my wife yesterday, and commented on how I could feel the almost instant response to pedaling input. With the LHT the response is not really felt. Sure, it will eventually respond to input, and get up to speed, but there is a real, different feel between the 2 bikes. The LHT is about 3-4 pounds heavier, about 32 lbs, but I don't think that is the difference. Consequently, I'm planning on taking the Bianchi on a tour we are starting in a couple of weeks. It is just more fun to ride.
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