Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Training & Nutrition
Reload this Page >

running and interval training

Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

running and interval training

Old 03-07-06, 11:19 AM
  #1  
explody pup
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
running and interval training

I've been reading up on interval training and keep on getting inconsistent views. Which would be better:

1. Running hard for 30 seconds, running easy for 30 seconds - Repeat

2. Running as fast as you can sustain for 5 minutes, walking for 2 minutes - Repeat

3. Something completely different.

To give you some basis for this, I have a 5 mile run that I usually hit in about 40 minutes. So roughly 8 minute miles. I'd like to get this down and was told interval training can do this. I've never been a serious runner so this is mostly new to me.

Any advice is greatly appreciated.
 
Old 03-07-06, 12:26 PM
  #2  
yonderboy
Lurker for Life
 
yonderboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: PDX
Posts: 908
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
When I was training for 10K, we used to do a mix of different intervals:

1. On the track, run 300 meters at a mile pace, jog 100m, repeat 10 times
2. With a buddy, first runs 200m at mile pace, the second starts when the first finishes 200m, the first jogs across the track before the second finishes 200m, repeat 10 times
3. Tempo runs
4. Hill repeats
5. 10x100m to finish the workout

We'd do one of these workouts about twice a week during the racing season. Start off with maybe 6 to 8 reps at first, then work your way up. It'll take a few weeks before you start getting comfortable with them.

As always, make sure you're good and warmed up before you start into these. Run about 20 to 30 minutes and stretch.
yonderboy is offline  
Old 03-07-06, 12:48 PM
  #3  
DannoXYZ 
Senior Member
 
DannoXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Saratoga, CA
Posts: 11,739
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
There are different types of intervals...
DannoXYZ is offline  
Old 03-07-06, 03:39 PM
  #4  
Guest
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
Ditto to Danno.

What are your goals? What is your fitness level? Without knowing at least those two components, there's very little you'll get out of intervals. You can only take intervals so far before you need a lot more information so you can hone your intervals to meet your fitness goals.

Koffee
 
Old 03-07-06, 06:51 PM
  #5  
explody pup
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
Yeah, that was vague.

So nevermind until I learn a little more.
 
Old 03-07-06, 07:41 PM
  #6  
Enthalpic
Killing Rabbits
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 5,432
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 151 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by koffee brown
Ditto to Danno.

What are your goals? What is your fitness level? Without knowing at least those two components, there's very little you'll get out of intervals. You can only take intervals so far before you need a lot more information so you can hone your intervals to meet your fitness goals.

Koffee
In his post he states that his goal is faster 5 mile runs.
In his post he says that his current fitness level is 5miles in 40 min or 8min/mile.

Put your best 5mile time trial into this calculator for pacing your different weekly runs.

http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/news/article.asp?UAN=1676

Personally, if I were you my intervals (for 5mile improvement) would be half miles in 3:30 or 7min/mile pace. Recovery would only be 1min jogging; if you recover too much you will be a fast half miler not a 5 miler.

Last edited by Enthalpic; 03-08-06 at 11:42 AM.
Enthalpic is offline  
Old 03-08-06, 11:16 AM
  #7  
terrymorse
Climbing Fool
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 3,041

Bikes: Scott Addict R1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 8 Posts
There's very little science to compare the effectiveness of differing interval durations and frequencies.

But all things being equal, the interval session that produces more time spent at a target level of effort will be more effective.

Say you're targeting your threshold effort (which is a good thing to do). If you can do multiple 3-minute intervals at your threshold, finishing the last one at the same effort as the first one, then you've found an effective interval session for yourself.

But if you find 3 minutes too long to sustain that level of effort over multiple intervals, try a shorter time. Conversely, if you still have plenty of energy at the end of the session, try lengthening the interval time.

The recovery period is only useful to allow you to complete the interval session, it can be as short or as long as you need it to be. You can jog or walk, whichever you prefer -- just keep moving.
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat
terrymorse is offline  
Old 03-09-06, 06:45 PM
  #8  
ChezJfrey
Rider in the Storm
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 736

Bikes: LeMond Zurich, KHS Fiero (Fixed), Centurion Ironman Expert

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I might add that running is a lot harder on the body than cycling. I think if you are only running 5 miles in 40 minutes, you are probably not an experienced runner and tackling intervals is probably begging for injury. I suggest building your body to handle the stresses of faster running before trying intervals. This will require running a substantial base at a slower pace, for a longer period of time in order to strengthen your joints/muscles and to avoid injury.

I'm also willing to bet that if you worked up to 60+ miles per week (hard/easy cycles for adequate recovery), you would have no trouble running 5 miles in 35 minutes WITHOUT a single interval session. Granted this may take 9 months to a year, but you will likely be faster and have much better endurance....but most people don't like to wait, so they do as much as they can as fast as they can...and sooner, rather than later, they end up sidelined.

Last edited by ChezJfrey; 03-09-06 at 06:53 PM.
ChezJfrey is offline  
Old 03-09-06, 09:15 PM
  #9  
TysonB
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Cushing, Oklahoma
Posts: 628

Bikes: 1969 Peugeot U08, unknown MTB circa 1980, '93? Merckx MX-Leader

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Pup,

You have already seen a variety of opinions here. My two cents is from a summer of working out with my 18 year old daughter trying out for an NCAA soccer team. Already in very good shape, she religiously adhered to a workout program the coach sent her. We did it together for the whole summer. Amazing.

We both got into great shape and our speed increased dramatically. (I was a decent 55-year old 5k-10K recreational runner and avid swimmer.)

The emphasis was on getting more speed out of top athletes who already have endurance for 90 minute games. The program had interval training as a key component.

The coach emphasized that the intervals were to allow nearly (but not complete) recovery. He wanted you to have enough energy to run the drill at top speed each and every time, rather than just stumbling through at your lowered max capacity caused by too short a recovery period. The improvement I saw at the end of the summer made me re-think my opinion about training in general. I now FIRMLY believe that the recovery period is a crucial part of the work out.

Sorry if this isn't too helpful. Use this opinion with others offered elsewhere while you design a training program to meet your needs.

Tyson
TysonB is offline  
Old 03-10-06, 02:49 PM
  #10  
kuan
Twincities MN
 
kuan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Salsa, Cannondale, Surly.
Posts: 2,528
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by terrymorse

But all things being equal, the interval session that produces more time spent at a target level of effort will be more effective.
Terry, or someone else, can you please clear up something that's bugging me?

Say the target is right around LT. Is the point to eventually stay at that target level for longer? ie., are we training to endure pain?
__________________
www.marrow.org
kuan is offline  
Old 03-10-06, 03:01 PM
  #11  
cod3man
-default-
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Canada
Posts: 103

Bikes: 3 of them

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My bet would be interval training is always above LT. It could be a real long interval if it is always below LT. It is meant to increase your LT, by your body learning to adapt to the stress. The more you do it the better your body becomes at it. Which is why there are so many different types of workout plans out there. You need to stress your body differently to grow more optimally.

Try both plans for a month each with a recovery week in between. Then you can tell us which one worked for you. Try to keep conditions the same though- nutrition- time of day etc... pretend your a scientist. But a fast one.
cod3man is offline  
Old 03-10-06, 03:08 PM
  #12  
kuan
Twincities MN
 
kuan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Salsa, Cannondale, Surly.
Posts: 2,528
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cod3man
My bet would be interval training is always above LT.
D'uh yes of course! Silly me. I guess the workout right around LT would be the tempo run.
__________________
www.marrow.org
kuan is offline  
Old 03-11-06, 01:20 AM
  #13  
terrymorse
Climbing Fool
 
terrymorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 3,041

Bikes: Scott Addict R1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by kuan
D'uh yes of course! Silly me. I guess the workout right around LT would be the tempo run.
Tempo's a bit lower than LT. You can only do about an hour of LT training before exhaustion, but you can do tempo for at least a few hours.
__________________
Ride, Rest, Repeat
terrymorse is offline  
Old 03-12-06, 06:24 PM
  #14  
kuan
Twincities MN
 
kuan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Salsa, Cannondale, Surly.
Posts: 2,528
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by terrymorse
Tempo's a bit lower than LT. You can only do about an hour of LT training before exhaustion, but you can do tempo for at least a few hours.
OK, thanks again for clearing that up for me. All these levels and HR percentages and words are confusing. At some point we're gonna switch to metric right?
__________________
www.marrow.org
kuan is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
EnigManiac
Recumbent
9
02-02-09 08:27 PM
johnny99
Northern California
8
08-20-08 05:36 AM
frameteam2003
Texas
0
10-07-06 09:10 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.