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tekhna 11-06-05 05:48 PM

Mainstream "whole grain" cereals-What are they actually?
 
I am thinking of cereals generally thought of as healthy-Cheerios, Wheaties, Corn Chex, Rice Chex, etc... Are they really whole grain or reasonably healthy? My understanding of the wholegrain guidelines is something only has to be 8% wholegrain to be labeled as such. Does anyone have any input on cereals like these?

cheebahmunkey 11-06-05 06:13 PM


Originally Posted by tekhna
I am thinking of cereals generally thought of as healthy-Cheerios, Wheaties, Corn Chex, Rice Chex, etc... Are they really whole grain or reasonably healthy? My understanding of the wholegrain guidelines is something only has to be 8% wholegrain to be labeled as such. Does anyone have any input on cereals like these?

I believe General Mills are whole grain. Not sure about others. BUT all have some amount of processed, refined, white sugar. Go with Kashi if you can find it. I love, love, love the Heart to Heart cereal. It's like cheerios only it's whole grain with no white sugar.

sjjone 11-06-05 06:27 PM

no, they're not. Read the label, if the first ingredient is not "whole wheat flour," put it back on the shelf and walk directly to the kashi section.

Kashi was on sale for 2.50 a box, so naturally I was stocking up on all the faves (go lean crunch, cinna rasin crunch, heart to heart, autum wheat). This lady was reading the label of go lean crunch and the label of some fruity version of special K. I made a comment about how much I love kashi, her response was "I do too, but this one is better" (in reference to the box of special whatever). I was very close to lecturing her on the evils of the partially hydrogenated oils, high fructose cornsyrup, and no fiber in her cereal, but decided not to.

tekhna 11-06-05 07:07 PM

Well, this just raises the issue of how to eat well in a school dorm/cafeteria setting. It's tough. I eat a lot of granola!

Al.canoe 11-06-05 08:05 PM


Originally Posted by sjjone
no, they're not. Read the label, if the first ingredient is not "whole wheat flour," put it back on the shelf and walk directly to the kashi section.

.

There are more common or domestic grains than wheat. Examples are oats and corn. Whole grain is nothing more than grain that has not been bleached or the fiber removed after milling, I believe. Whole grain will have roughly 4 grams of fiber/serving it seems from my observations. High fiber cereal seems to be 'doped' with additional fiber.

I'm a lover of cold cereal for breakfast. I was having to give it up because some 10 or more years ago they started putting trans-fats and corn syrup in them. The trans-fats are there to give that rich, smooth taste of fat that everybody loves. Corn syrup because the Federal government subsidizes corn production and maintains a minimum-price ceiling on sugar by guaranteeing to buy sugar if the price drops below a certain level. In other words, because of government intervention, corn syrup is a lot cheaper than sugar.

I was 'saved' by the organic movement since most organic cereals are not only whole grain, but also don't have the bad stuff. Surprisingly, they don't cost all that much more than the regular stuff. Publix is the only source in my area.

By the way, it's now been established that whole grain oats do tend to lower Cholesterol some ( a little) as claimed.

Al

AnthonyG 11-07-05 12:03 AM

For the low down on grains see this article,

http://www.westonaprice.org/foodfeatures/be_kind.html

The only healthy cereal still in some sort of common use is oats as porridge and even then it comes down to preperation methods used.

Regards, Anthony

rd400 11-07-05 06:09 AM

In Scotland we can buy jumbo oats from our health food stores and pin head oatmeal from most supermarkets. Being a Scott i cant help praising the mighty oat, alough i think every country has a similar whole grain cereal, i beleive it is best to maintain a macrobiotic diet when possible. Neither of these two forms of the oat contain corn syrup or any other added ingredients. Myself i am partial to a spoonfull of honey with my oats and not the traditional pinch of salt. Either way porridged oats gives a healthy hearty start to any morning.

Regards

Chris S-Riach

Al.canoe 11-07-05 06:30 AM


Originally Posted by AnthonyG
For the low down on grains see this article,

http://www.westonaprice.org/foodfeatures/be_kind.html

The only healthy cereal still in some sort of common use is oats as porridge and even then it comes down to preperation methods used.

Regards, Anthony

So, after reading the artical, do we give up grain unless we produce it ourselves? I might add another article in an issue in Scientific American a few months back. The article presented an argument with supporting data that shows that global warming gasses increased mostly due to the agricultural revolution (the growing of grain) rather than the industrial revolution.

Give up grain and be safer and more environmentally sensitive too?

Al

kuan 11-07-05 07:04 AM


Originally Posted by AnthonyG
For the low down on grains see this article,

http://www.westonaprice.org/foodfeatures/be_kind.html

The only healthy cereal still in some sort of common use is oats as porridge and even then it comes down to preperation methods used.

Regards, Anthony

Written by a person who has never worked with whole grains. Does anyone bake here? Does anyone ever use whole grains without soaking overnight?

Al.canoe 11-07-05 09:13 AM


Originally Posted by kuan
Written by a person who has never worked with whole grains. Does anyone bake here? Does anyone ever use whole grains without soaking overnight?

If I soaked over night, my skin would wrinkle like a prune. Good thing I don't bake.

Al

samundsen 11-07-05 10:23 AM


Originally Posted by kuan
Written by a person who has never worked with whole grains. Does anyone bake here? Does anyone ever use whole grains without soaking overnight?

I do. I buy organc whole grains (wheat and oats) in bulk, and grind them myself with an electric grinder, and make whole grain breads in my breadmachine. Makes the most wonderful, fluffy, incredibly well tasting breads that are 100% whole grain. I grind just enough flour to use it right away.

I've also made oat meal my flaking whole oats using a hand-crank flaker, but it was just too much work, and I prefer the milder taste of regular rolled oats (also organic, bought in bulk) anyways.

AnthonyG 11-08-05 05:30 AM

Finding top quality traditional breads as they were once made isn't easy and a big part of the problems is that because most people don't understand the benifits of them and apreciate them there isn't a big market for them. It's kind of a catch 22.

In Australia you can buy sprouted bread from the Pure Life company that's just the bee's knees. Try some sourdough bread from a small baker or deli store. Not all sourdough bread is up to the standard that the article reccomends but it's a start in the right direction. Look out for too many ingredients and soy flour. All there needs to be on the ingredient list is whole flour from whatever grain, water and salt.

Regards, Anthony

Katrogen 11-11-05 08:03 AM

This is what I absolutely love having every morning:
http://www.homegrocer.com/images/pro...-Grain_Hig.jpg http://www.northcountrypublicradio.o...tu/quaker1.jpg
They are great for a winter morning.
I'm a morning person. I also love Oats n Raisins bran but its not as awesome as oatmeal.

davesplace80 11-11-05 06:29 PM

no, they're not. Read the label, if the first ingredient is not "whole wheat flour," put it back on the shelf and walk directly to the kashi section.

Please help me out with this one. I just picked up a box of kashi cereal, I also got a loaf of bread and the first ingredient is "whole wheat flour". Why is this a bad choice? specifically "stone ground whole wheat"

Thanks in advance
Dave

BTW From the advice of this group, giving up "Low Carb" and now learning a more healthy way. :)

cheebahmunkey 11-12-05 11:54 AM

Now I have a question. If the ingredients of some product are given as "Yellow Corn Meal, Corn Bran......Oat Flour........" are any of those whole grains? Is it required to put "Whole Corn Bran"? Is there such a thing? This is from the label on Barbara's Bakery Puffins Cereal. I also ask because are Kettle Corn Chips a type of whole grain? Is popcorn since all it is is corn kernels with some oil and/or butter? Sorry for all the questions but I think there's a lot of uncertainty regarding corn products.


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