Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Training & Nutrition
Reload this Page >

How do you use Sugar and Carbs?

Notices
Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

How do you use Sugar and Carbs?

Old 01-07-12, 01:14 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Nick Bain's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Driftless
Posts: 1,832

Bikes: Caad8, Mukluk 3, Trek Superfly, Gary Fisher Irwin.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
How do you use Sugar and Carbs?

In the last year i've realized how sugar affects my body, they say carbs can turn into sugar depending how you take them, so I will loosely add that to the mix.

I find that sugar (pop) helps me best when taken during moderately-intense to intense-maximal physical activity when my last full meal (lunch) was 3-4 hours ago. I literally feel relatively unstoppable!!!

However when just sitting around or doing light activity sugar just seems to drag me down almost all the time. Especially a pop during or right after lunch.

Generally I am not a big fan of carbs lately, they seem to make me tired and hungry mainly breads and bars seem the worst, Is it working like sugar? how can I use carbs better?

I have been liking a higher animal protein/fat diet that i've been trying this past year as well.

Still have trouble eating veggies daily, but usually get almost enough fruit.

I am not worried about being fat, just performance.

I also take up to half a pot of coffee almost daily and sometimes too much booze.

Last edited by Nick Bain; 01-07-12 at 01:19 AM.
Nick Bain is offline  
Old 01-07-12, 02:19 AM
  #2  
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 52,152

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 141 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3203 Post(s)
Liked 593 Times in 327 Posts
I quit drinking sugared pop in 1988 ... except for the occasional sugared beverage during a long ride. I don't like drinking my calories.

I also quit drinking sugared sports drinks about 18 months ago.

Try replacing the coffee and alcohol with plain water. When you feel tired, drink a glass of cold water.

You should be consuming several servings of veggies each day ... more than fruit. Focus on lean proteins, whole grains, and veggies.

And yes, all carbs get converted to sugar.
Machka is offline  
Old 01-07-12, 10:42 AM
  #3  
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 19,420

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3830 Post(s)
Liked 1,867 Times in 1,337 Posts
Carbs and sugar are about the same thing. Your experience:
I find that sugar (pop) helps me best when taken during moderately-intense to intense-maximal physical activity when my last full meal (lunch) was 3-4 hours ago. I literally feel relatively unstoppable!!!
is because that's exactly what you're supposed to do. That works. You also need a good dose of carbs and protein immediately after a hard or long ride. Otherwise, in normal life, getting your carbs from veggies and fruit is fine.

I'd like to add that pop isn't the best thing. While some racing teams are essentially using high fructose corn syrup, the usual sweetener in pop, as the secret ingredient in their sports drink, pop also contains a lot of other stuff that's not good for you. Notice the ingredients are not listed on the label. Most folks find that a powdered sports drink is better and cheaper than pop, and the ingredients are on the label. Also, never drink pop when you're not riding. Not a good idea. Also, never drink diet pop. The only ingredients are things that are not good for you.

Last edited by Carbonfiberboy; 01-07-12 at 11:15 AM. Reason: trashing pop
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 01-07-12, 05:11 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
ericm979's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains
Posts: 6,169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
"Carbs and sugar are about the same thing."

Complex carbs don't cause as much of an insulin response as simple carbs, so there's no blood sugar crash an hour later. If I eat a donut I'll feel queasy in an hour because of the blood sugar crash but a whole wheat bagel doesn't have the same effect.

Simple carbs are ok during rides and for recovery afterwards (if the ride was long enough and you're riding again the next day).

Soda is not good for you. One or two a year won't hurt but don't make it a regular habit.

Sports drink and bars are convienent but I'm becoming convinced that real food works better. It certainly tastes better. On today's 5 hour ride I had a whole wheat bagel with cream cheese, a couple rice-based muffins from a recipe out of Allen Lim's book, and a couple rice cakes of my own recipe. I didn't have any stomach problems like I do with gels, and I didn't feel like I was hungry all the time like with bars, or like I had to choke down chemically sweetened sawdust.
ericm979 is offline  
Old 01-07-12, 10:12 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Nick Bain's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Driftless
Posts: 1,832

Bikes: Caad8, Mukluk 3, Trek Superfly, Gary Fisher Irwin.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
funny someone just sent me this email:

https://www.slipstreamsports.com/2008...lammatory-diet
Nick Bain is offline  
Old 01-07-12, 11:49 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 14,277
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I've come to the same conclusions with the exception of caffeine, alcohol, and meat. The first two in moderation and the last item not at all due to digestive issues. Vegetarian diets tend to gravitate towards a high carb diet. Restricting the amount of carbs I eat down to more moderate level has resulted in me feeling much improved. However, on long ride days I tend to eat more complex carbs. I am unsure if I will use simple carbs again. They do seem helpful if consumed with a complex carb when you are in the hole energy wise but that is just about it. The blood sugar spikes while riding are rather annoying.
DataJunkie is offline  
Old 01-11-12, 05:55 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
blueduckxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 193
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
cut out the alcohol, and all that coffee [sure a cup a day is fine, maybe even 2]
blueduckxx is offline  
Old 01-11-12, 06:48 PM
  #8  
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 19,420

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3830 Post(s)
Liked 1,867 Times in 1,337 Posts
Originally Posted by DataJunkie
I've come to the same conclusions with the exception of caffeine, alcohol, and meat. The first two in moderation and the last item not at all due to digestive issues. Vegetarian diets tend to gravitate towards a high carb diet. Restricting the amount of carbs I eat down to more moderate level has resulted in me feeling much improved. However, on long ride days I tend to eat more complex carbs. I am unsure if I will use simple carbs again. They do seem helpful if consumed with a complex carb when you are in the hole energy wise but that is just about it. The blood sugar spikes while riding are rather annoying.
If you have blood sugar spikes while riding, you're eating too much at one time, meaning also not frequently enough. Eat every 15 minutes and seldom more than 100 calories at a time, even at a rest stop. I get the best result using the highest GI carbs I can find on rides under 200 miles. Over that, I start to use more complex foods.
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 01-11-12, 10:31 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 14,277
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I have that issue with any amount of high glycemic foods. I feel like crap unless it is an intense effort where my body uses the sugar relatively quickly.
Temperamental stomach = small amounts of food especially when riding.
DataJunkie is offline  
Old 01-12-12, 01:06 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Nick Bain's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Driftless
Posts: 1,832

Bikes: Caad8, Mukluk 3, Trek Superfly, Gary Fisher Irwin.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by blueduckxx
cut out the alcohol, and all that coffee [sure a cup a day is fine, maybe even 2]
btw a half pot is only 3 cups in my world.
Nick Bain is offline  
Old 01-12-12, 01:10 PM
  #11  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Nick Bain's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Driftless
Posts: 1,832

Bikes: Caad8, Mukluk 3, Trek Superfly, Gary Fisher Irwin.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
After reading the eating habits of kenyan runners, posted for some reason in the road racing section, it has occurred to me that perhaps I have been not riding hard enough or frequently enough to enjoy a carb loaded diet.
Nick Bain is offline  
Old 01-13-12, 08:05 AM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I would ditch the alcohol and coffee (tea would probably be a wiser, milder choice if you must have caffeine) and eat more veggies. As for the carbs and simple sugars: I'd lean heavily towards complex carbs balanced with protein and good fats (approx. a 40/30/30 ratio to start with, then modify over time according to your individual metabolism, types/amount of exercise, and weight goals), and avoid simple carbs except during and immediately after intense exercise.

And I would drop the soda like a plague-ridden rat. If nothing else, the acids in those drinks can destroy your teeth over time. Try fruit juice or a fruit/veggie juice blend, so it has some nutritive value instead of just chemicals and empty calories. (A good rule of thumb: if a calorie source offers no protein, fiber, vitamins, or minerals, consider an alternative.)
Six-Shooter is offline  
Old 01-13-12, 11:58 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
blueduckxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 193
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Nick Bain
btw a half pot is only 3 cups in my world.
yeah I have 1 a day. maybe an espresso, depends on the amount I am riding.
blueduckxx is offline  
Old 01-13-12, 02:32 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 14,277
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I rather enjoy Irish Breakfast tea. The amount of caffeine in coffee severely wires me up but it can make for a speedy ride if I drink a cup beforehand.
DataJunkie is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
DXchulo
Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling
21
06-05-17 03:33 AM
avidone1
General Cycling Discussion
25
08-27-15 08:03 AM
Grad
Training & Nutrition
8
08-12-15 10:26 AM
relnix
Road Cycling
20
06-02-13 08:22 AM
paulclaude
Training & Nutrition
8
03-28-10 06:53 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.