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The Best Way to Avoid Back Pain? Lift Heavy Things

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The Best Way to Avoid Back Pain? Lift Heavy Things

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Old 04-13-18, 01:21 PM
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Seattle Forrest
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The Best Way to Avoid Back Pain? Lift Heavy Things

I obviously have a very strong personal interest in this topic. This is a philosophy I generally agree with too.

https://www.realclearscience.com/art...gs_110603.html

People are becoming less active and more overweight, which means they are becoming less fit and less able to tolerate the activity and loading for which we were designed. Recent expert advice highlights that the best way to prevent back pain is with exercise.


Rather than advise people to avoid lifting, they should be taught to make regular lifting part of their everyday routine. To build the muscles of the spine, the load must be heavy enough, as with any weight training.
The part about being overweight probably doesn't apply to most cyclists, but we as a group don't do enough resistance training, and many cyclists (including me lately) complain about back pain on the bike.
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Old 04-13-18, 01:35 PM
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Thanks for the informative updates. Although I could have told you that for free.
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Old 04-13-18, 03:29 PM
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The best way to prevent lower back problems is to build a strong core and abs...Sitting for hours and hours every day is what destroys a lot of peoples lower backs....But how does one convince people about the benefits of lifting ??...when most people have no desire to lift heavy. Most peoples idea of exercise is to walk on a treadmill or use some other silly cardio machine which does nothing to strengthen your back and core.
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Old 04-13-18, 06:41 PM
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I do core exercises regularly, and indeed it has helped to significantly ease my lower back pain.



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Old 04-14-18, 08:06 AM
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Interesting the article cites rowers. I used to train on a Concept 2 indoor erg regularly, like 4-5 session/week for between 60-80 minutes each session, and quite intensely. No, I'm not an elite rower, but I will say that technique is very important when you're doing what is essentially a repeated lifting motion for thousands of times per session.
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Old 04-14-18, 05:35 PM
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Lifting heavy is good but it needs to be done in moderation. Too much of a good thing can be harmful. Doing heavy compound lifts all the time for many years is almost guaranteed to mess up your joints as you get older. There are a lot of bodybuilders, weightlifters and power lifters who end up having knee surgeries, hip replacement and shoulder surgeries from years of heavy lifting...Mobility, heart health and healthy movement patterns are more important than putting more plates on the bar...To be honest, I feel a lot better, I recover faster have more energy, I am more athletic, have better mobility and flexibility and I am more functional since I stopped all heavy barbell lifts. For the last few months I've been working out only with kettlebells, steel maces, clubbells and bodyweight exercises. I've had great results from it and I am going to stick with what works best for me.
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Old 04-14-18, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
Lifting heavy is good but it needs to be done in moderation. Too much of a good thing can be harmful. Doing heavy compound lifts all the time for many years is almost guaranteed to mess up your joints as you get older.
I think you have to define what 'heavy' is. Sure, a life time of heavy lifting the way professional athletes like bodybuilders and power lifters do can result in problems, but that goes for other pro athletes. Injuries happen when you are always at the limit of your physical capabilities. But for the average Joe who just wants to get stronger, build some muscle, and lose fat, lifting heavy should be part of the regular exercise regimen, and it's not even close to a guarantee of joint problems in later life...but I do understand that you have a penchant for hyperbole, so your guarantee might be like 5%.

Personally, I am lifting more for maintenance, so I am doing mostly 8-10 rep range, perhaps 70-80% 1RM. I do regularly go heavier into the 80-90% range (3-5 rep range).
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Old 04-14-18, 09:46 PM
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Plus 80% is heavy. And its not generally the weight that is the issue, rather, the poor form at that level that does all the harm.
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Old 04-15-18, 07:27 AM
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Originally Posted by mcours2006 View Post
I think you have to define what 'heavy' is.

I'll give you an example: a 160 pound barbell back squat is nothing and feels light...but doing a front squat with a double 80 pound kettlebells feels very heavy. It's he same total weight but one will feel light and easy and the other one will feel heavy. A lot of people can easily squat 160 pound barbell but not too many can do double kettlebell squat. The centre of gravity and the leverage of kettlebells makes it feel very heavy and difficult to do and requires very strong core, abs and upper back to stabilize two ketlebells while squatting... Heavy means a lot more than just numbers and percentages of your 1 rep max.
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Old 04-15-18, 07:30 AM
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Originally Posted by KraneXL View Post
Plus 80% is heavy. And its not generally the weight that is the issue, rather, the poor form at that level that does all the harm.

If your form breaks down because of too much weight that it means that weight is an issue.
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Old 04-15-18, 07:34 AM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
I'll give you an example: a 160 pound barbell back squat is nothing and feels light...but doing a front squat with a double 80 pound kettlebells feels very heavy. It's he same total weight but one will feel light and easy and the other one will feel heavy. A lot of people can easily squat 160 pound barbell but not too many can do double kettlebell squat. The centre of gravity and the leverage of kettlebells makes it feel very heavy and difficult to do and requires very strong core, abs and upper back to stabilize two ketlebells while squatting... Heavy means a lot more than just numbers and percentages of your 1 rep max.
Yes, but you used the example of bodybuilders and powerlifters, and not many of these guys would be doing 80lb kettlebells.
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Old 04-15-18, 09:42 AM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
I'll give you an example: a 160 pound barbell back squat is nothing and feels light...but doing a front squat with a double 80 pound kettlebells feels very heavy. It's he same total weight but one will feel light and easy and the other one will feel heavy. A lot of people can easily squat 160 pound barbell but not too many can do double kettlebell squat. The centre of gravity and the leverage of kettlebells makes it feel very heavy and difficult to do and requires very strong core, abs and upper back to stabilize two ketlebells while squatting... Heavy means a lot more than just numbers and percentages of your 1 rep max.
Maybe? But you can't debate subjective terminology. We all need to agree on a standard before we can make any useful progress.
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Old 04-15-18, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
A lot of people can easily squat 160 pound barbell but not too many can do double kettlebell squat. The centre of gravity and the leverage of kettlebells makes it feel very heavy and difficult to do and requires very strong core, abs and upper back to stabilize two ketlebells while squatting... Heavy means a lot more than just numbers and percentages of your 1 rep max.
Completely different exercises. 'Heavy' is a different number for each individual and each exercise but is consistent for each individual and his exercises.
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Old 04-16-18, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
Lifting heavy is good but it needs to be done in moderation. Too much of a good thing can be harmful. Doing heavy compound lifts all the time for many years is almost guaranteed to mess up your joints as you get older. There are a lot of bodybuilders, weightlifters and power lifters who end up having knee surgeries, hip replacement and shoulder surgeries from years of heavy lifting...Mobility, heart health and healthy movement patterns are more important than putting more plates on the bar...To be honest, I feel a lot better, I recover faster have more energy, I am more athletic, have better mobility and flexibility and I am more functional since I stopped all heavy barbell lifts. For the last few months I've been working out only with kettlebells, steel maces, clubbells and bodyweight exercises. I've had great results from it and I am going to stick with what works best for me.
As mcours2006 said, I think it's very important to distinguish between athletes whose goal is to lift as much as they possibly can, pushing their physical limits to the maximum year after year, and the general population who is just training for health.
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