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Big kit list for long distance touring, long reading :)

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Big kit list for long distance touring, long reading :)

Old 12-10-14, 04:51 AM
  #26  
Traagstad
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I brought the guitar with me when touring around Ireland, (stuck down in 1 of the rear panniers, the thing was almost like a flag) And when I went into quiet Irish pubs I say ( Hey! what if i bring my guitar in here,yall cool with that??)
Always a big cheer when I took it out, and alot of free rounds of beer
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Old 12-10-14, 08:46 PM
  #27  
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This has been a good thread. Started with a nice list and lot's of input from experienced riders. I've learned quite a bit.
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Old 12-11-14, 03:49 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by SparkyGA View Post
- Don't use 4 panniers unless you absolutely need 4 panniers. If you end up with the BOB trailer, put stuff that would have been in the front panniers in trailer. Saves a lot of weight (2+ kg). Rear rack bags are a good option as well for extra capacity without adding a bunch of weight.
are you suggesting rear bags + trailer? i went the opposite (when i didn't have 4 bags + trailer). front bags and no rear bags to take some weight off the rear wheel, as you'll still be
adding to the rear load with the trailer.

i dragged a loaded bob for about 20K miles. never a spoke problem since the weight should
be under the 70lb rating. carry a spare tire, ziptied to the underside of the trailer. the only
trailer size tires you're likely to find will be knobbly bmx tires.

note the bob hub is kinda crappy. be prepared to repack/replace the ball bearings at an
inconvenient time, like when the bearings sieze up during a snowstorm....
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Old 12-11-14, 04:56 AM
  #29  
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Haha, that sounds like a fun time!
But really great tips man, how much/ what spare would you suggest having in backhand to bring a BoB trailer round the world? either having it with you are having it sent out after a while?
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Old 12-11-14, 05:54 AM
  #30  
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For the hubs and lights, you can get SP hubs for about half the price on SON, yes SON are really nice, and I did about 10,000 km on one, but SP are just as good, and cost a lot less, for the lights, you have chosen a pretty basic model, would use the cash saved with the hub for a better light, preferably with a USB port, so you can charge on the go, AXA, B&M and others make these, and they are becoming more and more common.

For a rear light, would look at a rack mounted dynamo powered one, it's bolted on, and you don't need to carry additional batteries (although a battery backup is always good to have)

For the wheels, any reason for not going disc? Thorn is pretty backward when it comes to disc, but they are the future, and even if you don't want discs now, it may be worth specing the hubs with disc mounts, so they are future proof/have better re-sale value if you ever need to sell them.
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Old 12-11-14, 10:07 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by gregjones View Post
Spend more time in the good ol' South.

We have advanced to wine bottles with twist off caps.
Or you could shave a little more weight by going with wine in a box.
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Old 12-11-14, 10:26 AM
  #32  
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Agree on disc brake hubs, regardless of whether you go disc. I put a disc hub on my front wheel when I built a new wheelset for my non-disc brake bike. Three months later, I crashed (first crash in three years) and bent my fork. Got a new fork with a disc mount and bought a disc brake!

Disc brakes are excellent for several reasons:

1: Stopping power is better.

2: Consistent wet-weather performance.

3: The maintenance, adjustment, and do-it-yourself-ness of disc brakes is, in my experience, exactly the same as rim brakes. I learned how to maintain them in one evening.

4: With rim brakes, you are slowly wearing out your rims until you need a new wheel.
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Old 12-11-14, 03:12 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Agree on disc brake hubs, regardless of whether you go disc. I put a disc hub on my front wheel when I built a new wheelset for my non-disc brake bike. Three months later, I crashed (first crash in three years) and bent my fork. Got a new fork with a disc mount and bought a disc brake!

Disc brakes are excellent for several reasons:

1: Stopping power is better.

2: Consistent wet-weather performance.

3: The maintenance, adjustment, and do-it-yourself-ness of disc brakes is, in my experience, exactly the same as rim brakes. I learned how to maintain them in one evening.

4: With rim brakes, you are slowly wearing out your rims until you need a new wheel.
He could only use disk on the front if he switched to a suspension fork. Thorn solid fork won't take a disk.

The CSS rims he is getting are unlikely to wear out from braking.

If he wanted to put a disk on the back, he could, the frame can take a disk on back.
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Old 12-11-14, 03:39 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by edthesped View Post
Or you could shave a little more weight by going with wine in a box.
Or shave a lot more by leaving the wine out of it.
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Old 12-11-14, 04:10 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by edthesped View Post
Or you could shave a little more weight by going with wine in a box.
Originally Posted by Walter S View Post
Or shave a lot more by leaving the wine out of it.
Blasphemy.

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Old 12-11-14, 04:50 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
He could only use disk on the front if he switched to a suspension fork. Thorn solid fork won't take a disk.
Swap the fork for this Thorn Disc Steel Fork - 109.99 and you have a disc fork with the appropriate touring rack mounts
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Old 12-11-14, 08:53 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by jimc101 View Post
Swap the fork for this Thorn Disc Steel Fork - 109.99 and you have a disc fork with the appropriate touring rack mounts
I do not think that 700c fork is going to work with Nomad geometry but if you wanted to find out you could contact SJS.

I really see no problem with rim brakes on this bike.
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Old 12-13-14, 03:58 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by saddlesores View Post
are you suggesting rear bags + trailer? i went the opposite (when i didn't have 4 bags + trailer). front bags and no rear bags to take some weight off the rear wheel, as you'll still be
adding to the rear load with the trailer.
Actually a pretty good point. Regardless I was more getting meaning you don't really a 4 pannier setup + BOB trailer. Wee bit overkill for luggage for all but the heaviest tourist

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Old 12-14-14, 11:48 PM
  #39  
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Sweet bike / gear by the looks of it you have many of the pieces for a long round-the-world-trip.

-Keep the amount of spokes you have...I would get 10-12 for rear, 2-4 for the front. Did a tour this summer with a 100+ of gear on a trailerless bike. I had 32 spokes as you have, and back spokes breaking were a common thing (i broke about 8 in 4000km). Once one breaks usually all others do too, but if properly de-stressed, re-tensioned, and trued, you can make it work for long distances as needed before ultimately replacing the wheel. They add very little weight but are well worth the piece of mind. Can tape a bunch inside your seat post with duct tape.
-I haven't used a trailer, but I agree not to use one FWIW, spread weight better by putting heavy things in front panniers.
-3 shoes: fine
-Guitar >>>>> Harmonica. Bring it! But get this one... i've played it and it packs great sound for its size http://www.amazon.ca/Martin-String-B.../dp/B000P63U74
-I'd be interested in a half disc / half brake pad system, disc in the rear. Disc for performance, and caliper for the ease of sourcing parts wherever you are around the world. You should always have 50% of your brakes working this way

-Insulated Stainless Steel Thermos is nice instead as a replacement for a waterbottle on the cage. Keeps clean, can hold hot liquids / foods like soups / chili which can be done as takeout.
-Agree with others about the bulky mat. You can lie it out wherever and take a nap / sit down when needed, its great!
-Kindle + iPad = good, not sure how you are transfering photos... Can buy a small SD card reader to transfer photos to your iPad and and easily upload them to sites, great $30 piece of hardware. Depending on the kind
-I found a tarp to be useful, protect your bike and gear from the elements / as well as a noisy & cumbersome theft deterent when wrapped around bike with bungee cords

Last edited by tonytwotimes; 12-15-14 at 12:04 AM.
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