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Miyata Eiger

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Old 01-02-15, 08:14 AM
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WGD
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Miyata Eiger

Having just joined this forum, I was browsing the archives and came across a post which pointed out that Miyata still produces bikes for the Japanese domestic market. So I fired up an online translator and brought up their site. They have a particular bike (The Eiger) in their lineup that looks very similar to the classic 1000s, though a bit smaller (47cm and 52cm frames only, 26-in wheels). It's even equipped with non-aero brake levers and down-tube shifters. The price listed on the website is roughly US $1,000 at the current exchange rate. I realize the difficulty of acquiring one would be substantial, but has anyone actually seen one of these?
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Old 01-02-15, 10:56 AM
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I read about this bike a year or so ago- it has 650a wheels, which like you mention, is 26"(pretty sure?...those 650 options mix me up).
Anyways, its a great looking bike, albeit incredibly limited in size.

My love for Miyata and touring would put this bike right in my crosshairs for figuring out how to get one stateside...if it came in 64cm. I wonder why the size selection is so limited. Yes I get that 64cm is on the larger end, but I wouldn't think 47cm is all that popular a size either, but I guess they know their domestic market best. You would still think that something like a 54 or 56cm would be a popular size.

Sharp looking bike, for sure.
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Old 01-02-15, 05:28 PM
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^ The Japanese are shorter than us. I bet 64cm are pretty popular in certain parts of Africa.
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Old 01-02-15, 05:56 PM
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A new production Japanese bicycle with 650A wheels Funny that Panaracer Col de la Vie's happen to come in that size They must have decided to split the difference between 26" 559 mountain bike and 29" 700c 622 wheels. Let's do the math 559+622= 1181 / 2 = 590.5
Odd that someone else did the math for an in between size and came up with 584 (650B)

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Old 01-02-15, 08:38 PM
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I think 650A is the old British three speed tires, such as the Raleigh. If so, that would not be a good tire for touring, as I have no clue where you could buy a tire. I bought some 650B tires back in the 1980s and I think they sold me 650A instead, they blew off the rims when I pumped them up and blew out the tubes in a rather noisy fashion. The world of 26 inch tires can get confusing.
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Old 01-03-15, 12:24 AM
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A couple of publicity images:



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Old 01-03-15, 06:08 PM
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For sure, they are going to stick to what can sell in their market...but not even a 54cm is offered? That would be a prety popular size, I'd think.

Looks like I am not an expert of the Japanese bike market!
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Old 01-03-15, 07:27 PM
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No value to this post except to say that is a very pretty bike. I love the scale and proportions of it. It's not for me but very nice looking (with the hammered fenders especially)
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Old 01-03-15, 09:06 PM
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Quill stem, non areo levers, downtube shifters, pump pegs on the seat stay, hammered fenders, lugs! Everything that I love in a bike. Kind of glad its not available in a 59-62cm size range, as then I would be really sad its not available here.

I own a later 80s miyata 1000 frame in a 54, and toured on it once, it is a fantastic riding bike, but found a larger tourer that fit.
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Old 01-03-15, 09:57 PM
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WGD, It's possible, though I haven't checked, that the frame set in larger sizes are offered in N. America under a different name. Check some of the boutique labels.

Brad
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Old 01-06-15, 07:46 PM
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I still occasionally ride the Miyata 1000 I bought new in 1985. After 30 years, it's a pleasure to ride; but everything considered, I prefer my "modern" touring bike that has brifters, is easier to adjust, and weights several pounds less than the Miyata.
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Old 01-07-15, 09:17 AM
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Very nice. If Miyata sold those in the US in larger sizes, I definitely would be interested.

BTW, Mercian and Bob Jackson in England sell similar touring frames made of Reynolds 631 steel. You can order them "off the peg" for reasonable prices or custom for higher prices. Even the non-custom frames can be painted in virtually any color. I bought a BJ World Tour about 5 years ago for about $600 and I don't think prices are much different now, particularly with the dollar increasing so much in value over the past year.
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Old 01-07-15, 10:34 AM
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Ah, 650B.. the Japanese have long loved classic French touring bike designs..

I note the Dunlop/Woods valve tubes too ..
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Old 01-08-15, 06:55 PM
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Someone should sanction this thread.
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Old 12-28-16, 06:43 AM
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Funny, I just came across a new Miyata Eiger here in Japan with a 55cm frame, so apparently 47cm and 52cm frames are not the only option. I am considering buying it, as it is an unsold model from last year, and the price is cheap. A funny thing about bike shops in Japan is that they sometimes have new bikes dating to the 60's and 70's, still unassembled in their original boxes.
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Old 01-01-17, 10:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Sangetsu View Post
Funny, I just came across a new Miyata Eiger here in Japan with a 55cm frame, so apparently 47cm and 52cm frames are not the only option. I am considering buying it, as it is an unsold model from last year, and the price is cheap. A funny thing about bike shops in Japan is that they sometimes have new bikes dating to the 60's and 70's, still unassembled in their original boxes.
That sounds awesome. I would love to go to these shops and buy NOS bikes in their boxes but the sad thing is I would want to build them up and ride them and wouldn't want to keep cardboard around.
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