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Touring crank

Old 12-04-14, 08:00 PM
  #1  
jargo432
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Touring crank

I'm looking for a good crankset for my bike build. I had a bid on ebay for a shimano xt 26/36/48 175mm crankset with the BB and lost it in the last 2 seconds. (went for $98) I can never seem to win on ebay. (starting to think it's rigged)

Looking for advice on best place to buy and any other thoughts on good cranksets. It's so hard to find exactly what I want in the online stores.

Thanks
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Old 12-04-14, 08:29 PM
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I just bought a current model Deore Crank 22/32/44 w/BB on Amazon for under $90. It's for my Stratus recumbent, but it would be equally at home on a loaded touring bike.http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-FC-M59...deore+crankset
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Old 12-04-14, 10:39 PM
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with xt, you're paying for a slightly nicer polish, and a few grams less weight.
deore, dx, lx, all are fine and will last forever.

another groovy choice is the sugina-AT triple.

and about that xt you were looking at, are those the rings you want for your tour?
i'd think a 22T inner would be a better choice than a 26T.
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Old 12-04-14, 11:18 PM
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How about this Deore from amazon. Same crank length and rings.

Amazon.com : Shimano FC-M590 Deore Hollowtech II Crankset (Black, 175-mm 48/36/26T 9 Speed) : Bike Cranksets And Accessories : Sports & Outdoors
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Old 12-05-14, 06:59 AM
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jargo432, For loaded touring a crank set with 22-32-42T chain rings is an excellent starting point. I favor Shimano and Sugino crank sets and both of my touring bikes have Sugino triples (22-32-44T and 24-34-42T). As to shopping, I just use a generic brand search and determine who has what I want at the best price at that moment.

Brad
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Old 12-05-14, 11:04 AM
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Rivendell sells these cranks:

Cranks, Chainrings

Harris sells many triple cranksets. Both Harris and Rivendell have friendly, helpful people answering the phone, and I'm sure that they would be happy to talk with you about your needs.

Cranksets - Harris Cyclery bicycle shop - West Newton, Massachusetts

My local used bike parts emporium, Recycled Cycles, has a variety of decent used cranks for cheap (just got a Sugino AT in excellent condition for $15), and I believe they do mail order. They probably still have the nice 175mm Sugino RT set that I returned to them last weekend.

Recycled Cycles | Seattle's Used Bike Shop |

Last edited by Dfrost; 12-05-14 at 11:07 AM.
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Old 12-05-14, 11:13 AM
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Make sure you get a road crank for a road bike and a mountain bike crank for a mountain bike. The spindle lengths are different between the two with traditional English threaded BB shells.

Deore is just as good as XT. Shimano Sora is the road version of Deore, and that's what I use, and it's great!
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Old 12-05-14, 11:15 AM
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Hard to beat the prices from the UK for shimano stuff. Second the recommendation of a sugino xd 600; that's a fine crank.
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Old 12-05-14, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by jargo432 View Post
I'm looking for a good crankset for my bike build. I had a bid on ebay for a shimano xt 26/36/48 175mm crankset with the BB and lost it in the last 2 seconds. (went for $98) I can never seem to win on ebay. (starting to think it's rigged)

Looking for advice on best place to buy and any other thoughts on good cranksets. It's so hard to find exactly what I want in the online stores.

Thanks
Shimano trekking cranks can be hard to find in the US. They seem to be more popular in Europe. I just ordered an Deore 48/36/26 from Bike Discount out of Belgium for $70. With shipping, the cost comes to $90.
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Old 12-05-14, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Make sure you get a road crank for a road bike and a mountain bike crank for a mountain bike. The spindle lengths are different between the two with traditional English threaded BB shells.

Deore is just as good as XT. Shimano Sora is the road version of Deore, and that's what I use, and it's great!
A mountain bike crank can be used on a road bike (I've been using Ritchey Logic "mountain bike" triple cranks on road bikes for the last 22 years). But the spindle length difference is appropriate if the bike in question has chainstays that bow outward to clear wider tires.

Sheldon Brown's tech article has a guide for bottom bracket spindle lengths for many older cranks:

Sheldon Brown's Bottom Bracket Size Database
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Old 12-05-14, 02:10 PM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by Dfrost View Post
A mountain bike crank can be used on a road bike (I've been using Ritchey Logic "mountain bike" triple cranks on road bikes for the last 22 years). But the spindle length difference is appropriate if the bike in question has chainstays that bow outward to clear wider tires.

Sheldon Brown's tech article has a guide for bottom bracket spindle lengths for many older cranks:

Sheldon Brown's Bottom Bracket Size Database
+1 If the crank is an external bottom bracket model, you adjust the chainline with spacers on the bearing cups.
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Old 12-05-14, 10:21 PM
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Make sure you get a road crank for a road bike and a mountain bike crank for a mountain bike. The spindle lengths are different between the two with traditional English threaded BB shells.

Deore is just as good as XT. Shimano Sora is the road version of Deore, and that's what I use, and it's great!
They are actually interchangeable. Mix and match as you like; "road" and "mountain" are marketing terms and you can put road components on an MTB and mountain components on a road bike. Most people opt for a triple crankset on their road bikes simply because having that granny gear makes climbing a lot easier but then you have to change to a long-cage derailleur to take up the extra slack.
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Old 12-06-14, 08:07 AM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by NormanF View Post
They are actually interchangeable. Mix and match as you like; "road" and "mountain" are marketing terms and you can put road components on an MTB and mountain components on a road bike. ...
There are enough differences to segregate mountain and road groups to the niche they serve. Handle bar diameter and BB shell width are two. Back on topic, installation instructions for the two piece Shimano crank sets include the use of 2.5 mm spacers in order to adapt a crank set intended for a 73 mm wide BB shell to a 68 mm wide BB shell.

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Old 12-06-14, 08:19 AM
  #14  
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I have been a big fan of Suguino XD 600 26/36/46. Comes in 165/170/175 length. Runs a bit over $100. I have over 26k miles and the rings are still good.
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Old 12-06-14, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by bradtx View Post
There are enough differences to segregate mountain and road groups to the niche they serve. Handle bar diameter and BB shell width are two.
That's not really valid any more...if it were every really valid. Handlebar diameter has settled in on 31.8mm but before that, 25.4mm was mostly the standard. There were a few weird diameters in the old days but the majority of road and mountain bikes used 25.4mm bars.

As for bottom bracket shells, I wonder why they bother to design bottom brackets for 73mm shells. I have 5 mountain bikes of my own and 2 mountain bikes for family members in my garage right now and none of them have 73 mm bottom bracket shells. I've owned around 25 mountain bikes over the years and not one of them has had a 73mm bottom bracket shell. I work on bike at my local co-op every Saturday...and have for about 4 years...and I haven't seen a single 73mm bottom bracket in hundreds to thousands of bikes.

Shimano feels the need to segregate road and mountain. Out here in the real world, we've found that those designations aren't as important as Shimano thinks...although Dynasys has killed the mixing of components
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Old 12-06-14, 10:34 AM
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Sugino triple cranks are great. Do a search and you should be able to find a brand new one for $125 or so, or try your luck on eBay.

BTW, if you want to win more auctions on eBay then use a sniping service. Decide what is the most you would be willing to pay, set your bid to submit about 5-10 seconds before the end of the auction, and see what happens. I win a higher percentage of eBay auctions using a sniper. If I don't win, then the product sold for more than I was willing to pay. The one is use is called Myibidder.com
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Old 12-06-14, 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
That's not really valid any more...if it were every really valid. Handlebar diameter has settled in on 31.8mm but before that, 25.4mm was mostly the standard. There were a few weird diameters in the old days but the majority of road and mountain bikes used 25.4mm bars.

As for bottom bracket shells, I wonder why they bother to design bottom brackets for 73mm shells. I have 5 mountain bikes of my own and 2 mountain bikes for family members in my garage right now and none of them have 73 mm bottom bracket shells. ...
As for the handle bars I was referring to the working end diameter, not the clamping area. My '98 Trek 7000ZX has a 73 mm wide BB shell.

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Old 12-06-14, 12:41 PM
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Yeah, let me be clear; I 100% agree that mountain and road are interchangeable terms. Everything is just "bike parts."

My touring bike is a road Cyclocross rig from Raleigh. I currently use:

Mountain:
Mavic A719 rims
XT hubs (front and rear)
XT Derailleur
XT 11-36T cassette
XT Chain
RaceFace 38T Chainring
Easton seatpost
WTB Pure-V seat

Road:
Nitto Randonneur handlebars
Cane Creek brakes
Dura-Ace bar-end shifter
Sora cranks

Unspecified:
Praxis Works bottom bracket

Almost all of my components are mountain, except for my handlebar setup. Mountain stuff is A++ for touring. If you don't want to space your BB, though, which I don't like to do for simplicity, it might behoove one to stick to the crankset designed for your BB shell, since the difference between a Sora crankset and a Deore crankset is in the name, and the chainring bolt pattern, and not in durability or longevity.
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Old 12-06-14, 03:40 PM
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Playing at the auction site? 80's XT M730 74-110 cranks are good ..

the M900 of the same era are more sought after Uses a Shorter BB , as the crank design is such to do that.

Got a Campag Olympus from the same era before they dropped the MTB sector entirely ..

Mavic had a super MTB set as well back then. 637was the crank all 74-110.

Last edited by fietsbob; 12-06-14 at 03:46 PM.
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Old 12-06-14, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
...although Dynasys has killed the mixing of components
Ain't that the truth. While Sram now seems slightly intent on making things more compatible, Shimano seems to be going the other way. Thanks again Shimano !
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Old 12-07-14, 12:44 AM
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I am considering the Sugino XD600 which other folks have mentioned for a touring bike I am thinking about. I know folks with 75s on their track/fixed gear bikes and love them and I have a sugino messenger crank on mine which is nice. Plus it is the right gearing and is square taper which I think is quite useful for touring because it is easier to replace around the world and has proven durability. Deore isn't a bad bet either especially older stuff because before it found a home in MTB riding it used to be Shimano's touring gruppo. Though it looks like the modern stuff is going towards octalink even their track stuff is now octalink.

BACK IN MY DAY...
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Old 12-07-14, 05:20 AM
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I think the crank set up depends a lot on personal preference, followed by the type of touring one does. I've a Bianchi Volpe with 50-39-30 crank. I immediately replaced it with 44-32-22, before the bike left the shop, and have been very happy with it. The bike left the shop weighing10.9kg, without even bottle cages. I use it for up to light touring in fair weather only, with light tent, sleeping bag, but no cooking.

Coming from road bike back ground, I still lust for lighter touring, from SAG up to credit card level. I won't be carrying sleeping gear, and hope to limit the load to <10 kg. I've already ordered a CF CX frame with eyelets for racks from China. I intend to get VO Grand Cru 50.4 BCD Crankset MK II 46/30 rings, and SRAM PG 1050 Cassette 12-32: 12-13-14-15-17-19-22-25-28-32.

After it's completed, I may consider putting 12-36t cassette with appropriate RD for Bianchi Volpe.

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Old 12-07-14, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by bradtx View Post
As for the handle bars I was referring to the working end diameter, not the clamping area.
With the exception of Juliana handlebars, I can't think of a single handlebar that is a different diameter at the "working end". Road and mountain bikes use the same outside diameter at the ends of the bars. That diameter fits the hands of most adult males...hence the Juliana which fits women's hands better.

Originally Posted by bradtx View Post
My '98 Trek 7000ZX has a 73 mm wide BB shell.
I didn't say that there are no 73mm BB shells out there just that they are very rare.
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Old 12-07-14, 11:22 AM
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BB shells on MTBs went to 73, a bit more width for spreading to fit fatter tires ..

new Fat Bike frames spread that to 100..

Octalink is giving way to External Bearing BB's with Tube spindles .. these days..

Last edited by fietsbob; 12-07-14 at 11:25 AM.
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Old 12-07-14, 07:30 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
BB shells on MTBs went to 73, a bit more width for spreading to fit fatter tires ..
Not many did. Granted the majority of my mountain bikes have been Specialized but I have also owned Bianchi, Burley, KHS, Moots and Trek as well and not one of them has had a 73mm bottom bracket. And I have seen thousands of bikes come through my co-op and seldom see a 73mm bottom bracket shell.
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