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-   -   Ask your small, random, track-related questions here (https://www.bikeforums.net/track-cycling-velodrome-racing-training-area/924726-ask-your-small-random-track-related-questions-here.html)

taras0000 12-24-15 08:02 PM


Originally Posted by carleton (Post 18412720)
The best (and most tasty) way to get the nutrients you need is via eating the right things. Supplements...well...supplement. They "fill in" gaps in your diet.

This is VERY true. Supplements can get expensive very quickly. Supplements have their value once you've been training for a while, have already been eating quite well for a while (and are taking in plenty of calories). They are for filling in the gaps, making up shortfalls, and adding nutrients that are more beneficial to you when you are looking to minimize an EXCESS of calories. Basically, if you are eating well, and eating enough, you will continually make gains unless something is wrong with your training. If you are training correctly, eating enough, eating right, and the gains have slowed or stopped, THEN it's time to consider supplements.


Originally Posted by carleton (Post 18412720)
But, the best advice I can give a young athlete is: Train a lot. Eat a lot of home-cooked food. Drink lots of water. You don't need anything from GNC.

While it IS possible to nerd-out on caloric values, macro-nutrients, amino acids, etc... understand that the body is an amazing machine. It will take damn-near anything and turn it into fuel.

To go along with this, LEARN TO COOK! Start with a few basic but wholesome meals. Master them until you can cook them from memory quite easily. Then experiment with spices to see how they influence your tastes. Branch out from there. You can always alter recipes to suit your needs as well. I basically double the meat and protein in most of the recipes that I come across. Be aware of what foods constitute good protein sources. It's not always meat that makes for an abundant protein source (although my Meat-Tooth says it's the tastiest). Broccoli is very high in protein as well as fiber. Protein and green veggies should be a part of every meal. Then throw in the colourful stuff as it's chock full of good stuff for you. Finish your meal with carby/starchy foods and adjust these to your caloric output. If you're really putting in the miles and hours, you'll need the carbs to fuel your workouts. Don't be afraid of fat as well. Good fats (these include saturated fats) are essential to any diet. Fats are more than just a fuel, they are essential for proper hormonal production, cell building/rebuilding, and nervous system function.

Best thing to do is to just EAT GOOD FOOD, LOTS OF IT. Later on you can revisit the idea of supplementation, but unless your progress stalls, or you're looking to watch your caloric intake (or boost it), you won't really need the protein shakes. If you want to supplement early on, stick with a good quality Multi-Vitamin (taken with a meal). That's the most you'll need to start out.

queerpunk 12-25-15 07:44 PM


Originally Posted by gycho77 (Post 18412377)
Do professional track cyclists drink protein shakes?
and what is the benefit of drinking protein shakes?

Protein rebuilds your muscles after you have damaged them through difficult training.
A good rule of thumb is to eat some protein immediately after a hard workout. It is key to recovery.

If getting enough protein in your meals is hard, or if the timing with workouts and meals doesn't work out well, then a protein shake or bar can be helpful. But, like others said, the best approach is proper food. Eggs, greek yogurt, healthy meat, lentils, and quinoa are examples of foods that have a lot of protein.

JimiMimni 12-25-15 10:04 PM

This book was treated as a definitive text in my sports nutrition classes in grad school. Cannot recommend it highly enough.

http://www.amazon.com/Nutrient-Timin...utrient+Timing

That will answer any and all questions you could possibly have.

gycho77 12-25-15 10:30 PM

Thank you everyone who helped me.
I think I have eat more food :p
For few months, I was reducing the amount of food I was eating, but this was a stupid idea.

JimiMimni 12-25-15 11:02 PM


Originally Posted by gycho77 (Post 18414642)
Thank you everyone who helped me.
I think I have eat more food :p
For few months, I was reducing the amount of food I was eating, but this was a stupid idea.

Get a scale and measure at least 2x per week, at the same time (for example wake up, pee, weigh) and keep tabs on your weight. If you see the number rising for longer than a week, you're eating too much (assuming you're not trying to gain weight.). Conversely, if you see the number dropping, you're not eating enough, again assuming you're not trying to lose weight.

gycho77 12-25-15 11:06 PM


Originally Posted by JimiMimni (Post 18414677)
Get a scale and measure at least 2x per week, at the same time (for example wake up, pee, weigh) and keep tabs on your weight. If you see the number rising for longer than a week, you're eating too much (assuming you're not trying to gain weight.). Conversely, if you see the number dropping, you're not eating enough, again assuming you're not trying to lose weight.

I should definitely try that method.
Thank you

carleton 12-25-15 11:56 PM

The key is to buy a quality scale.

The $5 digital scales at Walmart will not work. Try them. If you stand on them 3 times in a row and get 3 different values, then they are crap. A good scale (like Taylor) should give you the same value every time. A good scale will cost around $25 or more. I know this sounds silly, but there are a lot of scales out there that are crap and can be frustrating to use.

I actually picked up a doctor's office scale off of craigslist for pretty cheap. It's even more reliable than the nicer digital scales. But, it takes up lots of space. I like being able to leave the slider in place and then weighing myself again and moving the slider back a bit every now and then (apparently not often enough :D )

As Jimi says, weigh in the morning after using the bathroom and before you drink any water. Nude or with just underwear on (for obvious reasons...a full set of clothing can weigh a couple of lbs). My scales have either been in my bedroom or bathroom. This is your starting state every day. If you weigh yourself throughout the day, you will see that you can gain up to 5lbs of food and water.

Use your favorite fitness tracking app to save the values. The Apple Health app is good for this and it comes free with iOS 8 and above.

You'll find that salt will have an unexpectedly huge impact on how much you weigh. We need salt for electrolytes and whatnot. Water binds with salt. Water is heavy. If you eat a lot of salty foods, then you may gain a bunch of water retention weight all of a sudden.

I freaked out once when I went on a business trip for a week and was resigned to eating in restaurants the whole time. Even though I ate reasonable portions, I came back 7lbs heavier. A guy here on BF informed me that it was just water weight from all of the salt in restaurant food and that it would go away in a few days. And it did.

BTW, don't obsess about weight. It's just one of the many factors that make a good racer.

carleton 12-25-15 11:58 PM

PS: DO NOT get nude and try out scales in Walmart to see if they show the same value every time. This is not a good idea. TRUST ME. I'm speaking from experience :D

gycho77 12-26-15 12:41 AM

Are you a genius?
How did you know that I don't have a scale lol
I was planning to order it from amazon and forgot about craigslist.
I should check out craigslist first.
Thanks


Originally Posted by carleton (Post 18414714)
PS: DO NOT get nude and try out scales in Walmart to see if they show the same value every time. This is not a good idea. TRUST ME. I'm speaking from experience :D

haha
Really funny:roflmao2:

taras0000 12-26-15 04:42 PM


Originally Posted by carleton (Post 18414714)
PS: DO NOT get nude and try out scales in Walmart to see if they show the same value every time. This is not a good idea. TRUST ME. I'm speaking from experience :D

Also, when at the beach, make sure that you put the potato in the FRONT of your Speedo.

gtrob 12-27-15 10:19 AM

Haven't been on in a bit and like where this thread is going! :P

I will echo the cooking sentiment, I don't think there is better advice to give to anyone who cares even slightly about performance/weight/fitness/life. Not only do you have full control of ingredients and portions, but it all tastes better, and is better for you. You naturally eat healthier, with less salt, fat, and all the other things you don't even realize are in your food. Plus chicks love it.

And buy a blender. One of those cheap single cup ones, and fill your freezer with frozen berries. A scoop of whey and you have ~30gr protein and 2+ servings of fruit in about 20 seconds of prep, perfect pre/post workout you can literally make on your way out the door.

700wheel 12-27-15 03:45 PM

Nutrition
 
I have a copy of the USDA "Nutritive Value of Foods" which I use often when modifying my diet sometime I find when a particular food is hyped this is one of the first places I check.

This publication can be found here:
http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles.../hg72_2002.pdf

Regulatori 01-03-16 03:10 AM

I'm picking up a set of rollers and colder weather gear for some off season training and want to hit the beginner classes next season at our local velodrome.

My current bike setup is in my signature (or Bianchi Pista - Pedal Room ) Is there anything major I might want to change? I'm currently running a 47t front and have access from 14-18t rears (I know I'll only be using the low cogs). Yeah, I know the color scheme may not be for everyone but from just a setup standpoint, is there is anything I might want to pick up over winter?

Only thing I can think of is I'll try to find a used 48t chainring at a local shop and possibly look at some more track orientated tires, different bar tape (mine is a bit slippery), and get my wheels trued.

Anything else I may want to change or do you think this is a great setup for beginner class (I would be taking classes first of course before entering any real races).

Thanks a lot. Think I did pretty good...I got the bike for a screaming deal on craigslists, bought most of the upgrades used, off craigslist, ebay, etc... and probably have $500 total in the bike (including the bike purchase).

Thanks.

TrackMonkey7 01-03-16 12:23 PM

Wow, that's a really handsome bike and for a great price!

For someone starting out racing track, that bike is just fine. For your first few race days, you probably won't want or need much more than a 47/48x15 but in the future you'll want some chainrings.

Depending on what your home track is like, you might want some bar tape with more cushion.

carleton 01-03-16 02:08 PM


Originally Posted by Regulatori (Post 18431731)
I'm picking up a set of rollers and colder weather gear for some off season training and want to hit the beginner classes next season at our local velodrome.

My current bike setup is in my signature (or Bianchi Pista - Pedal Room ) Is there anything major I might want to change? I'm currently running a 47t front and have access from 14-18t rears (I know I'll only be using the low cogs). Yeah, I know the color scheme may not be for everyone but from just a setup standpoint, is there is anything I might want to pick up over winter?

Only thing I can think of is I'll try to find a used 48t chainring at a local shop and possibly look at some more track orientated tires, different bar tape (mine is a bit slippery), and get my wheels trued.

Anything else I may want to change or do you think this is a great setup for beginner class (I would be taking classes first of course before entering any real races).

Thanks a lot. Think I did pretty good...I got the bike for a screaming deal on craigslists, bought most of the upgrades used, off craigslist, ebay, etc... and probably have $500 total in the bike (including the bike purchase).

Thanks.

Hi, and welcome to the sport!

1) Have a look at this thread. It should answer most questions you'll have as a new racer: http://www.bikeforums.net/track-cycl...ack-racer.html Pay attention to the parts about beginner gearing and tools you'll need.

2) The "bars on the front tire" look is great for photos on the internet...but awfully uncomfortable (for most people) for actual training and racing. I'd suggest being prepared to raise them.
http://www.pedalroom.com/p/bianchi-pista-26512_1.jpg

3) I'd suggest looking into getting a quill to threadless stem adapter so you can use modern stems. If you are a new racer, chances are you will spend time fiddling with your fit. Quill stems severely limit your fit options. Switching stems is a pain. You have to unwrap your bars (and maybe buy new grip tape) to put on a new stem. Alternate stems are expensive and hard to find. If you need a longer/shorter stem, you can't just grab one from a local shop or craigslist. Hell, it was hard to do that when NJS stuff was popular. It's even harder now.

4) The Shimano 7401 pedals are old...back when Shimano first got into making clipless pedals. LOOK made them for Shimano. If I remember correctly, the tension on these is very light. Look into getting some modern Shimano road pedals for like $35 new.

5) Unless your tires are hardened with age, they are fine. If they are grippy then they are fine.

6) Not sure why you have so many zip ties under your saddle. But, if it is not working properly, then replace it. If it falls off while you are on the track while you are riding (and I've seen this happen several times) then you have a BIG problem on your hands.

7) Nobody cares how your bike looks when training/racing. We only care that it is in good working order.


Understand that what's "good" on the street fixie scene may not (and is probably not) good on the actual racing scene. It's like comparing the street import car scene to actual import car racing scene. Yes, there are some similarities, but they are more different than similar.

I've seen bikes like these (and other "FULL NJS" bikes...caged pedals and all) show up at beginner classes and if the racer sticks with the sport they ditch that stuff for modern gear after a few months. So, you can do it now, or do it later...but you are still gonna do it :D

700wheel 01-03-16 05:24 PM

Regulatori,
Always make sure your chain connector link is properly installed (hard to tell from your photos). I've seen riders lose chains which poses a danger to both you and other riders.

taras0000 01-03-16 08:54 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by 700wheel (Post 18433025)
Regulatori,
Always make sure your chain connector link is properly installed (hard to tell from your photos). I've seen riders lose chains which poses a danger to both you and other riders.

YES! Always use the links with threaded link pins, or ones with a circlip. Do not use quicklinks/snap links on a fixed drivetrain. If using a circlip, make sure the closed end is leading the open end. http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=496536

Regulatori 01-04-16 03:15 AM


Originally Posted by TrackMonkey7 (Post 18432371)
Wow, that's a really handsome bike and for a great price!

For someone starting out racing track, that bike is just fine. For your first few race days, you probably won't want or need much more than a 47/48x15 but in the future you'll want some chainrings.

Depending on what your home track is like, you might want some bar tape with more cushion.

Totally agree about the bar tape. Probably go back to using Fizik. This stuff was more of an impulse buy but I find it gets really slippery in the wet.
There is a couple of used shops nearby that sell chainrings for cheap. I might pick up a 48 if I can find one for a good deal. I'm good for cogs thought.

Regulatori 01-04-16 03:33 AM


Originally Posted by carleton (Post 18432606)
Hi, and welcome to the sport!

1) Have a look at this thread. It should answer most questions you'll have as a new racer: http://www.bikeforums.net/track-cycl...ack-racer.html Pay attention to the parts about beginner gearing and tools you'll need.

2) The "bars on the front tire" look is great for photos on the internet...but awfully uncomfortable (for most people) for actual training and racing. I'd suggest being prepared to raise them.
http://www.pedalroom.com/p/bianchi-pista-26512_1.jpg

3) I'd suggest looking into getting a quill to threadless stem adapter so you can use modern stems. If you are a new racer, chances are you will spend time fiddling with your fit. Quill stems severely limit your fit options. Switching stems is a pain. You have to unwrap your bars (and maybe buy new grip tape) to put on a new stem. Alternate stems are expensive and hard to find. If you need a longer/shorter stem, you can't just grab one from a local shop or craigslist. Hell, it was hard to do that when NJS stuff was popular. It's even harder now.

4) The Shimano 7401 pedals are old...back when Shimano first got into making clipless pedals. LOOK made them for Shimano. If I remember correctly, the tension on these is very light. Look into getting some modern Shimano road pedals for like $35 new.

5) Unless your tires are hardened with age, they are fine. If they are grippy then they are fine.

6) Not sure why you have so many zip ties under your saddle. But, if it is not working properly, then replace it. If it falls off while you are on the track while you are riding (and I've seen this happen several times) then you have a BIG problem on your hands.

7) Nobody cares how your bike looks when training/racing. We only care that it is in good working order.


Understand that what's "good" on the street fixie scene may not (and is probably not) good on the actual racing scene. It's like comparing the street import car scene to actual import car racing scene. Yes, there are some similarities, but they are more different than similar.

I've seen bikes like these (and other "FULL NJS" bikes...caged pedals and all) show up at beginner classes and if the racer sticks with the sport they ditch that stuff for modern gear after a few months. So, you can do it now, or do it later...but you are still gonna do it :D

1. Thanks for the link. Can't believe I missed that.

2. I'm a really wiry guy. I may raise them up but even for fun I'll get in the drops on a regular ride and go for a good 15-20 min and never have any discomfort. I'm 5'10 and around 155 but pretty flexible. Since I'm running a quill, I could always try to find drops that aren't so deep on craigslist.

3. Yeah, that was actually kind of a choice and I knew it would limit me. The regular fork was a unicrown/threadless and I ended up converting to threaded/quill for purely aesthetics. I did have a local shop do a quick fit on me and recommended a 90mm as a good start so I'll see how that goes. I do have my old parts still so I can convert back to threadless if I have to. What threaded to threadless adapter do you recommmend? Any in particular?

4. Yeah, the pedals are old but built like tanks. Triple loose bearings, lots of clearance. I have them on the lowest setting right now and they feel like my old 525's at a mid-high setting. @TejanoTrackie actually recommended me these pedals because he's been using them on his racing bikes for years. I put them on a higher setting at one point and felt like my cleats were going to rip out of my shoes. They might be ugly and heavy but they're surprisingly overbuilt. I might switch to the black Delta cleats for no float but I plan on keeping them.

5. Thanks. Yeah, the tires are new. I just wasn't sure if it's a good tire for concrete velodromes. Do you recommend going max psi on them?

6. hahaha....the zip ties only there to attach a rear carabiner. I then hook a Nalgene bottle to the carabiner when going on longer rides as sort of a poorman's rear bottle setup since the bike has no bottle mounts. All of that would be coming off soon as I hit the track because they last thing people need is garbage falling off a bike.

Thanks a lot for your help.
BTW...you into cars? I saw the car mention. I've had a LOT....bunch of Honda's with motor swaps/ITB's, Miata with a cage/coilovers, 240Z with a 3.1 stroker/triple 44 Mikuni's, a couple of old 911s (911SC and a 964 C2), etc.. Totally get your point though. I've driven a few purpose built track cars on the street and there is nothing fun about it.

JimiMimni 01-04-16 09:03 AM

How do you prefer to write workouts? Coming from the road I write everything in watts and minutes. I'm gradually learning meters, laps, and gear inches.

Do you guys typically script everything? I.E. Race-Warm-up; 3x500m Flying efforts 92" w/5min recovery + 2x 20-lap @50kph 91" w/5min recovery (Just an example!) I know pretty roughly what I want to get accomplished with my training sessions, but I'm curious how others sort out their sessions.

Regulatori 01-04-16 09:12 AM


Originally Posted by 700wheel (Post 18433025)
Regulatori,
Always make sure your chain connector link is properly installed (hard to tell from your photos). I've seen riders lose chains which poses a danger to both you and other riders.

Thanks, that is one I did know. You can kind of see it in this photo above the chainring to the left.
Bianchi Pista - Pedal Room

When installing, I imagine an octopus swimming ahead in the direction of chain travel....and with his tentacles dragging behind. If that makes sense.

gycho77 01-08-16 10:13 PM

2 Attachment(s)
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=497405http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=497406
I am really sorry about keep asking questions....
But I'm having trouble with my broken chain tensioner.(Currently ignoring the tensioner, and training on a roller)
I used it once or twice, and broke the bolt....:cry:
I cannot take out the tensioner because of the screwed bolt(2nd picture).
Does anyone had this experience?
Tried WD-40 to remove the screw, but I failed
I am not using an another chain tensioner again:crash:

MarkWW 01-09-16 08:29 AM

This is how I would fix that, assuming minimal bike tools. Bolt the wheel next to your bike. By that I mean bolt the left side of the wheel in the right side of the track end so the wheel is next to the bike. Basically all you want to do is immobilize the axle. Then take a wrench and try to turn the tensioner counter clock-wise until the screw end falls into the groove in the axle meant for the notched washer. That might give you enough purchase for the whole tensioner to slide off.

700wheel 01-10-16 11:13 AM

If that does not work remove the axle then saw though the retainer (washer like) part. Then clean axle thoroughly and reinstall.

carleton 01-10-16 11:41 AM


Originally Posted by gycho77 (Post 18445932)
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=497405http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=497406
I am really sorry about keep asking questions....
But I'm having trouble with my broken chain tensioner.(Currently ignoring the tensioner, and training on a roller)
I used it once or twice, and broke the bolt....:cry:
I cannot take out the tensioner because of the screwed bolt(2nd picture).
Does anyone had this experience?
Tried WD-40 to remove the screw, but I failed
I am not using an another chain tensioner again:crash:

You don't need a chain tensioner when riding rollers. Nobody does (not even top sprinters) because you never put down any torque using rollers. You probably won't need one on the track.

Those types of tensioners are a pain in the butt when it comes to removing the wheel. I'd suggest not using it unless you actually pull a wheel during a standing start or something.

Chain tensioners solve a particular problem (pulling a wheel under high torque). You aren't a big rider. I don't think you'll have issues pulling wheels. Why bother with the headache of a tensioner?

Also, you don't need a tensioner to set your wheel in the dropouts. A lot of people think that's their purpose. It is not. You set the wheel, tighten the axle nuts, then snug the tensioner.



(You probably don't need one)


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