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Touring Tool List/ spare list with a rohloff

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Touring Tool List/ spare list with a rohloff

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Old 12-05-14, 09:38 AM
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Traagstad
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Touring Tool List/ spare list with a rohloff

As ive decided to get one of them Thorn Nomads for touing bike, Im starting to wonder what kind of tool list and spares list would you take with you for going around the world with a rohloff? Any recommendation for better spec is also appreciated.
Bike spec is gonna be

Thorn nomad mk2 frame fork

Flat track bars
Ergon GP1 grips
Rohloff shifter
Zoom ski bends

Black Rohloff hub
32 Son 28 Black
Andra 30 CSS rims
schwalbe marathon Dureme 2.0"
Shimano deore V brakes F&R
Sks P65 mudguards black

Shimano Deore 104BCD integral bb axle and external bearings
19T thorn sprocket
Thorn 104 BCD chainring

Brooks Honey B17

Cat eye rear light
Buch&Muller front light

Thorn expedition front rack
Thorn mk5 lo loader front rack
thorn 105mm accessory bar
Profile design Kage bottle cages 3x
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Old 12-05-14, 10:55 AM
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You got the internal shift type like this?
Rohloff Speedhub > Components > Wheels > Hubs | Jenson USA
or External shift Box type like this?
Rohloff Disc-Speedhub 500/14 TS/DB, B-O 32h red, Hubs

the Internal the short cable with the 2 Bayonets on the end may break .
the external one uses gears to rotate the shift sequencer . so just 2 regular shift cables are involved ..
if either does fail an 8mm wrench will change gears turning the shift cam end

Spare spoke or 2 and some for the front .. chain tool maybe some spare links (1/8" Chain or 3/32" will do )

maybe have a clean and re lube oil change kit, as a care package ready to Mail to you, a year off. [ it includes a new filler plug screw]

I put a Piece of Tape over the oil change set-screw , last time I changed my oil .

Their cog removal tool will let you Flip the cog over to wear 2X as long (except the 13t)


The recent 36 hole Hubshell was made as an Option, because People rode the Hubs in Tandems .

so now you can build a 3 cross 36 hole wheel The designated build is 2 cross. with the 32 hole ,
though the Koga WTR I Got the factory tried a 3 cross , [could have worked if they got the lacing pattern Right.]

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Old 12-05-14, 11:21 AM
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A good starting place would be page 20.
http://www.sjscycles.com/thornpdf/Th...loff_LoRes.pdf

I would not bring everything on that list but I would bring a few things that are not on it. I would use this as a guide, but add and subtract as I see fit.

That list says one spare tube, I would bring several tubes. Sometimes you get a problem with a tube, like the valve stem separates from the rubber and a patch won't fix that.

I do not cut my spare cables cut to length. I have two sections of plastic drinking straw, each measured to 100mm, the two together give me the 200mm that I need to measure the cable for changing a Rohloff cable.

I carry some Tyvek cut from post office envelopes to use as a tire boot if I cut a tire.

I carry my spare spokes in my seatpost, I use a wine cork to keep them in the post. The wine cork dried out and shrunk, so I wrapped some electrical tape around it to make it fit tighter.

Most multi-tools do not have a T20 wrench. I would bring two in case I lost one. Needed to change a Rohloff cable.

I prefer Presta over Shrader. I have my rims drilled to Shrader and the little stem saver thingys in them to convert the rims to Presta. Thus if I am in Shrader land and that is all I can buy, not a problem. I also carry two Presta to Shrader adapters so I can use a Shrader pump on my Presta valves. But if you use Shrader only, skip this.
Presta | Stem | Savers | Bicycle

External bottom bracket, I would not have picked that but you already did. So, think about how you would fix that if you need to.

A few spare chain links.

Spare M6 bolts, including one that could be used if you snap a seatpost bolt. Nomad uses M6 bolts for rack and fender stays, not the more common M5.

Note to Fietsbob, Nomads come with the EX box,

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Old 12-05-14, 12:29 PM
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Just go over the whole bike and make a list of every fastener on it, or process. Then subtract stuff you don't know how to fix, or practically speaking nobody would carry the tools to fix. Add back in anything that even with those restraints you would be nuts to go around the world without, and just learn how to use it, etc...

In addition make a list of anything that you can swap out to make maintenance easier, brakes are an area where you can either have a small case full of tools, or reduce to a few keys, depending on the product.

If you are getting this bike built custom, get them to swap out the small rack bolts for 6mm threaded ones, and equip the bike with those. That is probably one of the weakest systems on the bike, particularly if you are carrying a heavy load. If you are running light, might be ok.

Multi tools and other people's list are not that useful on the road. You need to customize your list for the tool load you can carry, and shared tooling you might take among a group, the bike you actually own, and the repairs you can reasonably undertake. Rohloff lists make sense since that is one part that all of the respondents so far have more or less in common.
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Old 12-05-14, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by MassiveD View Post
If you are getting this bike built custom, get them to swap out the small rack bolts for 6mm threaded ones, and equip the bike with those. That is probably one of the weakest systems on the bike, particularly if you are carrying a heavy load. If you are running light, might be ok.
I've never seen a bike that takes M6 screws at the dropouts. Care to share?
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Old 12-05-14, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Yan View Post
I've never seen a bike that takes M6 screws at the dropouts. Care to share?
The Nomad that he will be using does use M6 bolts as I noted above where I suggested he carry some spare M6 bolts. The rear actually has a weird fitting on each rear dropout that mounts to the frame with two M5 bolts, then you use M6 bolts to install your rack to those weird fittings. The odd part is that the Nomad even uses M6 bolts for fenders which are not high stress bolts.
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Old 12-05-14, 05:03 PM
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For the load bearing Bottom Of the rack Bolts I chose 8.8 marked Hex heads , a Higher strength steel , for the M5..

maybe they thought bigger was more impressive .. 6x1 would torque tighter than 5x.8 if using the same steel , say stainless .

teeth are coarser in 1 per mm than 0.8 per mm.


But at least SJS is prepared to ship around the Globe if you need stuff. In Route.

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Old 12-06-14, 06:37 AM
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Spares/tools specifically for the Rohloff:

- 15 mm wrench or adjustable wrench that will spin the nut to take your wheel off, providing you have a bolt on axle.
- Sprocket tool. Carry one as few bikes shops have even seen a Rohloff let alone would have this tool.
- Single Speed Chain tool. Strangely a pain in the butt to find these in some areas.

- Couple spokes.
- Budget for a chain every 5000 km or so. People have gone a lot further on a chain, but at the expense of your sprockets.
- Sprockets every 10000 to 15000 km or so....
- Few of the T20 screws for the External Gear Box. These like to be lost, stripped and broken
- Most importantly, carry a few of the rubber shifter grips. They recently changed them again and seem to be a bit more durable, but I've gone through several of them. Actually, it's the one issue/gripe I have against Rohloff's. I wish the rubber would last me longer than 9000 km.
- Buy your hub oil in bulk and split it up into smaller bottles yourself. Way cheaper than buying 1 change kit at a time.

You mentioned your getting a Thorn, so it will be V brakes, but consider getting the disc version of the Rohloff instead incase you swap frames in the future. They do however use a special Rohloff specific disc rotor, carry spares if needed.

About it really. Welcome to the world of not worrying about drivetrain breaking yet worrying if you destroy your rim if you can find a builder that can build a proper wheel with a Rohloff.....

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Old 12-06-14, 11:33 AM
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Originally Posted by SparkyGA View Post
Spares/tools specifically for the Rohloff:
...
- Most importantly, carry a few of the rubber shifter grips. They recently changed them again and seem to be a bit more durable, but I've gone through several of them. Actually, it's the one issue/gripe I have against Rohloff's. I wish the rubber would last me longer than 9000 km.
...
Have you considered putting some Shoe Gu on it? I notice you are in Japan, but perhaps they have something like it there?
Sof Sole Shoe Goo

I have the round shifter, when my hands are sweaty and I am not wearing gloves, I have trouble getting a grip on it. I put a bead of Shoe Goo on the shifter, it helps me get a grip on it.
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Old 12-06-14, 12:18 PM
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you mean people are buying ridiculously priced hubs and then STILL are carrying spare parts and special bike tools to fix them?
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Old 12-06-14, 08:48 PM
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I would carry no spare parts...it's a Rohloff. I would just do scheduled maintenance via mail-drops. You're getting a nicely overbuilt touring bike, why lug backup junk around the world?
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Old 12-07-14, 05:37 AM
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For all the extra muscles ill gain dont want to make it too easy would we now
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Old 12-07-14, 10:45 AM
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I don't see how M6 offers any real world advantages over M5 but I can see some disadvantages. The M6 excels in shear strength but based on anecdotal evidence shearing is not the common failure mode. The common failure is due to the engagement or lake thereof at the dropouts which is worsened with the coarser pitch of M6 screws. Also being that most racks are designed for M5 screws the holes may require enlargement, potentially weakening the rack.
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Old 12-07-14, 11:07 AM
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15mm short handled Pedal Wrench was useful to get my bike (any) Boxed for travel and re assembled when I got off the airplane or Amtrak

assuming the pedal used a 15mm wrench there are 6mm and 8mm allen wrench only, fitted pedals too. they use the end socket.in the spindle

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Old 12-07-14, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Bezalel View Post
I don't see how M6 offers any real world advantages over M5 but I can see some disadvantages. The M6 excels in shear strength but based on anecdotal evidence shearing is not the common failure mode. The common failure is due to the engagement or lake thereof at the dropouts which is worsened with the coarser pitch of M6 screws. Also being that most racks are designed for M5 screws the holes may require enlargement, potentially weakening the rack.
Thorn rates their rear rack for weight depending on which bolts used, I pasted this from their website: Max load when used on surfaced roads:- When fitted with 6mm screws = 60Kg…when fitted with 5mm screws = 40kg. These figures should be halved when being used on South American Ripio.

Copied and pasted from:
Thorn Expedition Steel Rear cycle pannier rack - B - 89.99

I personally do not think I have ever had more than about 25 kg on my rear rack, but some people carry more. When I bought my Nomad, I did not buy their rack, I use a lighter duty rack myself. I had to ream out rack bolt holes for the 6mm bolts, but I did not cause any weakness in the process. Realistically I would be more worried about front rack bolts than rear because if you crash I can imagine the front bolts taking a lot of stress. But the question really becomes - if you are in outer mongolia, do you really want to risk a rack failure when a couple slightly more robust bolts might have been enough?

On a different topic, the bolts used to tighten or loosen the eccentric that is used to adjust the chain are 15mm. Thus, the wrench that is supplied with the bike for the eccentric has 15mm wrench flats that can be used on most pedals unless they are the allen wrench only type pedals. When I bought my Nomad, I bought a spare wrench, one to keep on the bike in my bike took kit and one to keep in my tool box.
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Old 12-07-14, 07:02 PM
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I suppose that the failures at 60Kg are very different than the failures at 25Kg. I still maintain that for the loads of most members of this forum a dropout with M5 screws will provide a better attachment than one with M6 screws.
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Old 12-08-14, 03:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
Have you considered putting some Shoe Gu on it? I notice you are in Japan, but perhaps they have something like it there?
Sof Sole Shoe Goo

I have the round shifter, when my hands are sweaty and I am not wearing gloves, I have trouble getting a grip on it. I put a bead of Shoe Goo on the shifter, it helps me get a grip on it.
Cool, I will have to try that when this current shifter rubber fails. I used rubber cement and a tube patch on my last shifter rubber to fix up a hole that developed in Vietnam. That method worked OK at best. Electrical tape DOES NOT WORK, to my great dismay. Kept slipping and moving around

They do have shoe glue in Japan. I've got a big tube of it to fix my SPD shoes
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Old 12-08-14, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by SparkyGA View Post
Cool, I will have to try that when this current shifter rubber fails. I used rubber cement and a tube patch on my last shifter rubber to fix up a hole that developed in Vietnam. That method worked OK at best. Electrical tape DOES NOT WORK, to my great dismay. Kept slipping and moving around

They do have shoe glue in Japan. I've got a big tube of it to fix my SPD shoes
Be careful to look at your shoe soles where they contact the pedal first to see where to not put any Shoe Goo on. I accidentally built up the sole on some of my cycle shoes where the sole sits on the pedal, I had to go back later and trim some of it off with a knife because it was harder to clip in because it pushed the cleat further up away from the pedal. But otherwise it is a great way to make your shoes last longer if the soles give out before the uppers.

I attached a photo of the bead of Shoe Goo I put on my shifter to give it a better grip. It left a glossy wrinkled surface, that is why it looks almost white in the photo, it reflected light off of the overcast sky. I initially planned to put three beads on it to be more like the older triangular shape, but once I put one bead on it I decided that was sufficient.

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Old 12-08-14, 01:12 PM
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Have any of you rohlof users thought of getting one of those doohickies that completely covers the front chain ring, chain and rear sprocket area?
I saw this in a CGOAB trip journal a few years ago, by the couple (Brits or Kiwis, can't recall) who put them on their super neat (and super pricey) front and rear suspension expedition bikes (Panamerica's ?)

You dont see people using this thing, so I imagine it is very expensive, but I think the idea is superb--it keeps all the dirt and crap off your drivetrain so your chain and rear sprocket would probably last many times more than if its exposed. Only downsize is how finicky it is to take off to remove rear wheel for a flat or whatever.

anyone know the name of it? I can't recall, but just like with 3 speed city bikes that used to have stamped out metal covers like this in the past (and probably still do) this certainly makes sense to cover up the drivetrain--I mean, one of the whole reasons behind an igh is to not deal with derailleur wear and all that, so its logical to me to cover it all up--especially if you are going on an extended tour in all kinds of dirt and mud.

I always come back to the point that these must be very expensive and perhaps have to be specialized for a given frame shape, who knows. Seems to be such a smart thing in any case, and even if it doesnt fit perfectly, eliminating 80 or 90% of gunge off your drivetrain over time will always have a working benefit as well as monetary benefit of greatly extending when you have to change chain and rear cog.
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Old 12-08-14, 01:58 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
Have any of you rohlof users thought of getting one of those doohickies that completely covers the front chain ring, chain and rear sprocket area?
I saw this in a CGOAB trip journal a few years ago, by the couple (Brits or Kiwis, can't recall) who put them on their super neat (and super pricey) front and rear suspension expedition bikes (Panamerica's ?)

You dont see people using this thing, so I imagine it is very expensive, but I think the idea is superb--it keeps all the dirt and crap off your drivetrain so your chain and rear sprocket would probably last many times more than if its exposed. Only downsize is how finicky it is to take off to remove rear wheel for a flat or whatever.

anyone know the name of it? I can't recall, but just like with 3 speed city bikes that used to have stamped out metal covers like this in the past (and probably still do) this certainly makes sense to cover up the drivetrain--I mean, one of the whole reasons behind an igh is to not deal with derailleur wear and all that, so its logical to me to cover it all up--especially if you are going on an extended tour in all kinds of dirt and mud.

I always come back to the point that these must be very expensive and perhaps have to be specialized for a given frame shape, who knows. Seems to be such a smart thing in any case, and even if it doesnt fit perfectly, eliminating 80 or 90% of gunge off your drivetrain over time will always have a working benefit as well as monetary benefit of greatly extending when you have to change chain and rear cog.


this?

Hebie Chainglider for Rohloff - 39.99
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Old 12-08-14, 03:13 PM
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must be it. I figure it would pay for itself over time in chain and rear cog life for someone on the road a long long time in bad conditions often.

The cgoab journal couple liked it, as long as it doesnt rub on chain due to not mounting well, or moving over time and rubbing (making an annoying noise lets say) it seems to be a great idea.
Use a really long lasting chain oil like Chain-L and it would greatly reduce drivetrain maintenance also--- again, especially in really mucky crap. Its one thing cleaning a muddy drivetrain at home after a ride, but I'd appreciate this on an extended trip, just from the time savings, not to mention wear savings.

seems like a win-win to me (without knowing its build quality, how well it mounts and all that)
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