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Wind Pants/ Over Pants?

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Wind Pants/ Over Pants?

Old 12-10-14, 05:13 PM
  #1  
Tandem Tom
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Wind Pants/ Over Pants?

I was wondering if anyone might have a suggestion for the above? My rain pants are very baggy and I was wondering about something a bit less baggy. I would wear these over my tights for colder weather riding.
Thanks!
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Old 12-10-14, 05:22 PM
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I've never felt the need for specific wind pants on tour nor any other time. Rain pants for wind/rain. If it's cold and windy I wear my wool leggings or my fleece-wool pants.
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Old 12-10-14, 08:37 PM
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How cold is "colder weather riding"? Cross-country ski pants work great for temps under 40.
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Old 12-10-14, 08:51 PM
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I must say I love my Mountain Hardwear Serraction pants. The pants are designed for ice climbing which is perfect because the kick patch used for crampons is ideal for protecting against chains and they are designed for a high output activity. That means they have some stretch and are very lightweight and "breathable" (air permeable) so moisture can get out more quickly leaving you less wet on the inside from sweat while keeping dry from rain, snow, and other wet stuff coming from the sky or elsewhere.

They aren't especially baggy, I actually got a pair that is maybe a size big and there is room but I don't feel like I am wearing parachute pants which can happen with some rain pants (as you have described)
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Old 12-10-14, 09:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Tandem Tom View Post
I was wondering if anyone might have a suggestion for the above? My rain pants are very baggy and I was wondering about something a bit less baggy. I would wear these over my tights for colder weather riding.
Thanks!
I picked up a pair of rain pants at MEC a couple years ago which have been amazing.

Up till then, I have really disliked rain pants. They were too baggy, they constricted my knees and put me in all sorts of pain, they caused me to slip and slide on my saddle, they made me sweat, and for whatever reason, I found I had to work harder to cycle when I wore them.

And then, reluctantly, I picked up these particular rain pants. When I tried them on they seemed to have a little bit more potential than others I had tried ... and they were on special ... so I figured I would give them a try. Just recently I wore them on a 100 km audax event in chilly conditions with wave after wave after wave of rain ... and I was comfortable!! Not waterproof ... not waterproof breathable ... not seam sealed ... but they do offer some protection against the rain, they dry quickly when it stops raining, and they offer enough protection against the wind to keep me feeling warm and dry.

Unfortunately I don't know whether MEC still sells the exact ones I have ... isn't that always the way. You find something great ... and they stop making it. But they are something like these:

Pearl Izumi Select Thermal Barrier Pants (Women's) - Mountain Equipment Co-op. Free Shipping Available

Or these:

Pearl Izumi Elite AmFIB Tights (Men's) - Mountain Equipment Co-op. Free Shipping Available
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Old 12-10-14, 09:09 PM
  #6  
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^+1 on the PI tights. The Thermal Barrier are, for me, good in rain down to about 40, and in the dry down to low 30s. The AmFIB down to whatever and raining, and who knows in the dry, but definitely below freezing. Overpants, like one would wear for hiking, are simply awful IMO for the reasons Machka gives.

The less expensive Performance T.r.i.f.l.e.x tights (silly censor) are also very good below 45, but much too warm above that.

Edit: I forgot I was on the Touring forum! If you're touring in 40 and raining, you are just nuts. Stay home. If you are winter expedition touring on snow and ice with studs, the Performance or AmFIB would probably work. In Fairbanks, I refused to put long johns on my legs until it was 11 below. Toughness counts. In ordinary summer touring conditions, ordinary shorts and leg warmers (I like Voler) work fine down to about 45 and raining. I've worn that combo down to 33 and sleeting on a 200k brevet, but I wasn't happy. I was however very gratified to discover that having my feet totally numb for several hours did not do any permanent damage since it was above freezing the whole time.

Last edited by Carbonfiberboy; 12-10-14 at 09:19 PM.
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Old 12-11-14, 05:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
The less expensive Performance T.r.i.f.l.e.x tights (silly censor) are also very good below 45, but much too warm above that.
Those work very well for me around home, but are kind of heavy and bulky to pack for a tour where I might wear them only once in a while. So I usually take some kind of wind pants to wear over thinner, lighter, less bulky tights. I have some that weigh 3 ounces so even with thinner tights they are a lot lighter than the t*****x. The wind pants have the advantage of being nicer for staying warm and dry around camp IMO.

Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Edit: I forgot I was on the Touring forum! If you're touring in 40 and raining, you are just nuts. Stay home.
The thing is that especially in the mountains and on long tours you really have no idea what the weather might do. In the Rockies it can snow in July or August. Besides I'd rather ride in 40 F and rain that 110 F (or even 100 F for that matter), but on some tours you may need to deal with both.
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Old 12-11-14, 08:12 AM
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when I went looking for new rain pants a few years ago, I looked at and tried on a whole bunch of them. As you say, many of them are just so bloody baggy, with me this was often shown up more as I am slight. Some also are made of really heavy material, so both heavy in weight as well as being more stiff than I'd like , especially when thinking of using them in warm temps.
The North Face ones I finally ended up getting are a material that is a lot lighter than some, and the cut was much narrower than some also, plus they have zips at bottom of legs along with velcro closures so you put them on with your shoes on and then tighten them up so they arent so baggy around the chainrings--a real plus in my opinion.

as these are so lightweight and not bulky, they can easily be used as a last resort wind pant, although if not raining, I do prefer to use various tights and or tighter x-c pants I have, just to have less flapping if I want to ride fast. But as a pair of overpants they can work well and work really well as rain pants.

As you are asking specifically about less baggy overpants, I have had a pair (top and bottom) of somewhat pricey XC pants and top made by Sporthill, XC pants.

Sporthill XC Pants: Pants | Free Shipping at L.L.Bean

$100 is expensive, but I have used these for commuting in cooler weather (10c and below, low 50s f) and they block the wind yet breath well like no other tights I have ever used. I have been using these biking for probably ten years and in the long run, they have lasted very well wear wise, and for the amount I use them in spring and fall, were completely worth it as it is truly amazing how well they work. When it is colder, closer to freezing, I put a thin pair of tights underneath for extra warmth, so they are rather versatile.

As I start riding as soon as the snow salt and ice is gone, and ride until the salt and ice returns, they get a lot of use.

as someone else mentioned, wool leg warmers are great, the wool/synthetic mixes are comfortable, with stretch to fit well, and do a great job when damp for keeping warm, better than regular tights in that regard.
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Old 12-11-14, 10:59 AM
  #9  
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There Have been and likely are High thread-count Woven Nylon Fabric Wind front , and fleece or spandex backed Tights .


You can take a baggy what you have in to a Tailor and have it Pegged , or just get a Pattern and the Material and have it sewn for You & the Ms.
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Old 12-11-14, 12:01 PM
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I have the perfect suggestion!

Body Wrappers, a dance company, makes a pair of 4oz Ripstop Nylon pants. They're perfect wind pants. Stretchy waist, stretchy cuffs, and a "slim" fit typical of dancing clothes, but not tight at all. Great for pedaling in, great for repelling a little bit of weather and keeping warm.

Best part? They cost $18. "Ultralight" wind pants from Patagonia that weigh the same cost five times as much.

Body Wrappers: Ripstop Pant
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Old 12-11-14, 02:28 PM
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
I have the perfect suggestion!

Body Wrappers, a dance company, makes a pair of 4oz Ripstop Nylon pants. They're perfect wind pants. Stretchy waist, stretchy cuffs, and a "slim" fit typical of dancing clothes, but not tight at all. Great for pedaling in, great for repelling a little bit of weather and keeping warm.

Best part? They cost $18. "Ultralight" wind pants from Patagonia that weigh the same cost five times as much.

Body Wrappers: Ripstop Pant
I have those too and they have worked out well for me. They are light and inexpensive. Mine were not waterproof at all, but I treated them with a DWR treatment and now they are at least fairly water resistant. I definitely like mine.
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Old 12-11-14, 02:40 PM
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Cheap nylon wind pants are useful piece of gear but not easy to find. The tip in posts 10 and 11 is very useful.
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Old 12-11-14, 02:40 PM
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Wind Pants/ Over Pants?

For commuting in the winter here, down to -10C, that's what I wear, wind pants over running tights.
I don't tour in sub zero conditions, so tights for colder mornings and rain pants are enough.
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Old 12-11-14, 05:05 PM
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I'd forgotten about O2 rain wear. This stuff was mildly popular around here a few years ago. Their 3 oz. pant:
Original Pant | O2 Rainwear

Only thing is, and which should be obvious, is that at 3 oz. for a pair of pants, the material is not particularly durable. However for a one-time descent from a pass in the sleet, they would be invaluable. Something to think about taking for emergency only or as has been suggested, to wear around camp. They make a whole line of rain wear of differing weights.
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Old 12-11-14, 06:59 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
As you are asking specifically about less baggy overpants, I have had a pair (top and bottom) of somewhat pricey XC pants and top made by Sporthill, XC pants.

Sporthill XC Pants: Pants | Free Shipping at L.L.Bean

$100 is expensive, but I have used these for commuting in cooler weather (10c and below, low 50s f) and they block the wind yet breath well like no other tights I have ever used. I have been using these biking for probably ten years and in the long run, they have lasted very well wear wise, and for the amount I use them in spring and fall, were completely worth it as it is truly amazing how well they work. When it is colder, closer to freezing, I put a thin pair of tights underneath for extra warmth, so they are rather versatile.


.
+1
My wife and I also use Sporthill XC pants for cycling and skiing. Heck, my wife wears one version or another as casual wear during the winter. Any of their "Zone 3 pants or tops are wind proof to about 40 mph, and are warm and breathe well. Being we live about 40 miles from their shop, we make it a point to go to their annual clearance sale. Consequently we each have several Sporthill Garments. Make sure they are Zone 3 fabric.

djb pretty much summed up their good points; can't think of any bad ones.

PS. I wore mine on a ride today.
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Old 12-13-14, 08:49 AM
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Machka: I have a feeling we are both wearing the same pair of MEC rain pants. I bought a pair at random off of MEC last year and they have been absolutely amazing. Not baggy at all, doesn't flap in the wind, breathe better than most pants and after 8 months of wearing them this year, they look like new still. I think they were about $100 CAN last year regular price.
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Old 12-13-14, 10:59 PM
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I commute almost daily here in Kansas. The temps are in the low 30's I bought a pair of Specialized Wind Blocker pants and I love them, I've ridden in 22 degree weather and I stay warm. My commute is 8.5 miles takes about 32 minutes.
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Old 12-13-14, 11:24 PM
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Funny, seems lots of people in this thread are willing to shell out top dollar for "technical" clothing when the aforementioned cheap pair used by staehpj1 and I performs admirably.

If we were talking about hiking pants, or cycling shoes, or tires, buying high-quality stuff seems to be a better value in the long term.

With a pair of wind pants that you'll pull out of your pack once every few rides, and only during colder temperatures, it seems $18 is the better value. Especially considering they're just as durable as the $100+ Patagonia or Marmot or MEC or Arcteryx alternatives that weigh the same (or more!) with a fancy logo near the knee.

The best thing Bike Touring taught me in terms of gear is when to buy cheap, and when to invest. These, I buy cheap.
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Old 12-13-14, 11:30 PM
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^We ended up in the rain for probably 12+ days on my last tour. I was glad I spent the money on nice pants. My friend did not, and he wasn't so happy riding in the rain all day over and over again.

A bit pricey, but I have a pair of Cannondale rain pants that I've been very happy with. The only part I find getting wet is the crotch, and it's just slightly damp. For some reason I can't comprehend, they felt the need to put a random stitching there to give the look of having a zippered fly, even though they're just an elastic band pant with no opening in the front. So basically they took some pretty sweet pants and stitched holes in them for looks that make them not completely waterproof... But like I said, it just allows enough moisture to get you slightly damp, and that dries right away. I still really like the pants. They also have a zipper up the outside of the leg that works well for venting when the rain stops for a little bit but you're not quite certain enough to stop and ditch them.

Last edited by 3speed; 12-15-14 at 09:56 PM.
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Old 12-14-14, 06:09 AM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Funny, seems lots of people in this thread are willing to shell out top dollar for "technical" clothing when the aforementioned cheap pair used by staehpj1 and I performs admirably.

If we were talking about hiking pants, or cycling shoes, or tires, buying high-quality stuff seems to be a better value in the long term.

With a pair of wind pants that you'll pull out of your pack once every few rides, and only during colder temperatures, it seems $18 is the better value. Especially considering they're just as durable as the $100+ Patagonia or Marmot or MEC or Arcteryx alternatives that weigh the same (or more!) with a fancy logo near the knee.

The best thing Bike Touring taught me in terms of gear is when to buy cheap, and when to invest. These, I buy cheap.
That is a good point with very general application. I mostly agree and it sounds like my experience parallels yours for the most part, but it does depend on the individual usage of the particular item to some extent. For example someone else might wear their wind pants constantly rather than just once in a while or subject them to much harder wear.

It does make sense to spend the money where it makes a real difference and be frugal where good enough is good enough. Then there are cases where a cheap item is actually better, which I find to be the case fairly often.

I too spend more on bike shoes, tires, and some other items, but I wear cheap hiking pants when backpacking that I like very well (world wide sportsman poly zip off leg pants at about $25). I splurge on my sleeping bag and pad, but use cheaper items in a lot of other cases. I wind up with gear that works very well for me while spending way less overall than the majority of bike tourists.

Another reason why cheaper can be better is that you don't get as locked into a decision. If you spend for top of the line racks and panniers and after a trip or two realize that you want to go much lighter it is harder to bite the bullet and stop using $500-1000 worth of stuff. If you bought an on sale set of racks and panniers from Nashbar for $100-200 it is way less painful to shelve it when/if you decide you want to try a more minimal packing approach. I know that I have probably been through 5 or 6 packing styles ranging from 45 pounds of gear down to 9 pounds of gear. The very inexpensive panniers have a lot of mileage on them and are still fine, but get used seldom if at all these days. They served me well and I am glad I didn't spring for top of the line stuff there.

On the other had some of my much more expensive items are a joy to use and worth every penny.

So yeah, use your head and spend the money where it makes the most sense, but go cheaper where that makes sense.

Sometimes you get what you pay for and sometimes you don't
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Old 12-14-14, 06:29 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by SparkyGA View Post
Machka: I have a feeling we are both wearing the same pair of MEC rain pants.
Dude, don't you know she's married?!
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Old 12-15-14, 12:23 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
Funny, seems lots of people in this thread are willing to shell out top dollar for "technical" clothing when the aforementioned cheap pair used by staehpj1 and I performs admirably.

If we were talking about hiking pants, or cycling shoes, or tires, buying high-quality stuff seems to be a better value in the long term.

With a pair of wind pants that you'll pull out of your pack once every few rides, and only during colder temperatures, it seems $18 is the better value. Especially considering they're just as durable as the $100+ Patagonia or Marmot or MEC or Arcteryx alternatives that weigh the same (or more!) with a fancy logo near the knee.

The best thing Bike Touring taught me in terms of gear is when to buy cheap, and when to invest. These, I buy cheap.
I suspect the way you use your equipment, your choices work well for you.

Almost all my gear serves multiple activities: bike touring, mountaineering, ski touring, ski patrol, and backpacking. Sometimes my well being is dependent on the reliability of my gear. I usually buy the best gear I can afford; however, it is not necessarily the most expensive.

I don't carry dedicated "wind pants" on tour. I'll carry my rain pants and a pair of tights (weight depends on season). If it is cold and windy, I'll put on the tights. If it is wet, I'll put on the rain pants. If it is cold and wet, I'll wear both.

With the Zone 3 Sporthill XC pants used as tights, warmth and wind protection up to 40 mph are provided. They are made from a wind proof fleece-like fabric. About 90% of the people in our ski patrol use these pants because of their utility and durability. I believe that this is one of the times you get what you pay for.

I just used this photo on another thread, and realized that that I was wearing my Sporthill XC pants. I also wore them for a ride today and the temperature was almost 50F. They are comfortable at a fairly wide range of temps.

Last edited by Doug64; 12-16-14 at 05:27 PM.
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Old 12-16-14, 01:10 PM
  #23  
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I looked more closely at the Body Wrappers pants. They seem to only be available in women's sizes and the largest is still too small. Rats!
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Old 12-16-14, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Tandem Tom View Post
I was wondering if anyone might have a suggestion for the above? My rain pants are very baggy and I was wondering about something a bit less baggy. I would wear these over my tights for colder weather riding.
Thanks!
I got these last winter (Polar Vortex winter) and was very happy. I've been comfortable with them down to 0F on rides about a hour long. I wear Chrome knickers over the top and normal padded biking short under them, plus I have thick knee high Smart Wool socks.

* normal disclaimer for all these winter bike posts: my comfort in cold weather is a little freakish. Therefore, a *normal* person would likely find this comfortable down to 15F.

Somebody recommended O2, I love them, but they are baggie. I save the O2 pants for cold rain or below zero over the PI tights.
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