Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Training & Nutrition
Reload this Page >

Can sugar as energy boost help you improve your personal best?

Notices
Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

Can sugar as energy boost help you improve your personal best?

Old 09-01-23, 10:07 AM
  #26  
Senior Member
 
MinnMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 5,626

Bikes: 2022 Salsa Beargrease Carbon Deore 11, 2020 Salsa Warbird GRX 600, 2020 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX disc 9.0 Di2, 2020 Catrike Eola, 2016 Masi cxgr, 2011, Felt F3 Ltd, 2010 Trek 2.1, 2009 KHS Flite 220

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3844 Post(s)
Liked 2,781 Times in 1,696 Posts
Originally Posted by MoAlpha
You can ride "forever" without fueling. It's just slow and you burn muscle.
Of course, but the assertion is also that with the magic of keto, you feel good doing it.
MinnMan is offline  
Old 09-01-23, 10:26 AM
  #27  
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Land of Pleasant Living
Posts: 11,574

Bikes: Shmikes

Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9599 Post(s)
Liked 5,397 Times in 2,890 Posts
Originally Posted by MinnMan
Of course, but the assertion is also that with the magic of keto, you feel good doing it.
De gustibus non est disputandum.
MoAlpha is offline  
Old 09-01-23, 09:14 PM
  #28  
don't try this at home.
 
rm -rf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: N. KY
Posts: 5,778
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 907 Post(s)
Liked 367 Times in 268 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01
I can tell the difference in whether I'm drinking water or drinking a mix with carbohydrates. If you are riding at a hard HR zone 4 and 5 pace for a while, then when you take that gulp or two of mix, you'll feel the energy coming back within 60 to 90 seconds. And back when I was using fructose/sucrose carbs, the surge in energy didn't last as long. With the maltodextrin that I use now, it seems to be a more steady release of energy that I feel longer between gulps from the bottle. Somewhat seems reasonable as fructose and sucrose are simple sugars where as maltodextrin is considered a complex carb.

If you are only a HR zone 2 and 3 rider, then you may not ever get enough energy deficit to notice.
Some years ago, I was surprised to find that maltodextrin has a higher glycemic index. It spikes blood sugar faster than table sugar. I assumed it would be a slow release alternative. No.
...this site says it's 95 vs 100 for table sugar. 95 for a baguette or baked potato too!
rm -rf is offline  
Old 09-02-23, 06:41 AM
  #29  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Prince Edward Island, Canada
Posts: 311

Bikes: '23 Devinci Hatchet Carbon Apex1 '19 Norco Bigfoot 6.1 ,'12 Motobecane Turino (killed by dog crash), '12 Trek 3700 Disc

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 148 Post(s)
Liked 127 Times in 73 Posts
Originally Posted by MoAlpha
You can ride "forever" without fueling. It's just slow and you burn muscle.
Not sure where you got that "information" from, but it is not correct. It might be for someone not fat-adapted? As long as protein intake is high and the muscles are being used there is no loss of muscle. In fact the opposite is true in my case.

Sure seems to work for Shawn Baker...
Bearhawker is offline  
Old 09-02-23, 09:48 AM
  #30  
I'm good to go!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 14,152

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5839 Post(s)
Liked 4,458 Times in 3,074 Posts
Originally Posted by rm -rf
Some years ago, I was surprised to find that maltodextrin has a higher glycemic index. It spikes blood sugar faster than table sugar. I assumed it would be a slow release alternative. No.
...this site says it's 95 vs 100 for table sugar. 95 for a baguette or baked potato too!
I've seen some list maltodextrin at over 130 glycemic index. Whether it gets to be energy any quicker than any of the other common sugars in sports drinks or juices I don't know. Especially in light of MoAlpha 's statement that the body has a reflexive (?) action to perceiving new supplies of carbohydrate soon after it's consumed and will start going deeper into the energy stores knowing it has the supply to replenish it. It does seem to me that maltodextrin gives me a energy surge that lasts longer between the 10 - 12 minutes I might go between gulps.

I'm not too concerned about the sugar I consume for cycling as I expend more energy for the ride than I take in with carbohydrates. And when off the bike, except for the carbs in my recovery drink, every thing else I drink is unsweetened and I'm fairly sugar free my normal diet. Except for the sweet tooth I have for occasional desserts and the chocolate that my wife insists on keeping around. <grin>

Last edited by Iride01; 09-02-23 at 09:52 AM.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 09-02-23, 08:27 PM
  #31  
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 19,320

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 114 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3783 Post(s)
Liked 1,811 Times in 1,305 Posts
Originally Posted by Bearhawker
Not sure where you got that "information" from, but it is not correct. It might be for someone not fat-adapted? As long as protein intake is high and the muscles are being used there is no loss of muscle. In fact the opposite is true in my case.

Sure seems to work for Shawn Baker...
My guess is that neither you nor Mr. Baker have ridden "forever." And that you've never seen photos of the folks who survived the death marches of '45. "Fueling" includes all nutrients and gluconeogenesis is a real thing.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Likes For Carbonfiberboy:
Old 09-02-23, 08:36 PM
  #32  
Senior Member
 
MinnMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 5,626

Bikes: 2022 Salsa Beargrease Carbon Deore 11, 2020 Salsa Warbird GRX 600, 2020 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX disc 9.0 Di2, 2020 Catrike Eola, 2016 Masi cxgr, 2011, Felt F3 Ltd, 2010 Trek 2.1, 2009 KHS Flite 220

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3844 Post(s)
Liked 2,781 Times in 1,696 Posts
Originally Posted by Bearhawker
Not sure where you got that "information" from, but it is not correct. It might be for someone not fat-adapted? As long as protein intake is high and the muscles are being used there is no loss of muscle. In fact the opposite is true in my case.

Sure seems to work for Shawn Baker...
You do know that you are debating an M.D.?
MinnMan is offline  
Old 09-02-23, 08:46 PM
  #33  
Senior Member
 
MinnMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 5,626

Bikes: 2022 Salsa Beargrease Carbon Deore 11, 2020 Salsa Warbird GRX 600, 2020 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX disc 9.0 Di2, 2020 Catrike Eola, 2016 Masi cxgr, 2011, Felt F3 Ltd, 2010 Trek 2.1, 2009 KHS Flite 220

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3844 Post(s)
Liked 2,781 Times in 1,696 Posts
Originally Posted by rm -rf
Some years ago, I was surprised to find that maltodextrin has a higher glycemic index. It spikes blood sugar faster than table sugar. I assumed it would be a slow release alternative. No.
...this site says it's 95 vs 100 for table sugar. 95 for a baguette or baked potato too!
'

Not sure I believe that site. It says that boiled celery has a higher GI (85) than white rice (70).
MinnMan is offline  
Old 09-03-23, 02:57 AM
  #34  
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Land of Pleasant Living
Posts: 11,574

Bikes: Shmikes

Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9599 Post(s)
Liked 5,397 Times in 2,890 Posts
Originally Posted by MinnMan
You do know that you are debating an M.D.?
Meh, so is the carnivore diet hack they cite. It's the internet; I could be a dog.
MoAlpha is offline  
Old 09-03-23, 06:47 AM
  #35  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 4,083
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2332 Post(s)
Liked 2,091 Times in 1,310 Posts
I was full keto for 18 months and never lost muscle. (Keto is a PITA to maintain and nearly impossible when touring, so, I fell off the wagon permanently)

Here is a relevant study or three

https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...26049515003340

As previously mentioned, there is growing evidence suggesting a KD is able to increase mitochondrial biogenesis and activity within skeletal muscle, resulting in greater muscle function with age
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9762714/


Some scholars and researchers question whether a KD may contribute to weight loss, which may induce decreased muscle volume. However, in a randomized control trial, gymnasts consuming a one-month KD while receiving the same training did not lose muscle; instead, they experienced a non-significant increase of muscle mass (pre, 37.6 kg 3.9 vs. post, 37.9 kg 4.5, n = 4). Meanwhile, their average weight and fat mass significantly decreased. Furthermore, exercise performance was not influenced.
​​​​​​​https://www.mdpi.com/2075-4663/7/2/40

Last edited by GhostRider62; 09-03-23 at 06:54 AM.
GhostRider62 is offline  
Old 09-03-23, 07:03 AM
  #36  
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Land of Pleasant Living
Posts: 11,574

Bikes: Shmikes

Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9599 Post(s)
Liked 5,397 Times in 2,890 Posts
Originally Posted by GhostRider62
I was full keto for 18 months and never lost muscle. (Keto is a PITA to maintain and nearly impossible when touring, so, I fell off the wagon permanently)

Here is a relevant study

https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...26049515003340



https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9762714/
My only point was that gluconeogenesis is largely dependent on amino acids, which come from muscle. Of course, if one is assiduous about resistance training and diet, NET muscle loss can be avoided. It also helps to be young and male.
MoAlpha is offline  
Old 09-03-23, 07:44 AM
  #37  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 740
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 389 Post(s)
Liked 387 Times in 207 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy
My guess is that neither you nor Mr. Baker have ridden "forever." And that you've never seen photos of the folks who survived the death marches of '45. "Fueling" includes all nutrients and gluconeogenesis is a real thing.
Most cyclists don't ride "forever" either. IMHO there is a huge difference between an elite athlete in his 30th hour consuming electrolytes and sugar to keep from dying and your average cyclist who is 20 lbs. overweight but thinks he needs 2 snickers bars to ride 2 hours to get a coffee and doughnut.
RH Clark is offline  
Old 09-03-23, 11:00 AM
  #38  
I'm good to go!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 14,152

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5839 Post(s)
Liked 4,458 Times in 3,074 Posts
It's not a matter of how whether you ride forever or just a short ride. It's how hard you ride. Someone that rides a more leisurely pace can go for a long time and not need any additional supplementation because the body will get enough energy from fat. But if someone is riding at a high level of exertion, then even that 20 lb. overweight rider might want some supplementation to maintain that high level of exertion they desire. Carbohydrates will be absorbed and converted to energy much quicker than fat.
Iride01 is offline  
Likes For Iride01:
Old 09-04-23, 08:34 AM
  #39  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 740
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 389 Post(s)
Liked 387 Times in 207 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01
It's not a matter of how whether you ride forever or just a short ride. It's how hard you ride. Someone that rides a more leisurely pace can go for a long time and not need any additional supplementation because the body will get enough energy from fat. But if someone is riding at a high level of exertion, then even that 20 lb. overweight rider might want some supplementation to maintain that high level of exertion they desire. Carbohydrates will be absorbed and converted to energy much quicker than fat.
Anyone 20 lbs. overweight would be better off not refueling and burning the fat, if the object is to train to be better.
RH Clark is offline  
Old 09-04-23, 08:51 AM
  #40  
I'm good to go!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 14,152

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5839 Post(s)
Liked 4,458 Times in 3,074 Posts
Originally Posted by RH Clark
Anyone 20 lbs. overweight would be better off not refueling and burning the fat, if the object is to train to be better.
Depends on what the other immediate goals are. But this is sort of like you are saying that a person can't use any carbohydrates if you've deemed them overweight. But it's okay to use carbohydrates if you consider them as not over weight. And evidently 19 pounds is okay. But 20 or more is not?
Iride01 is offline  
Old 09-04-23, 10:25 AM
  #41  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 740
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 389 Post(s)
Liked 387 Times in 207 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01
Depends on what the other immediate goals are. But this is sort of like you are saying that a person can't use any carbohydrates if you've deemed them overweight. But it's okay to use carbohydrates if you consider them as not over weight. And evidently 19 pounds is okay. But 20 or more is not?
No, I'm not against carbs except that my advice is to avoid them if wanting to lose weight. I also think more junk calories are consumed by most carb eaters than is healthy.

If you want to eat sugar or candy bars or whatever I don't mind as long as you aren't pretending they are healthy and that all those preservatives, and artificial everything does no harm at all.

I'm not saying or deeming anyone anything. That's for everyone to judge for themselves, but I think you are kidding yourself if you are overweight but think you are helping yourself by eating junk carbs. I'm not against carbs. I've lost weight on very low carbs and on very high carbs and low fat. I wasn't eating junk food carbs though and pretending that it was Ok because I cycled really hard.
RH Clark is offline  
Old 09-04-23, 10:54 AM
  #42  
I'm good to go!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 14,152

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5839 Post(s)
Liked 4,458 Times in 3,074 Posts
Originally Posted by RH Clark
No, I'm not against carbs except that my advice is to avoid them if wanting to lose weight. I also think more junk calories are consumed by most carb eaters than is healthy.

If you want to eat sugar or candy bars or whatever I don't mind as long as you aren't pretending they are healthy and that all those preservatives, and artificial everything does no harm at all.

I'm not saying or deeming anyone anything. That's for everyone to judge for themselves, but I think you are kidding yourself if you are overweight but think you are helping yourself by eating junk carbs. I'm not against carbs. I've lost weight on very low carbs and on very high carbs and low fat. I wasn't eating junk food carbs though and pretending that it was Ok because I cycled really hard.
Then you are missing the point of this thread topic. It's not about general diet. It's not about whether one is overweight or not. It's not even really about training.

The stuff that gets consumed on the bike is not a large part of any diet. And in the case of carbohydrates used during the ride, they will mostly be used up during the ride.
Iride01 is offline  
Likes For Iride01:
Old 09-04-23, 11:48 AM
  #43  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 740
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 389 Post(s)
Liked 387 Times in 207 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01
Then you are missing the point of this thread topic. It's not about general diet. It's not about whether one is overweight or not. It's not even really about training.

The stuff that gets consumed on the bike is not a large part of any diet. And in the case of carbohydrates used during the ride, they will mostly be used up during the ride.
Ok we can stay on that part of the topic. Please allow me to humbly suggest health-conscious cyclists try to consume whole food carbs rather than processed junk. On that note. I hope ya'll have a good ride, and stay healthy.
RH Clark is offline  
Old 09-05-23, 07:39 AM
  #44  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 6,967
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3563 Post(s)
Liked 3,841 Times in 2,432 Posts
Originally Posted by RH Clark
Ok we can stay on that part of the topic. Please allow me to humbly suggest health-conscious cyclists try to consume whole food carbs rather than processed junk. On that note. I hope ya'll have a good ride, and stay healthy.
Theres a big difference between consuming carbs on the bike vs off the bike, which you appear to have largely ignored.

For those who ride long and hard, it is actually physically impossible to consume too many carbs during a ride. Its not like sitting on the sofa chugging cola, chocolate bars and sweets. Consuming enough carbs (especially solid food) when riding at tempo or above is hard work. Im not talking about elite pro athletes either (who typically consume about double the carbs I can stomach at pace). Just regular fit guys riding fairly hard with a performance mentality.

Sure if you ride slower then you dont need carbs to partially restore your glycogen. If Im doing a steady long ride I might just take water and maybe one bar if I feel hungry half way. But if Im riding hard for more than 90 mins then I will be aiming to take on 50g+ of carbs per hour. Basically as much as I can tolerate.
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 09-05-23, 02:38 PM
  #45  
Senior Member
 
MinnMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 5,626

Bikes: 2022 Salsa Beargrease Carbon Deore 11, 2020 Salsa Warbird GRX 600, 2020 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX disc 9.0 Di2, 2020 Catrike Eola, 2016 Masi cxgr, 2011, Felt F3 Ltd, 2010 Trek 2.1, 2009 KHS Flite 220

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3844 Post(s)
Liked 2,781 Times in 1,696 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski
There’s a big difference between consuming carbs on the bike vs off the bike, which you appear to have largely ignored.

For those who ride long and hard, it is actually physically impossible to consume too many carbs during a ride. It’s not like sitting on the sofa chugging cola, chocolate bars and sweets. Consuming enough carbs (especially solid food) when riding at tempo or above is hard work. I’m not talking about elite pro athletes either (who typically consume about double the carbs I can stomach at pace). Just regular fit guys riding fairly hard with a performance mentality.

Sure if you ride slower then you don’t need carbs to partially restore your glycogen. If I’m doing a steady long ride I might just take water and maybe one bar if I feel hungry half way. But if I’m riding hard for more than 90 mins then I will be aiming to take on 50g+ of carbs per hour. Basically as much as I can tolerate.
I've read things like this many times and I have to say that I don't understand. When on a long ride, I get my onboard fuel from a combination between gels and energy chews. The gels are kind of disgusting, but the chews are quite nice tasting. Ignoring the gels, I will normally have half a package of chews (Probar Bolt, 23 g carbs/package) every 5 miles, so that's about 50g/hour. The thing is, I'm pretty sure I *COULD* eat more, if I wanted to. That is, I haven't encountered any situation in which I felt some physical limit to my consumption. Maybe I just naturally self-regulate so that I don't hit that threshold.
MinnMan is offline  
Old 09-05-23, 03:02 PM
  #46  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 4,083
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2332 Post(s)
Liked 2,091 Times in 1,310 Posts
Originally Posted by MinnMan
I've read things like this many times and I have to say that I don't understand. When on a long ride, I get my onboard fuel from a combination between gels and energy chews. The gels are kind of disgusting, but the chews are quite nice tasting. Ignoring the gels, I will normally have half a package of chews (Probar Bolt, 23 g carbs/package) every 5 miles, so that's about 50g/hour. The thing is, I'm pretty sure I *COULD* eat more, if I wanted to. That is, I haven't encountered any situation in which I felt some physical limit to my consumption. Maybe I just naturally self-regulate so that I don't hit that threshold.
What percentage of your functional threshold power and for how long?

I suspect you have no clue.

You did say you consume 11.5 gm every 5 miles, so that is 50g/hr. 22 mph is pretty stout. Most would require 800 calories per hour or more for that speed. Refueling less than 75% of that on a long ride says something.
GhostRider62 is offline  
Old 09-05-23, 03:22 PM
  #47  
Senior Member
 
MinnMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 5,626

Bikes: 2022 Salsa Beargrease Carbon Deore 11, 2020 Salsa Warbird GRX 600, 2020 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX disc 9.0 Di2, 2020 Catrike Eola, 2016 Masi cxgr, 2011, Felt F3 Ltd, 2010 Trek 2.1, 2009 KHS Flite 220

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3844 Post(s)
Liked 2,781 Times in 1,696 Posts
Originally Posted by GhostRider62
What percentage of your functional threshold power and for how long?

I suspect you have no clue.

You did say you consume 11.5 gm every 5 miles, so that is 50g/hr. 22 mph is pretty stout. Most would require 800 calories per hour or more for that speed. Refueling less than 75% of that on a long ride says something.
My point, which you seem to have missed, is that I have never been on the bike thinking, "there's no way I could tolerate another energy chew right now. " So when I see people writing that there is a maximum amount of carbs they can consume/hour on the bike, I am puzzled.

Instead, you seem to want to pin me down to numbers which I was throwing around quite casually. I was rounding my carb consumption - I don't follow a precisely prescribed formula.

As to your other comments and challenges, you are right that I don't know well the % of FTP on my rides.
Average moving speed on a typical long Saturday ride (say 80-100 miles) will be between 18-21 mph. My fastest century in a group ride this year was 22.8 mph, but I've done faster. Fastest solo century in recent years (in 2020, I think) was 20.4 mph. Maybe I ate more on these.
MinnMan is offline  
Old 09-05-23, 03:57 PM
  #48  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 740
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 389 Post(s)
Liked 387 Times in 207 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski
Theres a big difference between consuming carbs on the bike vs off the bike, which you appear to have largely ignored.

For those who ride long and hard, it is actually physically impossible to consume too many carbs during a ride. Its not like sitting on the sofa chugging cola, chocolate bars and sweets. Consuming enough carbs (especially solid food) when riding at tempo or above is hard work. Im not talking about elite pro athletes either (who typically consume about double the carbs I can stomach at pace). Just regular fit guys riding fairly hard with a performance mentality.

Sure if you ride slower then you dont need carbs to partially restore your glycogen. If Im doing a steady long ride I might just take water and maybe one bar if I feel hungry half way. But if Im riding hard for more than 90 mins then I will be aiming to take on 50g+ of carbs per hour. Basically as much as I can tolerate.
I simply don't think you should need that many carbs to exert yourself a couple hours and I think you would be healthier long term without the carbs, but it's Ok if you don't agree. We don't have to convince each other and that never happens anyway.
RH Clark is offline  
Old 09-05-23, 05:52 PM
  #49  
Senior Member
 
Trakhak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 4,710
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2047 Post(s)
Liked 2,365 Times in 1,347 Posts
Originally Posted by RH Clark
I simply don't think you should need that many carbs to exert yourself a couple hours and I think you would be healthier long term without the carbs, but it's Ok if you don't agree. We don't have to convince each other and that never happens anyway.
For a couple of hours, you're right, of course. For significantly longer rides at a sufficiently high average effort level, the nutritional requirements change. The on-bike fueling approach that seems to have been adopted by many pro teams includes consuming about 100 grams of carbs per hour.

And the side topic of junk carbs reminds me of a story from an early edition of the Coors Classic stage race. The race director (Mike Neel? Can't remember), who was in a follow car with a journalist from Bicycling! magazine, or maybe Winning, saw Greg Lemond, who was off the back, take a bottle of Coke from a spectator.

"Oh, wow!," said the race director. "He's gonna have a bad sugar crash from that Coke."

After the race, the journalist interviewed Lemond and mentioned what the race director had said. Lemond, angered, said, "He doesn't know what he's talking about. I'd missed a food hand-up and was bonking. There's no way I would have finished the stage without that Coke."
Trakhak is online now  
Old 09-05-23, 06:55 PM
  #50  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 4,083
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2332 Post(s)
Liked 2,091 Times in 1,310 Posts
Originally Posted by MinnMan
My point, which you seem to have missed, is that I have never been on the bike thinking, "there's no way I could tolerate another energy chew right now. " So when I see people writing that there is a maximum amount of carbs they can consume/hour on the bike, I am puzzled.

Instead, you seem to want to pin me down to numbers which I was throwing around quite casually. I was rounding my carb consumption - I don't follow a precisely prescribed formula.

As to your other comments and challenges, you are right that I don't know well the % of FTP on my rides.
Average moving speed on a typical long Saturday ride (say 80-100 miles) will be between 18-21 mph. My fastest century in a group ride this year was 22.8 mph, but I've done faster. Fastest solo century in recent years (in 2020, I think) was 20.4 mph. Maybe I ate more on these.
GI intolerance. Tummy problems. Not uncommon on long rides
GhostRider62 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.