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Heart rate monitor help (long)

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Heart rate monitor help (long)

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Old 11-02-05, 01:03 PM
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karlfitt
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Heart rate monitor help (long)

OK, so I purchase a heart reate monitor, now I need to learn ho to use the thing.

I have read (twice) the 2X20 anarobic threashold test, Now I will get into my story and questions...


I Joined a health club this winter because I don't want to just "maintain" like I did last winter, I want to continue to loose weight and keep my fitness up. I paid extra for a personal trainer and a "fitness profile"
During the fitness profile test, the have you ride a stationary bike while they vary the restance and monitor your heart rate. The problem is, the make you pedal at a cadence of 50 RPM.
After this test, it was determined that my max heart rate during exercise should be 140. Neither the trainer or I believed that number, since i do ride a bike now. So it was suggested that I use a heart rate monitor in the next spin class i take and see what that says.
So yesterday I wore my new heart rate monitor in class. I used a chart they provided me at the club to see my "zones".
Now this is the second ever spin class I have been in, and i did not work as hard this time as i did before the heart rate monitor (percieved exertion level).
I spend a lot of the class at 85%. On the last interval I got up to 88%. I never panted (which I do sometimes climbing outside) and I never felt my legs burning (no lactic acid build up).

Soooooo,
If I do this test, it will reveal my anarobic threashold. But the article mentions an 80% number. I thought anarobic was 90%??
During the test, If you felt you weren't working at max, could you increase your heart rate? or do you need to be at one heart rate the whole 20 Mins?

I mean, If I am at 160 BPM for 10 minutes, and I feel I will have too much left after the 20, shouldn't I push a little harder?
The way I read this test, you should be done after the 40 minutes. I.E. that is the absolute hardest I can push for 40 minutes..
Or do I read the 2X20 test wrong.

TIA,
Karl
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Old 11-04-05, 11:03 AM
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Firstly, it all depends on your goals regarding which HR zones in which to train. Secondly, you really need to get a handle on your actual max-HR before you can even set these zones. The best method Iíve found in determining your max-HR is to simply use the highest number youíve ever recorded on your HRM. Short of that, choose a day when you are well rested. Warm up well, and push yourself (up a slight incline works best) for several minutes until you are near puking, and then get out of the saddle, and sprint until you can go no more. That number should be very close to your MHR. After youíve gotten a good handle on your MHR, you can set your zones, and train according to your goals.

Your AT changes, as it is dependent upon your fitness level. It can really be anywhere between approximately 80-93% of your max, again depending upon your level of fitness. Obviously, the higher the number (relative to max-HR) the better in terms of performance. Elite, trained athletes are @ the top of the chart in the 90-93% range. A good field test of your LT is to do a 30-minute TT. Do this TT on a relatively flat course. Record your average HR over the last 20 minutes of the TT. This will be close to your LTHR.

Good luck!
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Old 11-04-05, 01:23 PM
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What bac says is useful advice, but bear in mind that all this amateur sports physiology is handwaving and authoritative posing. If you read the journals, you will see that even the professionals can't agree on what the LT is, or how to measure it. People who work at health clubs are not professional coaches, and even professional coaches are not medical researchers. Paying for a "fitness profile" is like paying for a palm reading. It might make you feel better, but if there's any truth in it, that's only by coincidence.

Just get on the bike and ride hard enough that you can't comfortably hold a conversation with the person next to you. You should have to speak in short phrases, with a big breath in between. Do that for an hour. Your legs should be sore the next day. But not so sore that you can't get on the bike and do it again.

If you follow this plan, while maintaining your current diet, you will lose weight and you will become more fit. As you develop experience with your own response to exercise, you will learn how to target your intensity for the amount of time you have.

Listen to your body, not your heart monitor. You're not a machine.
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Old 11-04-05, 03:27 PM
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karlfitt
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This is my first experiance with a heart rate monitor. I have always gone on percived exertion level.

I have not been out on the road with it yet to see where my 7 level makes it on the heart rate monitor.

lws, I have never pushed that hard ofr that long. I have gone with a group from work here, and have struggled to keep up for 20 mins, but either thay slow down, or the road gets flatter and i can then hang with them for the rest of the ride.

bac, There is a hill I ride that would work for that test of MHR,
But where do i find this flat road you speak of here in Colorado?? ;-)


Thanks..

Oh and edit: My main goal is weight loss, secondary goal is of course increased fitness. I want to be able to hike, cross country ski, or chase after my kids without getting winded.

Last edited by karlfitt; 11-04-05 at 03:39 PM.
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