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Goal: lower monthly grocery budget from $300 to $200

Old 01-23-16, 07:26 PM
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longe
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Goal: lower monthly grocery budget from $300 to $200

I currently budget 300 per month for food, but if I knock off 100 per month, that's a grand I can put toward other financial goals. I race and train lots so probably average 3000k calories per day. Has anyone here tried to maintain a budget? How do you eat clean for cheap?
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Old 01-23-16, 07:29 PM
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I shop at two grocery stores that have a Clearance Section.

Helps me some.
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Old 01-23-16, 08:39 PM
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Do you have both kidneys?
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Old 01-24-16, 12:52 AM
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I might pick up a 25/50lb bag of brown rice and a large amount of beans (dry). Those are cheap and can make the base for some pretty good meals. Pop an egg on, avocado, tomato/cilantro/lime juice/Tapatio and that could cover you for a bit.

P

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Old 01-24-16, 03:20 AM
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Originally Posted by longe View Post
I currently budget 300 per month for food, but if I knock off 100 per month, that's a grand I can put toward other financial goals. I race and train lots so probably average 3000k calories per day. Has anyone here tried to maintain a budget? How do you eat clean for cheap?

That might depend where you live. You're not going to be eating much on $50/week where we live.


The only advice I'd have is commons sense: buy on sale and in season.
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Old 01-24-16, 03:35 AM
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Pulses. Beans and lentils. Lentils, especially, are nutritionally superb and dirt cheap.
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Old 01-24-16, 04:15 AM
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Here you go ... Making do can teach you a lot about life
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Old 01-24-16, 08:30 AM
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With gas below $2/gal, driving my small SUV 30 miles has ~1/2 the fuel cost of riding my bike the same distance with what I pay for groceries on average.
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Old 01-30-16, 08:39 AM
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Garden and/or hunt? I prepare many meals that the only thing I didn't get myself from the land was salt and pepper.

Of course I don't do enough of that, but one day I'd like to be mostly self sufficient.

At the store, to buy stuff guaranteed to be chemical/pesticide/herbicide free you need to spend a lot more. It is a shame that pure food - the way it has always been, is now a luxury that brings a premium.

Food, I would not necessarily try to go super cheap on. Have you look elsewhere to do budget cuts? I dropped my cell phone from an old $55 plan down to $10 plan. I also ditched my trash pickup, I generate so little trash I just bring in a small grocery bag of trash into work every week or two (I recycle and compost a lot though). Also no cable or anything, but I did split the cost of a $9 netflix subscription with a friend. I slashed my monthly utility type bills a huge amount... not even including heating a cooling (no a/c and I heat with mostly free firewood... savings are in thousands each year!).
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Old 01-30-16, 02:49 PM
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It is close to garden planting season. Some people also have a few chickens in their back yards.

In the summer, I have a lot of blackberries, and homegrown fruit.

Minimize what food goes in the trash.

And, pay attention to what you're buying. Generics?

Thinking about it. When I'm in Portland and walk to the store for convenience, my food budget goes through the roof. When I'm in Springfield, and might do a monthly big trip to the store, plus a couple of little fill-in trips, I can keep my costs under control.
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Old 01-30-16, 05:42 PM
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$200/month is very ambitious for someone wanting to consume 3,000 Kcal of nutritious food per day. I'm not saying it can't be done but you are going to have to watch every penny and eliminate waste.

Carbs: coarse milled or steel cut oats in bulk; brown rice in bulk or large packages; dried beans, peas, lentils (also provide quite a bit of protein); in season vegatables like onions, peppers, summer squash, zuchinni, berries (frozen without added sugar are cheap and easy to store); bananas etc.
Fats: cold (expeller) pressed olive and almond oil (not "cheap" but stick with using less of better quality ingredients); coconut oil; nuts including peanuts; avocados; oily fish like mackerel and salmon (also a good source of protein).
Proteins: eggs; boneless/skinless chicken thighs; turkey or chicken (not processed turkey deli meat, whole raw bird or breast); fish (again not cheap but smaller quantities of better quality food); Greek yogurt. Whey protein concentrate powder from a food co-op is actually a very good value gram for gram of protein.

Do:
- Visit farmers markets, food co-ops, etc. (ride a bike with panniers and kill two birds with one stone)
- Work with friends/family to purchase bulk or family pack items at a discount and divide them up, sharing the savings
- Learn to store food properly, vacuum sealing, canning, drying, freezing are all excellent ways to get the most out of your food purchases. Waste is your enemy.
- Along the same lines, get the maximum out of every food item. For example; instead of eating your chicken or turkey off the bone and throwing away the leftovers, debone the cooked poultry and make a stock with the bones, skin and other leftover parts along with the trimmings from your vegetables or any vegetables that are nearing the end of their refrigerator life.
- Watch for sales and discounted items but make sure that sale items are foods you actually want/need and that any "discount" items are within date and can be used or stored properly quickly.
- If you have the time and inclination, you can raise a lot of food in a small area. Some apartment dwellers even have patio or balcony gardens. Many communities have co-op gardens where multiple individuals tend a large garden for a share of the produce.
- Do you own cooking. Pre-cooked, processed, packaged convenience foods are expensive. If you don't have a lot of time, learn to use a crock-pot, it's amazing the variety of meals that can be prepared in just minutes and allowed to cook throughtout the afteroon.
- Utilize every edible bit of foods. For example: celery leaves are great in soups and stews, beet greens can be sauteed, fennel fronds are just as edible as the bulbs.
- Pick frozen over canned. Most fruits and vegetables are frozen within hours or a couple days of harvest with much less processing than canned produce. They also usually have less added salt and sugar. When you buy canned foods, remember that a portion of the weight stated is water in the can. The weight on frozen foods is usually all edible produce.

Don't:
- buy large quantities or bulk items that you cannot use or properly store before they outdate
- buy low nutritional density "filler" foods that contribute little other than calories. Think nutritional density ie "How much nutrition per $ am I getting?"
- buy cheap convenience foods that are usually a bunch of cheap low-nutritional density carbs and poor quality or very small portions of protein
- start skipping meals to save money. You are better off eating a small nutritionally dense meal or snack.
- buy cheap fast food even off the $dollar menu. Even if it is cheap, it is no bargain if it doesn't supply a decent amount of nutrition.

Last edited by GravelMN; 01-31-16 at 03:34 AM.
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Old 01-30-16, 05:56 PM
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Originally Posted by longe View Post
...... Has anyone here tried to maintain a budget?
I laughed out loud when I read that. Everyone I know lives on some sort of a budget. I am sure there must be some people with limitless amounts of money. But I don't know who they are.

The costliest food are foods with added value! In other words... a cake costs more than a cake mix... because the bakery added that value to the ingredients.

Eggs, milk, and chicken are some of your best protein buys.

Fresh vegetables are very reasonably priced... canned veggies are cheap too. In season fruits are low priced. Bananas are rarely much more than 50 cents a pound.

Bulk bags of rice (20-25 pound bags) is still dirt cheap ($5-6).

Of course... eating cheap doesn't mean eating healthy. But you can eat healthy while eating cheap. Try one of the free diet apps that you can use to monitor/chart your food intake to control your carbs/protein/calories/fat/.....etc.
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Old 01-30-16, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by longe View Post
How do you eat clean for cheap?
Being proficient in the cooking techniques of poor people from a culture that you find tasty will yield inexpensive healthy meals that actually Taste Good.

Do you Braise inexpensive cuts of meat for savory meals?
Do you Stir Fry?
Do you make Soups and Stews?
Do you bake bread and make pasta?
Can you make an omelet?

It's not just about the available ingredients but how they are prepared and presented with well seasoned variety and welcome that make a good meal.



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Old 01-30-16, 07:49 PM
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You people who live in the USA are lucky to have cheaper food, here is Canada food and beer is a lot more expensive then in the US...I eat the same foods every day nothing too exotic, just simple basic foodstuffs which I rotate daily, some of the foodstuffs I buy in bulk. Here is my list of foods which allows me to keep my budget within $350-400 dollar range. I don't think I could live on $200 per month.

Protein foods:
- chicken breast
- pork chops
- eggs
- kefir or yogurt
- cottage cheese

Carbohydrates:
- steel cut oats
- white potatoes
- winter squash
- white rice
- yellow split peas

Fats:
- dairy butter
- olive oil
- tahini

Vegetables:
- sweet peppers
- garlick
- onions
- zuchinni
- olives
- canned fire roasted tomatoes

Fruits:
- bananas
- frozen berries

Spices:
- sriracha sauce
- sea salt
- meat marinade

Drinks:
- coffee
- tea
- beer
- soy milk

Supplements:
- whey protein powder
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Old 01-30-16, 08:01 PM
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I went through a phase when I ate nothing but peanut butter and honey or jam on whole wheat bread. I usually ate 7/day of those. So that's 14 slices of bread, say 2/3 loaf, or 20 loaves/month at current prices for the real stuff, $100. PB and sweetener would be less than $100. There's also the brown rice diet, practiced by millions, where you eat mostly brown rice with condiments, a lot of it. That'd also be under you limit.
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Old 02-04-16, 12:42 PM
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Focus on potatoes. Lots and lots of potatoes. Actually very healthy and very cheap (10 cents a pound is not unusual in larger bags, and they last for a while if stored properly). Also, look to see if there is a produce store in your area that buys overstock from local grocery chains. The one I shop at has prices that are typically 50% less than of grocery store prices (and sometimes much lower than 50%).

Whole Health Source: The Potato Diet

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Old 02-04-16, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Spld cyclist View Post
Focus on potatoes. Lots and lots of potatoes. Actually very healthy and very cheap (10 cents a pound is not unusual in larger bags, and they last for a while if stored properly).
^^This-- with carrots/celery/seasonal veg/fruit. Large pieces of lean-meat you can portion throughout the week by cutting yourself.^^
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Old 02-04-16, 04:58 PM
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I was once unemployed for over a year. That limited my budget to say the least.

I cut down on meat quite a bit. Eggs was the only animal protein I ate the majority of the time. A dozen eggs shouldn't cost much.

The rest was rice and veggies - lots of veggies. Once in a while I broke down and bought a 99 cent burger or chicken sandwich from McDonalds (avoid this example if possible).

Avocado is great for controlling appetite but if you're not in California or other appropriate locale, it can be too expensive.
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Old 02-04-16, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by longe View Post
I currently budget 300 per month for food, but if I knock off 100 per month, that's a grand I can put toward other financial goals. I race and train lots so probably average 3000k calories per day. Has anyone here tried to maintain a budget? How do you eat clean for cheap?
For one person?

I'm surprised you get by on that much.

Fresh fruits, vegetables and meat aren't cheap. Or are you planning on getting fast on ramen?

Originally Posted by GovernorSilver View Post

I cut down on meat quite a bit. Eggs was the only animal protein I ate the majority of the time. A dozen eggs shouldn't cost much.

Check the price of any farm or free range eggs. They're $3+ a dozen around here.
Corporate grown plain white eggs are around $2.50.

@wolfchild, our grocery list is a lot like yours, only no rice, potatoes, bread or beer and a lot more broccoli and mushrooms.

Last edited by andr0id; 02-04-16 at 05:23 PM.
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Old 02-04-16, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by MixedRider View Post
Large pieces of lean-meat you can portion throughout the week by cutting yourself.
Knife skills in the kitchen come in handy: break down whole primals into individual portions instead of paying the butcher to do it for you.
I do that chore for a group of friends who all "go in" on a large quality purchase vac-packed at a warehouse club.
Sharing expenses saves everyone $, assures quality and promotes meal sharing: Why eat your own cooking ( as good as it is ) all of the time?

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Old 02-04-16, 05:56 PM
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The important thing is, how expensive is your oatmeal recipe? :-D

People have been mentioning eggs... The price of eggs here in CA about doubled last summer and has stayed high, $3.50/doz. The new cage law came into effect, and there was a bird flu outbreak.

Sometimes it seemed to me like there was a tax on being single. If you have the time and inclination to do all the chopping and carving and freezing of large items then it will save you, but it's definitely messy and time-consuming.

Careful with the bulk stuff. We have a chain here called Winco that has a lot of cheap bulk food. The Safeway emulates their bulk section, but they sell name brand stuff that isn't any cheaper than it is in bags.

Persevere with the cooking, don't eat out!
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Old 02-04-16, 06:05 PM
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Originally Posted by andr0id View Post
Check the price of any farm or free range eggs. They're $3+ a dozen around here.
Corporate grown plain white eggs are around $2.50.
I guess you are trying to say you consider that expensive. For me, that is not. If the OP eats 2 a day, he can make a dozen last about a week. $12 a month. Ok, $15 if you include tax.

Anyway, I just threw it out there as a suggestion. There are hardly any other choices for a cheaper source of animal protein than eggs. If you know of something better feel free to contribute. Eggs are cheaper than chicken, pork, beef...

Going all vegetarian would be even cheaper but after looking at that Vegan thread, I'm staying the hell out of that argument.

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Old 02-04-16, 06:16 PM
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A McDouble and a small fries comes to $2.17 x30 days= about $60. Eat that twice a day and you're around $120 a month. oh you want to eat clean. Someone said if you're riding all the time you don't need to eat clean but yea. No ones mentioned pasta. That used to be the go to thing. Mirroring the poorer cultures as some have said and already mentioned rice, beans and chicken as your cheapest meat option. You could go old school and look into eating liver, tonque, possibly lamb and other things Americans don't normally eat anymore. In China they ate a lot of stomach and intestines, pigs feet, pig snout, pig ears if you can find any of that. Ground beef can be a treat, make some chilli and save some, succotash with fresh veggies or canned with rice. Ravioli and get the sauce in cans not glass, you pay mostly for those nice glass jars you throw away and are worth more than the 9 ounces of sauce that's in it. Certainly you want to make your own sauce with tomato paste. Ramen! all day long. Pot luck dinners, church socials and homeless shelters may be an option too. I knew a Guatamalen dude who would eat a banana covered with honey for lunch. May have been some rice in there or something. You can catch fish or buy some fish. I don't eat it much, I know some are less valued and can be prepared in special ways. Ceviche and if you're brave enough to try Cui (guinea pig). I wonder if they sell the meat anywhere and what the law says about buying a guinea pig rom the pet shop and eating it and how economical that would be. Avocado and mayonnaise pack high calories in small space. I havn't tried yet but I had my eye on a middle eastern dish forget the name. It's tomatoes, onions stewed and some eggs cooked on top when its almost done. Has a funny name, eaten in Israel and by the Arabs, shashushka I think. Plantains, yams, sweet potatoe are African stapes. Think what grandma used to make but you would never eat at her house.

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Old 02-04-16, 06:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
If you have the time and inclination to do all the chopping and carving and freezing of large items then it will save you, but it's definitely messy and time-consuming.
All of that time could be spent updating Face-Critter or perusing Strava: Doing something Useful.
Knowing what you are eating by sourcing, prepping, seasoning, preparing and serving makes a Cuisine: time and $ well spent for me.




French Onion Soup, Pulled Pork, Ribs: Cheap & Tasty peasant food.

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Old 02-04-16, 06:59 PM
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...guinea pigs?
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