Go Back  Bike Forums > The Racer's Forum > Track Cycling: Velodrome Racing and Training Area
Reload this Page >

Ask your small, random, track-related questions here

Notices
Track Cycling: Velodrome Racing and Training Area Looking to enter into the realm of track racing? Want to share your experiences and tactics for riding on a velodrome? The Track Cycling forums is for you! Come in and discuss training/racing, equipment, and current track cycling events.

Ask your small, random, track-related questions here

Old 10-12-15, 03:15 PM
  #2651  
Lapped 3x
 
taras0000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: 43.2330941,-79.8022037,17
Posts: 1,723
Liked 23 Times in 20 Posts
Banchad, what sort of bars are you running now?
taras0000 is offline  
Old 10-12-15, 03:18 PM
  #2652  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 152

Bikes: Planet X Pro Carbon, Dolan FXE, Fuji Transonic

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by taras0000
Banchad, what sort of bars are you running now?
Some ****e aluminium bars from Evans Cycles

These: FWE 31.8mm Track Bars | Evans Cycles
Banchad is offline  
Old 10-12-15, 03:50 PM
  #2653  
Full Member
 
sgtdirt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Mentor, Ohio
Posts: 262

Bikes: KHS Grit 400, Redline Conquest SS, Redline MonoCog SS,2014 Felt TK3,

Liked 22 Times in 9 Posts
how's my posture?

after my cyclocross races, i did a workout on the track (the track was on the same premises as the CX race). pedaling up to speed was the easy part. tired race legs makes stopping a little interesting!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
track.jpg (97.2 KB, 176 views)
File Type: jpg
tack2.jpg (98.6 KB, 165 views)
sgtdirt is offline  
Old 10-12-15, 07:10 PM
  #2654  
Elitist
Thread Starter
 
carleton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 15,965
Liked 93 Times in 78 Posts
Originally Posted by sgtdirt
how's my posture?

after my cyclocross races, i did a workout on the track (the track was on the same premises as the CX race). pedaling up to speed was the easy part. tired race legs makes stopping a little interesting!
Looks good.

BTW, just coast down to stop. Even if that means taking an extra lap inside of the blue ribbon at at casual pace.
carleton is offline  
Old 10-12-15, 08:34 PM
  #2655  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Ontario
Posts: 740

Bikes: T1, S2, P3

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Short tracks can be funny since the minimum speed to stay upright on the track can be a fair bit higher than the max speed to stay in control on the apron due to how steep the banks are, coupled with a very short straight/stopping distance, you tend to have to 'brake' more than you would on a longer track that you can coast down on.


Looks like an awesome day there, this must be the some of the last riding. I think detroit is all put away already.
gtrob is offline  
Old 10-12-15, 11:11 PM
  #2656  
Lapped 3x
 
taras0000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: 43.2330941,-79.8022037,17
Posts: 1,723
Liked 23 Times in 20 Posts
Banchad, you should be fine with just about any Cro-Mo bars. I used to run steel Nittos on all my bikes, road included. I found that without the stiffness that is engineered into track bikes, the steel bars were fine, YMMV. I'm a larger guy, so steel bars don't rattle me as much as someone smaller.
taras0000 is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 03:26 PM
  #2657  
Full Member
 
sgtdirt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Mentor, Ohio
Posts: 262

Bikes: KHS Grit 400, Redline Conquest SS, Redline MonoCog SS,2014 Felt TK3,

Liked 22 Times in 9 Posts
it turned out to be a beautiful day. the guy who owns the track set up a food tent for the CX race. he had homemade smoked pulled pork and brisket...mmmm...gooood! beer too!

he'll keep the track open for night riding (5pm to...) until the snow falls which around here, could be tomorrow.
sgtdirt is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 07:26 PM
  #2658  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Delaware, USA
Posts: 607

Bikes: Serotta steel track bike, Specialized MTB

Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by carleton
+1

The steel are so stiff that they are uncomfortable on a bumpy track.

Unless you are stronger than average, Nitto B125AA are fine. Just get some narrow ones. Also, the B125AA are just about as light as the Scattos.

But, weight really shouldn't matter.

If you have the extra funds, go for B125AA. If you are on a budget, get B123 (narrow for both). Scattos aren't worth the $$ for new racers unless you've bought everything else (skinsuits, track annual pass, aero helmet, aero front wheel, etc...)
Thanks for your advice
Right now, I have a nitto steel B123(40cm)
I was asking this question, because i'm planning to get a track bike fit from "Bike line".
However, I'm not this will help a lot......
Do you think I should get a 38cm handlebar?
Sorry about asking you about bike fit again...
gycho77 is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 07:37 PM
  #2659  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Kanazawa
Posts: 1,700

Bikes: Marin Stelvio, Pogliaghi SL, Panasonic NJS, Dolan DF4, Intense Pro24 BMX

Liked 87 Times in 58 Posts
Originally Posted by gycho77
Thanks for your advice
Right now, I have a nitto steel B123(40cm)
I was asking this question, because i'm planning to get a track bike fit from "Bike line".
However, I'm not this will help a lot......
Do you think I should get a 38cm handlebar?
Sorry about asking you about bike fit again...
I started several years ago now on 40cm. I'm now on 36cm and pretty happy with that. Several guys at my track are using the little 33cm bars and really liking those. Seems like narrower feels weird at first, then you get used to it and like it. Of course this is for sprinters. If you're a sprinter and you're not a really huge guy, I'd consider trying out something under 38cm. If you're an enduro, then someone else here can advise, but 40 is still reasonable because that set-up is closer to a road position generally.
Baby Puke is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 07:45 PM
  #2660  
Elitist
Thread Starter
 
carleton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 15,965
Liked 93 Times in 78 Posts
Originally Posted by Baby Puke
I started several years ago now on 40cm. I'm now on 36cm and pretty happy with that. Several guys at my track are using the little 33cm bars and really liking those. Seems like narrower feels weird at first, then you get used to it and like it. Of course this is for sprinters. If you're a sprinter and you're not a really huge guy, I'd consider trying out something under 38cm. If you're an enduro, then someone else here can advise, but 40 is still reasonable because that set-up is closer to a road position generally.
+1

Originally Posted by gycho77
Thanks for your advice
Right now, I have a nitto steel B123(40cm)
I was asking this question, because i'm planning to get a track bike fit from "Bike line".
However, I'm not this will help a lot......
Do you think I should get a 38cm handlebar?
Sorry about asking you about bike fit again...
No worries.

A lot of people a little reluctant to get bars under 40cm at first. But, these days, even 38cm Easton EC90s are considered "wide". As BabyPuke suggests, if you are focusing on sprinting, go with something under 38cm.

To put this into perspective, I'm 6'1" with broad shoulders. All of my tshirts are XL or XXL and I ride 37cm Scattos and I have some 33cm Nitto B123s as well. My 38cm Easton EC90s (GREAT bars, BTW) feel super wide.

Take the leap of faith and get narrow bars. You won't regret it.

And, also as BabyPuke suggests: If you are focusing on enduro events (mass start, madison etc...) then go for 40cm. You can find road bars in 40cm. I know Fizik has made some for years (for jr riders) and I'm sure others do, too.
carleton is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 07:52 PM
  #2661  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Delaware, USA
Posts: 607

Bikes: Serotta steel track bike, Specialized MTB

Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Baby Puke
I started several years ago now on 40cm. I'm now on 36cm and pretty happy with that. Several guys at my track are using the little 33cm bars and really liking those. Seems like narrower feels weird at first, then you get used to it and like it. Of course this is for sprinters. If you're a sprinter and you're not a really huge guy, I'd consider trying out something under 38cm. If you're an enduro, then someone else here can advise, but 40 is still reasonable because that set-up is closer to a road position generally.
I'm really interested in sprint races, but I cannot attend sprint races because of my uci group?
I currently riding track bike(with brake adapter) on the quiet road.
Thank you so much for your help
gycho77 is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 07:56 PM
  #2662  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Delaware, USA
Posts: 607

Bikes: Serotta steel track bike, Specialized MTB

Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by carleton
+1



No worries.

A lot of people a little reluctant to get bars under 40cm at first. But, these days, even 38cm Easton EC90s are considered "wide". As BabyPuke suggests, if you are focusing on sprinting, go with something under 38cm.

To put this into perspective, I'm 6'1" with broad shoulders. All of my tshirts are XL or XXL and I ride 37cm Scattos and I have some 33cm Nitto B123s as well. My 38cm Easton EC90s (GREAT bars, BTW) feel super wide.

Take the leap of faith and get narrow bars. You won't regret it.

And, also as BabyPuke suggests: If you are focusing on enduro events (mass start, madison etc...) then go for 40cm. You can find road bars in 40cm. I know Fizik has made some for years (for jr riders) and I'm sure others do, too.
I cannot attend sprint races yet.
However, I should try get a narrow handlebar for the future

I'm sorry but can you give me some advices for getting track fit with a local bike shop?
I don't live near velodrome. So I'm guessing the shop does not have any experience with track fit.

Thank you for helping me
gycho77 is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 08:00 PM
  #2663  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Kanazawa
Posts: 1,700

Bikes: Marin Stelvio, Pogliaghi SL, Panasonic NJS, Dolan DF4, Intense Pro24 BMX

Liked 87 Times in 58 Posts
Originally Posted by gycho77
I'm really interested in sprint races, but I cannot attend sprint races because of my uci group?
I currently riding track bike(with brake adapter) on the quiet road.
Thank you so much for your help
This seems strange. Where are you? Can you describe your riding situation a bit more? When I moved to Japan, I was initially frozen out of riding the track because of the pro keirin situation. But through patience and persistence I eventually met "the right people" and was able to get on the track regularly (though still not as often as I'd have liked). Tell us more about your situation.
Baby Puke is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 08:17 PM
  #2664  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Delaware, USA
Posts: 607

Bikes: Serotta steel track bike, Specialized MTB

Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Baby Puke
This seems strange. Where are you? Can you describe your riding situation a bit more? When I moved to Japan, I was initially frozen out of riding the track because of the pro keirin situation. But through patience and persistence I eventually met "the right people" and was able to get on the track regularly (though still not as often as I'd have liked). Tell us more about your situation.
So I live in Delaware which is 2 hours away from the velodrome(Valley proffered velodrome).
Therefore, I train on the quiet road with the track bike(with brake). I used to ride my road bike, but I sold the road bike......
I have a mtb(for bad weather) and a track bike.
Also to race keirin and sprint races, I need to be a professional rider(cat 2?).
I can do Omnium and scratch races.

Right now, I have a 40cm nitto handlebar with steel bike(eBay)
My neighbor(retired track cyclist) gave me the handlebar
Because of my neighbor, I just need a good bike fit.
My back hurts when I'm sprinting.
This is why I'm asking many questions about bike fit.

Thank you so much for your help, and sorry about bad english
gycho77 is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 08:31 PM
  #2665  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Kanazawa
Posts: 1,700

Bikes: Marin Stelvio, Pogliaghi SL, Panasonic NJS, Dolan DF4, Intense Pro24 BMX

Liked 87 Times in 58 Posts
If you're in the US you should be able to race any type of race you want as a Cat 5. It's true that you won't be eligible to race in the national championships in sprint races until you upgrade. It's down to what races the local promoter puts on, but I'd think at least some sprint events happen for lower category races at Trexlertown. Somebody who's local there and chime in and help.

As far as the distance form the track, that's tough. Training on the road may be your only option.
Baby Puke is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 08:38 PM
  #2666  
Elitist
Thread Starter
 
carleton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 15,965
Liked 93 Times in 78 Posts
Originally Posted by gycho77
So I live in Delaware which is 2 hours away from the velodrome(Valley proffered velodrome).
Therefore, I train on the quiet road with the track bike(with brake). I used to ride my road bike, but I sold the road bike......
I have a mtb(for bad weather) and a track bike.
Also to race keirin and sprint races, I need to be a professional rider(cat 2?).
I can do Omnium and scratch races.

Right now, I have a 40cm nitto handlebar with steel bike(eBay)
My neighbor(retired track cyclist) gave me the handlebar
Because of my neighbor, I just need a good bike fit.
My back hurts when I'm sprinting.
This is why I'm asking many questions about bike fit.

Thank you so much for your help, and sorry about bad english
I think you are a bit confused about "sprinting".

When we say "Sprinter" or "Enduro" or "Endurance" we are simply talking about they style of racing you would like to do. If we were talking about Baseball, we'd say "Pitcher", "Catcher", "Outfielder", etc...

We assumed that you have already decided on which discipline to focus on.

Cycling is divided into experience+ability levels. Beginners race beginners, intermediate race other intermediate, super-fast race other super-fast racers. That way it keeps it fun for everyone.

You can still do "sprint" events in the beginner group. You don't have to wait till you become pro to do sprints, just like little Timmy doesn't have to go to the Dogers before he can ever Pitch

Find out if your track offers beginner races. That's where you belong. You don't need a UCI category. UCI is for international racing.
carleton is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 08:42 PM
  #2667  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Delaware, USA
Posts: 607

Bikes: Serotta steel track bike, Specialized MTB

Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by carleton
I think you are a bit confused about "sprinting".

When we say "Sprinter" or "Enduro" or "Endurance" we are simply talking about they style of racing you would like to do. If we were talking about Baseball, we'd say "Pitcher", "Catcher", "Outfielder", etc...

We assumed that you have already decided on which discipline to focus on.

Cycling is divided into experience+ability levels. Beginners race beginners, intermediate race other intermediate, super-fast race other super-fast racers. That way it keeps it fun for everyone.

You can still do "sprint" events in the beginner group. You don't have to wait till you become pro to do sprints, just like little Timmy doesn't have to go to the Dogers before he can ever Pitch

Find out if your track offers beginner races. That's where you belong. You don't need a UCI category. UCI is for international racing.
Oh sorry I made a mistake sprinting should be dancing.
I was confused with korean haha

I should do some more research about the race

thanks
gycho77 is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 08:48 PM
  #2668  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Delaware, USA
Posts: 607

Bikes: Serotta steel track bike, Specialized MTB

Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Baby Puke
If you're in the US you should be able to race any type of race you want as a Cat 5. It's true that you won't be eligible to race in the national championships in sprint races until you upgrade. It's down to what races the local promoter puts on, but I'd think at least some sprint events happen for lower category races at Trexlertown. Somebody who's local there and chime in and help.

As far as the distance form the track, that's tough. Training on the road may be your only option.
Thank you for your help!!
I'm having hard time finding informations about the races.
Maybe I should go to the velodrome often for help
gycho77 is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 08:51 PM
  #2669  
Elitist
Thread Starter
 
carleton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 15,965
Liked 93 Times in 78 Posts
Think of racing categories like military rank. You have to be promoted by someone with authority to promote you. There are 2 major systems in the USA:

- USA Cycling
- ATRA (American Track Racing Association


USA Cycling Categories (low to high):

- Category 5 (new beginner...just paid my fee and I know nothing)
- Category 4 (getting better. more experience)
- Category 3 (pretty good. experience plus fast)
- Category 2 (very good. experience plus very fast)
- Category 1 (fast as pro, but do not have a pro contract)
- Pro (have a pro contract with strict rules. These are the guys you see on TV and in magazines.)


ATRA (low to high):

- Category D (new beginner)
- Category C (some experience)
- Category B (some experience plus fast)
- Category A (experienced plus very fast. Similar to Pro/1/2 in USA Cycling)

When you race, you will race with other athletes in your skill level. Category 5 will race with other Category 5s. Pro will race with other Pros.

That is the general rule. The problem is that very often there are not enough Pros to make a good race, so they let Category 1 people race. This makes it a Pro/1 race. Again, sometimes there are not enough Pro/1 people there to make a big field...so they will allow 2s in as well. This makes it a Pro/1/2 race. NOW you have a full track Of course, the 2s will sometimes be too slow to keep up.

Same system for ATRA. Look at Dick Lane Velodrome results here: Results : Dick Lane Velodrome - Fixed Gear Bicycle Racing (East Point) Atlanta, GA

Notice how here, there were enough racers to make individual A, B, and C groups:


But, this day had a low attendance. So, the skill groups were combined:


On a day like the above, there may be only 5 or 6 Category A racers. That's not fun. So, they let the Category B racers join in.

Also, if you note above, Daniel Holt is a pro. He's the only pro there. If they had him race the Pro category alone...that would be very boring
carleton is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 08:58 PM
  #2670  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Delaware, USA
Posts: 607

Bikes: Serotta steel track bike, Specialized MTB

Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by carleton
USA Cycling Categories (low to high):

- Category 5 (new beginner...just paid my fee and I know nothing)
- Category 4 (getting better. more experience)
- Category 3 (pretty good. experience plus fast)
- Category 2 (very good. experience plus very fast)
- Category 1 (fast as pro, but do not have a pro contract)
- Pro (have a pro contract with strict rules. These are the guys you see on TV and in magazines.)
haha nice explanation

thank you for your explanation, this information helped me a lot
gycho77 is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 09:06 PM
  #2671  
Elitist
Thread Starter
 
carleton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 15,965
Liked 93 Times in 78 Posts
Originally Posted by gycho77
Right now, I have a 40cm nitto handlebar with steel bike(eBay)
My neighbor(retired track cyclist) gave me the handlebar
Because of my neighbor, I just need a good bike fit.
My back hurts when I'm sprinting.
This is why I'm asking many questions about bike fit.

Thank you so much for your help, and sorry about bad english
Your bars are fine for now. Only upgrade when you have extra money or just want to. You don't *need* to do this.

Aggressive track positions will hurt your back. Save this for actual racing Raise your bars up!

But, understand that you don't need to train 100% on your track bike to be ready for next season.

Remember, Daniel-son did not train to kick and punch by kicking and punching.

carleton is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 09:09 PM
  #2672  
Elitist
Thread Starter
 
carleton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 15,965
Liked 93 Times in 78 Posts
The lessons that preceded:

carleton is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 09:10 PM
  #2673  
Elitist
Thread Starter
 
carleton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 15,965
Liked 93 Times in 78 Posts
3 and 4


I'm an 80s kid
carleton is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 09:33 PM
  #2674  
Full Member
 
dunderhi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: 130 miles from Ttown
Posts: 436

Bikes: Little Wing, XTRACK, Electron Pro, SuperCorsa, Paramount, & Thunderdrome

Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Baby Puke
If you're in the US you should be able to race any type of race you want as a Cat 5. It's true that you won't be eligible to race in the national championships in sprint races until you upgrade. It's down to what races the local promoter puts on, but I'd think at least some sprint events happen for lower category races at Trexlertown. Somebody who's local there and chime in and help.

As far as the distance form the track, that's tough. Training on the road may be your only option.
Sprints and timed events are a rare sight at Ttown. There's only a couple of opportunities to do a sprint or a pursuit each year. The sprinter vs. enduro terminology isn't used much there because almost everyone is an enduro, so we just call ourselves track racers. At Ttown there are plenty of mass start opportunities for riders of all ages and capabilities. If you are new to track racing (Cat4/5) or a over 35 (Cat1/2/3/4), then Masters & Rookies is the place to be on Saturdays from May through August. Tuesday nights are for Cats Pro/1/2/3 and Fridays are for the Pro/1. The Pro/1 riders are usually strong US and international contingent.

I know several people that drive up to Ttown from Delaware every Saturday for Mastersa & Rookies. I drive up from Maryland every weekend and I also drive up to NYC for their early spring series on Sundays. Ttown also has Try-the-Track sessions for first timers a few times a year. I volunteer to help the more apprehensive riders during those sessions.

Also, narrow or steel bars aren't all that necessary or all that popular at Ttown. Pretty much 40cm alloy is the standard and there are a smattering of 37/38's and 42's. I've ridden 42's comfortably at Ttown, but I'm currently riding 40s. So, I would recommend to go with whatever makes you comfortable.
dunderhi is offline  
Old 10-13-15, 09:54 PM
  #2675  
Elitist
Thread Starter
 
carleton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 15,965
Liked 93 Times in 78 Posts
This:

Sprints and timed events are a rare sight at Ttown. There's only a couple of opportunities to do a sprint or a pursuit each year. The sprinter vs. enduro terminology isn't used much there because almost everyone is an enduro
might explain this:

narrow or steel bars aren't all that necessary or all that popular at Ttown. Pretty much 40cm alloy is the standard and there are a smattering of 37/38's and 42's.
According to this:

Originally Posted by Baby Puke
If you're an enduro, then someone else here can advise, but 40 is still reasonable because that set-up is closer to a road position generally.
And that's understandable. To be honest, if all the racing I got to do was bunch racing, that would suck balls riding 33cm bars
carleton is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.