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Portable, "Healthiest" Foods for Glycogen Fuel-up

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Portable, "Healthiest" Foods for Glycogen Fuel-up

Old 04-01-21, 08:18 AM
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I love fig newtons and took them on my first century. Pre-portioned and I can shove the whole thing in my mouth. The downside is the fig newtons started to disintegrate in my jersey pocket after awhile.
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Old 04-01-21, 04:28 PM
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Originally Posted by elcruxio
You need to realize that up until that trainerroad article (which wasn't posted by you btw), you really seemed like someone who struggles with energy units. If you go out and mention that 1 kcal roughly equals 1kJ with no context then what do you actually expect to happen?
After that trainerroad article which explained the context the whole thing is obvious. If only you had had the foresight to somehow in even a small manner clarify the context in which you state that 1 kcal = 1kJ and you would have had much easier time of it.

You might want to consider how you contribute towards the discussion. These two replies of yours are really nothing but low class dirt and they're not helplful to Op or anyone else in this thread. You kinda seem like the pidgeon on a chess board (if the context of that is unfamiliar, I'm more than happy to explain it to you)
Also that last reply is just one big strawman.


You need to read more and reply less.
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Old 04-06-21, 10:03 PM
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IMO once you've tried Fig Newmans, Fig Newtons don't seem that great anymore. We always a a stack of Fig Newmans somewhere on the tandem.
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Old 04-07-21, 12:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy
Maybe the issue is that you don't ride with a power meter, upload your rides to a training diary and then examine your power output. Even if you don't have a power meter, if you use an uploadable GPS device like a Garmin, you can upload to Strava for instance, and it will calculate your estimated average power output and give you a total in kJ.

If you had been doing that, like everyone else discussing power output here, you'd know that 500kJ output is about an hour at 140w, which would get me about 19 miles down a flat road - and would be the result of burning about 500 calories. There's a very good explanation of kJ and Calories (kcal) here: https://www.trainerroad.com/blog/calories-and-power/ Which I think has already been posted, but you obviously didn't read it. Try reading it now.
Thank you for sharing that! I didn't know about the differences and (in) efficiencies before

I guess stravas calories consumed metric is actually quite accurate if you're riding with a power Meter
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Old 04-07-21, 08:08 PM
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For me, Strava's estimates were not really accurate. Estimated power was much lower than reality and the estimated calories were always far too high.

At least a power meter gave me some way to compare my outdoor rides to my indoor rides.
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Old 04-09-21, 11:12 AM
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Originally Posted by guachi
For me, Strava's estimates were not really accurate. Estimated power was much lower than reality and the estimated calories were always far too high.

At least a power meter gave me some way to compare my outdoor rides to my indoor rides.
I think the no-meter accuracy depends on the terrain, wind, and the user's inputs. There's an event ride I do every year, same equipment, ~9000', ~154 miles. Looking at two rides with identical moving times, one with PM, one without:
With PM: average power 126w, 4,189 kJ
Without PM: average power 131w, 4,866 kJ

Difference could have been wind or drafting variations, but it's probably safe to assume that the no-PM numbers are just higher. It's probably possible to adjust the calculated numbers to be the same as the PM numbers by altering the inputs slightly, i.e. dropping my total weight by 4%.

In my case, the calculated Strava numbers before I got the PM were plenty close enough for estimating fueling requirements.
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Old 04-09-21, 08:54 PM
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Originally Posted by elcruxio

It would also mean that the 4k world record was achieved with the energy of a third of a banana.
probably about right since the effort took less than 4 1/2 minutes im guessing
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Old 04-14-21, 11:15 AM
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Feedzone Portables..

If you want real food, spend the money and buy a copy of Feedzone Portables book. Mini-pies, baked rice cakes, mini-waffles, mini-pancakes, rice balls, pizza rolls, LOTS of options.

I've been trending to the Rice Cakes. Date Almond, BBQ chicken, Lemon Ricotta, Sweet Potato & Bacon are all on the "make these again" list as are pizza rolls. Mini-pies are hard because they have a crust that's a bit fragile for jersey pockets, but they are delicious.

For a 5 hour ride I bring three or four portables and the same number of gels because at a certain point eating solid food becomes a chore, but we still need food. my fall back is SiS or Gu-Roctane for the end of a ride.

For tracking WHEN to eat I use the Garmin Smart Eat function if for no other reason than as a reminder to keep fueling and it keeps a running total so you can see if you are falling behind.

Last edited by SCTinkering; 04-14-21 at 11:16 AM. Reason: added smart eat.
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Old 03-26-22, 06:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Cyclist0100
You're on the right path.

I recently went through a period of struggling to figure out what fuel and nutrition protocol worked best for me. Much of the advice I received led to over-eating on the bike. Through experimentation I found that eating something substantial and healthy about 2 hours before a ride and simply topping off as needed during the ride works best for me. Depending on the length of my daily route I'll usually have 1-2 servings of hot oats with cinnamon, banana, pecans or walnuts, ~1 tbsp raw agave nectar and salt to taste.

The other thing I learned through my own experiementation is that electrolytes are much more important than food on the bike. To my 750ml bottles of water I add 1/2 tsp. magnesium citrate, 1/8 tsp. potassium chloride and 1/8 tsp. himalayan pink salt. Increasing my intake of electrolytes on the bike has provided more benefit than anything else I have tried.

Example: For a 100-mile ride (which I do often) I will front-load with 2 servings of hot oats, banana, nuts, cinnamon, salt and raw agave nectar. That pre-ride meal provides about 700 calories, ~100g of carbs, 700-800mg potassium, a little protein, a modest amount of fat, and a bit of fiber. In cooler weather (sub 70 degrees) I've been consuming two 750ml bottles with water and electrolytes. If temps are above 80 I'll usually consume one or two 750ml bottles of straight water in addition to the two bottles with electrolytes. On average, that's roughly 750ml of fluids every 25-50 miles depending on heat. As for on-the-bike food I usually consume one Cliff bar (or some dates and a banana) around mile 50.

For me and my style of riding I have found this fueling and hydration protocol quite ideal. The recommendations to pump my body full of carbs at a rate of 30-60g per hour led to poor results... especially maltodextrin.

A note about maltodextrin: Many on this forum espouse the wonderful benefits of maltodextrin. And if it works for you then I say that's great. For me,however, it was terrible in all respects. When I first mixed maltodextrin powder with water I suddenly realized what that aweful smell is that's so prevalent in Wal-Mart and Target stores. That weird, funky, plastic-y smell that drives me nuts whenever I have to enter a Wal-Mart or a Target is exactly what maltodextrin smells like. And people put that crap into their body?! Absolutely gross! Just my opinion.
I strongly appreciate your sharings. Especially electrolyte intake. It is most necessary while on a ride
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Old 03-26-22, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Nozipho
I strongly appreciate your sharings. Especially electrolyte intake. It is most necessary while on a ride
Not if you are just going out for a 90 minute or so ride.
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Old 03-26-22, 10:46 PM
  #61  
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Potatoes. I already knew the typical potatoes used to make french fries in fast food joints was high on the glycemic index. But a GCN video about a year ago (IIRC, Hank and Conor doing a long ride, with Hank refueling normally while Conor fasted) showed chips (their fries) spiked Conor's blood sugar quickly. They did blood sugar tests along the route. So if you want to try something other than sugary stuff, try some fries from McDonald's or whatever's handy.
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Old 03-30-22, 07:10 AM
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Originally Posted by rubiksoval
That's the highest glycemic sugar available. Probably not that healthy for someone concerned with it.
But you are exercising. You want fast sugars.
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