Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-17-17, 05:29 PM   #1
JoeBotters
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Protein - Help wanted!

I would like to know if protein supplements are worth it? If so should I look at pre/post/during exercise etc

Bit of background...

Very new to this and only been riding a few weeks, in just over 6 months myself and 4 friends are looking to complete a 200 mile bike ride over two days for charity. I'm not unfit but not exceptionally fit either. I currently have started cycling to and from work (just 4 miles) and heading out a couple of times a week for 10 miles. Increasing to 20 miles in the next two weeks. (Obviously increasing distance in time)

As I stated this is very early stage for me and I have a long and challenging road ahead, and would like to know at what stage, if any stage, should I consider protein supplements, in what form and when

Any help is massively appreciated. Thank you
JoeBotters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-17, 05:47 PM   #2
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
Posts: 35,300
Mentioned: 105 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3645 Post(s)
IMO and only IMO, you shouldn't need supplements. A steadily growing training routine, involving rides at least twice a week and a decent balanced diet is all that's needed.

A decent diet is like a nutrient schmorgasbord for your cells. They'll pick and choose what they need from what's there, and you'll pee the excess out.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-17, 08:42 PM   #3
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
Posts: 12,861
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 800 Post(s)
My general theory is: if your legs hurt on the bike, you probably aren't getting enough protein. Which doesn't have to take the form of a supplement, better to be part of your regular diet.

I had a vegetarian employee who rode a hilly commute 32 miles round-trip to work 5 days/week. After a couple weeks, his legs just wouldn't do it anymore, I prescribed a protein supplement at the end of each commute ride and that fixed him right up.

Years ago I was starting to do a lot of miles, 60-100 mile rides every week plus training. My legs got to hurting and wouldn't work anymore. I'm an ovo-lacto vegetarian but still wasn't getting enough. I started using whey protein and still do.

So, in general if your legs quit working for you and, as I said, they hurt while riding, consider getting more protein. For most people, drinking a glass of milk with a little sugar stirred into it after a ride takes care of the issue.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-17, 03:09 AM   #4
JoeBotters
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Ok super thanks. My diet isn't the greatest yet and is something I know that needs planning and working on. I might see how it goes when I start riding further and then revisiting protein intake.
JoeBotters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-17, 07:29 AM   #5
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint
Posts: 18,016
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1436 Post(s)
when is the charity ride? back to back 100 mile rides is a significant challenge, especially for a new rider regardless of what you consume
rumrunn6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-17, 09:33 AM   #6
Leisesturm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 3,190
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 748 Post(s)
In 2017 food is NOT what it was in 1917. Oh I get that modern factory farms make more food available than could ever have been contemplated 100 years ago but it is not nearly as nutritious. So... to imagine that there might be excess nutrients to be 'pee'd' out from a diet that does not include supplemental vitamins, minerals and perhaps protein is optomistic in the extreme.

That being said, IMO the main issue of the o.p.'s project is the potential for crippling saddle soreness or other overuse injuries of the lower body. 6 months is a very short time to properly acclimate a human body to something like 200 miles in two days. I'd want a recumbent. Calories more than protein are also more likely to be the nutrient in short supply over the 200 mile distance. What is the plan for supplying calories and/or hydration? But, and I'm serious, anyone reading this, if in addition to decent diet, you are not also consuming a comprehensive multi-vitamin, multi-mineral daily vitamin, often, if not daily, you are having a sub-optimal experience on planet Earth.
Leisesturm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-17, 11:00 AM   #7
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
Posts: 12,861
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 800 Post(s)
6 months isn't much time to get into good enough condition to ride that second century. Increase weekly mileage by 10% a week until you get into the 150 miles/week area. You'll probably have to slow that increase down as you get near 100 miles/week. Weekly mileage is the most important marker for success. Ideally, you'd like to be doing ~180 miles/week by then, but that seems unlikely. It's pretty amazing how much harder it is to ride 80 miles than 40 when you're just starting out. You're going to have to figure out a lot of somewhat complicated stuff with little room for mistakes.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-17, 12:28 PM   #8
FrenchFit 
The Left Coast, USA
 
FrenchFit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Bikes: Bianchi, Koga-Miyata, Trek, Miyata, Barracuda
Posts: 3,337
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 148 Post(s)
As a old runner that does regular hill interval training a protein supplemental seems pretty essential to me. It seems to aid in recovery as well as putting on leg muscle. I use Vega's protein Sport, which is plant based.

Post-run, instead of sugars.
FrenchFit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-17, 01:56 PM   #9
JoeBotters
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Thanks for your replies. It's safe to say I've not officially commited to anything yet, and don't want to until I've started stepping up to much longer rides and great miles per week. Looks like I am being over optimistic in the time frame!

Looking at what you are all saying, is it safe to say that if I started taking protein supplements, it would do no harm, but potentially could help. If so, what and when would be the bet time to consume them?

Sorry for basic knowledge gaps, clearly very new to this!
JoeBotters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-17, 01:57 PM   #10
JoeBotters
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Oh and should I be looking at multi vitamins and minerals too
JoeBotters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-17, 02:18 PM   #11
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint
Posts: 18,016
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1436 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeBotters View Post
what and when would be the bet time to consume them?
after intense workouts for 1hr or more, used to take a scoop of whey protein powder & mix it vigorously in a small bottle of fruit juice. it was disgusting but delivered the protein & simple carbs which can be absorbed immediately. since my training routines have changed I don't use it anymore. I also battle gout & consume protein more carefully

Last edited by rumrunn6; 07-19-17 at 06:37 AM.
rumrunn6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-17, 04:32 PM   #12
wolfchild
Senior Member
 
wolfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes
Posts: 4,679
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 686 Post(s)
The main reason why I use protein supplements is because of convenience and cost...I follow a high protein diet and try to get at least 180-210 grams of protein per day. Why so high you may ask ??, because that's what works best for me and my lifestyle... I only eat two large cooked meals per day and that's not enough to meet my daily protein intake, so I use whey protein throughout the day... I usually use it as a smoothie and also put a scoop into a large box of yogurt which I eat everyday. I also use a mixture of whey protein mixed with Gatorade for post workout recovery or during fitness bike rides or any physical activity where eating solid food may not be ideal.


Sure you can get enough protein from food but it's just not practical for me to carry a bunch of cooked food with me everywhere I go and I am not into eating fast foo, I much prefer to cook my own food at home... so I use whey powder strictly for convenience and ease of use and because it works...I buy unflavoured/unsweetened whey powder and sweeten and flavour it myself according to my own taste.
wolfchild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-17, 05:25 PM   #13
steve-in-kville 
UltraGardener
 
steve-in-kville's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Lebanon Co., Pennsylvania
Bikes: Kilo TT Stripper
Posts: 1,501
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 245 Post(s)
I keep a keg of Hammer's protein powder around. I may have a shake just as I get to work after commuting, and that's if I'm too pressed for time to eat something. Yes, I feel it helps with recovery. If given the choice I'd rather eat two hardboiled eggs with salt, as its closer to real food.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carcosa View Post
Ride a SS/FG or get a derailleur like a normal person.
steve-in-kville is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-17, 07:44 PM   #14
Daniel4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Toronto
Bikes:
Posts: 1,302
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 320 Post(s)
I'd rather eat food: peanut butter, yogurt, eggs, cheese, etc.

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/2012/04/protein-drinks/index.htm
Daniel4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-17, 06:50 AM   #15
rubiksoval
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Music City, USA
Bikes: Felt AR
Posts: 987
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 535 Post(s)
I use protein pretty regularly after rides. When I'm really overreaching and get the heavy, sore legs, I'll take additional protein before bed and in the morning. Seems to help quite a bit.

I just use unflavored whey.
rubiksoval is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-17, 06:53 AM   #16
rubiksoval
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Music City, USA
Bikes: Felt AR
Posts: 987
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 535 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeBotters View Post
Oh and should I be looking at multi vitamins and minerals too
Maybe?

Depends on your needs and wants.

I mix spirulina, chlorella, and kelp powders daily into some juice. Also take fish oil, coq10, EGCg, and bromelain (all anti-inflammatory stuff).

For performance stuff, caffeine, beetroot powder (also excellent for blood pressure), and beta alanine are all useful in my experience (in that order).
rubiksoval is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-17, 04:16 PM   #17
fantom1 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Middle of the ocean
Bikes:
Posts: 405
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 57 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
My general theory is: if your legs hurt on the bike, you probably aren't getting enough protein. Which doesn't have to take the form of a supplement, better to be part of your regular diet.

I had a vegetarian employee who rode a hilly commute 32 miles round-trip to work 5 days/week. After a couple weeks, his legs just wouldn't do it anymore, I prescribed a protein supplement at the end of each commute ride and that fixed him right up.

Years ago I was starting to do a lot of miles, 60-100 mile rides every week plus training. My legs got to hurting and wouldn't work anymore. I'm an ovo-lacto vegetarian but still wasn't getting enough. I started using whey protein and still do.

So, in general if your legs quit working for you and, as I said, they hurt while riding, consider getting more protein. For most people, drinking a glass of milk with a little sugar stirred into it after a ride takes care of the issue.
This information is completely misleading if not outright wrong. 1) If somebody can't do 32 miles a day, that's a problem with base fitness and basic health, not protein. 2) Protein consumption has been shown at best to have an inconclusive effect on athletic performance. One group says one thing, the other says another.

In regards to the OP, if you just started a couple of weeks ago, you have a hell of a lot of work to do before even thinking a supplement may or may not make a difference. The aerobic and anaerobic fitness of your muscles is going to take thousands of miles of suffering before you are in any kind of real cycling shape.

Next:

As a cyclist you don't need much protein. Heck, as a person you don't need nearly as much protein as we've all been led to believe. Even bodybuilders trying to get yuuuggee don't need as much protein as previously assumed and maybe no more than an average person.

Even if you're a vegan you shouldn't need protein supplements to help your cycling.

The part that protein can play is in the nutrients it can help deliver, not the protein itself.

The part that vegetarians and especially vegans don't get is IRON. For some reason also I've noticed an increased need for electrolytes like NA, MG, ZN, CA, etc. as well. Between the deficiencies in these two is fatigue, sometimes extreme, but it has nothing to do with protein. Amino acids are also important, and vegans again are mostly deficient in that.

Triathletes, Tour de France riders, football players, etc. all can provide the same information. Extra or extreme amounts of protein are not necessary.

In short, forget about taking a protein supplement. Learn to know what your body is asking for, be it iron or sugars, or whatever. If you learn to do this you will pretty much never feel a need for "protein", which is significant.
fantom1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-17, 05:04 PM   #18
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
Posts: 12,861
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 800 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by fantom1 View Post
This information is completely misleading if not outright wrong. 1) If somebody can't do 32 miles a day, that's a problem with base fitness and basic health, not protein. 2) Protein consumption has been shown at best to have an inconclusive effect on athletic performance. One group says one thing, the other says another.

In regards to the OP, if you just started a couple of weeks ago, you have a hell of a lot of work to do before even thinking a supplement may or may not make a difference. The aerobic and anaerobic fitness of your muscles is going to take thousands of miles of suffering before you are in any kind of real cycling shape.

Next:

As a cyclist you don't need much protein. Heck, as a person you don't need nearly as much protein as we've all been led to believe. Even bodybuilders trying to get yuuuggee don't need as much protein as previously assumed and maybe no more than an average person.

Even if you're a vegan you shouldn't need protein supplements to help your cycling.

The part that protein can play is in the nutrients it can help deliver, not the protein itself.

The part that vegetarians and especially vegans don't get is IRON. For some reason also I've noticed an increased need for electrolytes like NA, MG, ZN, CA, etc. as well. Between the deficiencies in these two is fatigue, sometimes extreme, but it has nothing to do with protein. Amino acids are also important, and vegans again are mostly deficient in that.

Triathletes, Tour de France riders, football players, etc. all can provide the same information. Extra or extreme amounts of protein are not necessary.

In short, forget about taking a protein supplement. Learn to know what your body is asking for, be it iron or sugars, or whatever. If you learn to do this you will pretty much never feel a need for "protein", which is significant.
You're pretty funny. There are endless studies available which show that protein balance is generally achieved when protein intake is between .8g/kg/day and 1.6g/kg/day. Reality is all mathematics.

I don't know what it is about protein which arouses such animosity. I can't offhand think of another nutrient of which athletes are being told by some to only ingest the minimum amount necessary to maintain health, or even as you say, to ignore the nutrient completely. Healthy dietary levels for protein are 10%-35% of daily calories, with the lower number only for the sedentary. There is certainly no harm and much possible benefit in protein supplementation for endurance athletes. There's a reason why protein is the most sought-after nutrient among the under-nourished.

You might read:
http://www.zeitschrift-sportmedizin....ed_2016-01.pdf

BTW, amino acids are protein.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-17, 05:22 PM   #19
fantom1 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Middle of the ocean
Bikes:
Posts: 405
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 57 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
You're pretty funny.

BTW, amino acids are protein.
Mmm, sorry, wrong.

Maybe some Ochem is in order for you?

Also, the article you provided just proves exactly my point. Y u no try read?

Last edited by fantom1; 08-09-17 at 05:40 PM.
fantom1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-17, 05:32 PM   #20
Iride01
Senior Member
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Bikes: '91 Schwinn Paramount '78 Raleigh Competition GS
Posts: 879
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 361 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
You're pretty funny. There are endless studies available which show that protein balance is generally achieved when protein intake is between .8g/kg/day and 1.6g/kg/day. Reality is all mathematics.

I don't know what it is about protein which arouses such animosity. I can't offhand think of another nutrient of which athletes are being told by some to only ingest the minimum amount necessary to maintain health, or even as you say, to ignore the nutrient completely. Healthy dietary levels for protein are 10%-35% of daily calories, with the lower number only for the sedentary. There is certainly no harm and much possible benefit in protein supplementation for endurance athletes. There's a reason why protein is the most sought-after nutrient among the under-nourished.

You might read:
http://www.zeitschrift-sportmedizin....ed_2016-01.pdf

BTW, amino acids are protein.
According to the article you linked and by what you stated an elite athlete needs 1.6 grams of protein per kg of body mass per day. That means for a 180 pound person, 129.6 grams of protein. You get more than that from just a 9 to 10 oz. steak. And that doesn't include all the other protein you eat.

Also, the article when I skimmed through it seemed to say, as most of us believe, that hydration is the key for cramps with some attention to electrolytes in extreme situations, not protein.

People need to dwell on that recommendation for only 1.6 grams/kg of body mass/day of protein for "ELITE" athletes, and only half that for recreational types. Might explain some of our weight and health issues.

edit.... I think I miscalculated... a 16 ounce steak will roughly be equal to the amount of protein recomended per day for elite athletes.

Last edited by Iride01; 08-09-17 at 05:47 PM.
Iride01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-17, 05:39 PM   #21
Iride01
Senior Member
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Bikes: '91 Schwinn Paramount '78 Raleigh Competition GS
Posts: 879
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 361 Post(s)
as for the OP's original question. Protein is only needed to maintain muscle. I helps none for the ride. Unless the OP wants to bulk up and add weight to haul up a hill, it serves no purpose to supplement...... IMHO and from what I've read.

NEW CYCLING PERFORMANCE TIPS - Table of Contents
Iride01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-17, 06:30 PM   #22
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
Posts: 12,861
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 800 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
According to the article you linked and by what you stated an elite athlete needs 1.6 grams of protein per kg of body mass per day. That means for a 180 pound person, 129.6 grams of protein. You get more than that from just a 9 to 10 oz. steak. And that doesn't include all the other protein you eat.

Also, the article when I skimmed through it seemed to say, as most of us believe, that hydration is the key for cramps with some attention to electrolytes in extreme situations, not protein.

People need to dwell on that recommendation for only 1.6 grams/kg of body mass/day of protein for "ELITE" athletes, and only half that for recreational types. Might explain some of our weight and health issues.
I haven't eaten mammal or dinosaur meat in 45 years. Next?

You should look into cramping much more closely. Researchers and med-tent studies agree that neither hydration nor blood electrolyte levels vary between those cramped in the med tent and successful finishers. Much more important is physical conditioning, i.e. hard training. There's not a chemical substitute. Though of course we should all pay attention to hydration and electrolyte intake, trying to stay in balance. That's a big health and performance issue even if, as seems likely, it has nothing to do with cramping. I've done long rides in extreme conditions with limited water availability, yet the only times I've ever cramped have been after doing anaerobic hill repeats on group rides in the spring. And of course protein intake has nothing to do with cramping. Who said it did?

There are no health issues connected with eating more than the minimum amount of protein required for nitrogen balance. There are some athletes (true, a very few) who eat almost nothing except raw red meat. Kikuyu tribesmen have been know to eat as much as 18 lbs. of meat during hunting celebrations. There's also a cyclist who claims to eat almost nothing but bananas. There's lotsa bananas out there.

Obesity closely correlates with consumption of excess sugars. High protein intake in adults actually reduces the chance of obesity because protein increases satiety at a relatively small caloric cost. Low carb/high fat and protein diets are a favorite of those trying to lose weight. High protein intake during weight loss helps retain muscle mass. When I'm losing weight, a favorite tactic of mine is to have a glass of whey protein in water 30' before each meal. I eat less and stay hunger-free longer.
See: The satiating power of protein?a key to obesity prevention?
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-17, 09:08 PM   #23
SylvainG 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Ottawa,ON,Canada
Bikes: Schwinn Miranda 1990, Giant TCX 2 2012
Posts: 811
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 331 Post(s)
I commute daily 40 km and take this bar after my rides. They taste great and although they have a bit less protein by serving, there is no mixing required

Probably not just based on the protein supplement I'm taking but like you, I've recently (well a year ago) started riding again after many years of sedentary. Last year, I was climbing a hill on my commute at 13 km/h. Now I'm climbing that same hill at 27 km/h.
SylvainG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-17, 09:46 PM   #24
DPV
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: North Vancouver, BC
Bikes:
Posts: 35
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
OP; everyone here, myself included, can only tell you what works for us individually.

The key to succeeding in your plan is to experiment on what works. I'd stick with your regular diet for now until you reach enough miles that you're feeling severely drained and unable to face more time in the saddle. Then, I'd consider introducing a protein supplement. As someone else mentioned, I like Vega Sport Protein for taste, texture and the fact it contains some added ingredients that *I* find beneficial in recovery and reducing muscle inflammation, such as tart cherry, turmeric, 6g of BCAAs and probiotics. It's plant based, gluten free and non-GMO. It's also made from real ingedients- no added sugar (or sugar alcohols like most others) or artificial sweeteners/colourings

However, I always see protein as a convenient way of getting what my body needs for recovery quickly after a ride... it doesn't replace good eating decisions in my day to day. A protein shake won't get you jacked if you're just eating bags of chips and coke all day between workouts.

I also drink vega recovery accelerator as my last water bottle after a long run/bike ride. For what it's worth, I'm a competitive ultra runner who routinely runs 50km-100 mile trail races, and this approach helps me train to the volumes i need to for success.

Based on the challenge ahead of you, I think you'll find that finding something that allows you to sidestep muscle soreness and really ramp up a heavy volume of quality rides will be the difference maker. Good luck!

Last note: don't overlook the importance of post ride stretching and foam rolling!! It's absolutely key (again, my opinion...)
DPV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-17, 07:54 AM   #25
Iride01
Senior Member
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Bikes: '91 Schwinn Paramount '78 Raleigh Competition GS
Posts: 879
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 361 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
This articles point on protein is based on the premise and study of those that live a sedentary life. The OP want to do endurance rides and that is not a sedentary life. Additionally the article says that upping the protein level through certain diets might lead to ketosis. Ketosis being a depleted glycogen state an the body depending largely on fat stores for muscle energy.

Not a great thing for someone wanting to perform on their bicycle. Okay for anyone wanting to stay in the low zones, but not good for anyone that wants to finish in the top 50 percent of the pack. Definitely won't win any sprints when among the carbohydrate burner.
Iride01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:36 AM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION