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Tread climber for more pedaling strength.

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Tread climber for more pedaling strength.

Old 06-21-17, 10:24 AM
  #26  
caloso
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Originally Posted by 12strings View Post
While it seems a no-brainer to acknowledge that many/most cyclists pull up at various points in their pedalling...

...It also seems like common sense to acknowledge that running up stairs would HAVE to benefit cycling fitness. How could it not?
It's not even stair running. The OP said it was a machine, which the OP is hoping to encourage his wife to use. Will it help his "peddling [sic] strength"? Sure. Is it as beneficial as actually riding his bike? Doubtful.
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Old 06-21-17, 12:08 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Not this 26 y.o. study again, which proves that riders on a perfectly flat course, on TT bikes, pedaling a high cadence . . . don't pull up on the backstroke. Yes, that was probably true back in the day.
Yeah, that's the main fault of this study. It was done on ergometers, which simulate time trialing on a dead flat course - as you say.

BITD we would have pedaled a flat time trial at a high cadence concentrating on spinning. Any upstroke would have been minimal and somewhat incidental, perhaps about equal to the weight of your foot/leg assembly. This is exactly what the study shows.

Real roads are not always dead flat. When climbing, the slope can vary over short distances. Pulling up allows you to increase your torque and get through a steep section without shifting gears. Granted, this was more of an issue in the past when we had fewer gears for climbing (and friction shifting). For the same reason (no low gears) people used to climb out of the saddle more than they do now.

Another situation where upstroke comes in is when riding on slightly rolling terrain. If you get to a small rise, say 100 feet or something, adding some upstroke makes it easier to kind of turbo over it, and maintain your velocity.

Lastly, varying your stroke lets you shift your working muscle groups around a bit, which can be helpful in giving them a bit of a break on a long climb or whatever.
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Old 06-21-17, 12:12 PM
  #28  
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RE the OT

Strictly speaking, a stairmaster type machine won't help your cycling strength as much as the same time spent cycling. However, if the machine gives you a convenient ability to workout when otherwise you wouldn't have, it will help.
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Old 06-22-17, 10:12 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Salamandrine View Post
Another situation where upstroke comes in is when riding on slightly rolling terrain. If you get to a small rise, say 100 feet or something, adding some upstroke makes it easier to kind of turbo over it, and maintain your velocity.
It's just as easy to put out additional power using the same pedal stroke before the hill. It's not hard on rolling hills to double the power output on hills which isn't going to come from pulling up.

If you're riding at or below threshold most riders have between 15 and 30kJ of anaerobic work capacity to be doled out when necessary. That's enough for an extra 100W for 2.5 to 5 min or 300W for 50 to 100 Seconds.

I think if you have underused muscles your pedal stroke is probably sub-optimal. Ideally, all of ones muscles (used for cycling) should fatigue at similar rates.
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