Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Training & Nutrition
Reload this Page >

Long Distance nutrition. Electrolytes, Energy, Snacks and more.

Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

Long Distance nutrition. Electrolytes, Energy, Snacks and more.

Old 04-30-14, 08:51 AM
  #1  
mrkano
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 174
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Long Distance nutrition. Electrolytes, Energy, Snacks and more.

(I did do a search on here for electrolytes and there is sufficient posts, so after reading them I would like to start a new thread)

I ant to start taking nutrition and supplements a bit more serious now, as I plan to start fitting in 100 miles a week +.

The last ride I was on a friend introduced me to HI5 zero or some other energy supplement (I am waiting for him to give me specifics).

Hydration and food is important, but after reading about electrolytes and other essentials it seems like there is a lot more to consider than just water and a tasty flapjack.

Would it suffice to simply place 2 electrolyte pills in a water bottle each time. And munch on raisins, dried fruit, nuts and energy bars lets say during a 75 mile ride.

What are the main supplements I should look at?

Can I get the essentials that any supplement will give me from food alone?

Or is it a must that you must use these supplements for such factors as electrolytes and the others.

After 35 miles I didn't feel a flinch, and these were some tough roads!

Even all the way to the end of the 75 miles I could have still gone for more, and the only supplements as such that I had was these HI5 tablets.

Advice welcome.
mrkano is offline  
Old 04-30-14, 10:50 AM
  #2  
Vlaam4ever
Senior Member
 
Vlaam4ever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lake Claire, GA
Posts: 802

Bikes: 2008 Giant TCR Advanced

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If you feel fine on the 75 mile ride with just some water, electrolytes and a small sack. you should be ok for 100 miles with 30% more of each(50 % for good measure)

You don't mention how long you are riding nor what temperatures you are exposed to when you ride. This could help other give you recommendations.

for advice. Here is how I get it done for anything that could go over 2.5 hours or 40 miles. I bring various ways to get 3 key things - 1 Water 2 Electrolytes 3 Energy.

1 bottle water
1 bottle Gatorade mix
a banana
Fig bar or something similar.

If I run out of water or Gatorade I'll refill with water.

I'm experimenting with some new sports drinks that have better taste and fewer calories. This is a personal preference we each need to work out for ourselves.
Vlaam4ever is offline  
Old 04-30-14, 11:03 AM
  #3  
blacknbluebikes
Senior Member
 
blacknbluebikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: NJ, USA
Posts: 317

Bikes: two blacks, a blue and a white.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
real food, and why:

Feed Zone Portables: A Cookbook of On-the-Go Food for Athletes (The Feed Zone): Biju K. Thomas, Allen Lim, Taylor Phinney, Tim Johnson: 9781937715007: Amazon.com: Books
blacknbluebikes is offline  
Old 04-30-14, 03:55 PM
  #4  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 14,873

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 85 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1758 Post(s)
Liked 18 Times in 16 Posts
When it's hot and you're drinking a lot of water, yes, you have to have electrolytes. I use Endurolytes. People don't normally need to take electrolytes, but they're not exercising hard in the heat for hours.

Everyone uses a different amount. You have to find what's right for you. I take enough so that I'm slightly thirsty even though I'm drinking enough so that I have to pee every 2-3 hours. No pee, more electrolytes and water. More pee, less of the same.

The standard for on the bike nutrition is 200-250 calories/hour for rides over 3 hours. Which means on the long ride you start eating like that right from the start, not after 3 hours. You can eat or drink anything you like. There are a zillion options. You have to ask other riders in your area and experiment on yourself to find what you like and can tolerate. There have been on-the-bike food threads on this forum and on the long distance forum. Probably on the road bike forum, too.
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 05-01-14, 01:39 AM
  #5  
mrkano
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 174
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If you feel fine on the 75 mile ride with just some water, electrolytes and a small sack. you should be ok for 100 miles with 30% more of each(50 % for good measure)
So electrolytes are the only essential? What about energy gels? Because you don't necessarily get energy from electrolyte products do you?
mrkano is offline  
Old 05-01-14, 06:33 AM
  #6  
GeorgeBMac
Senior Member
 
GeorgeBMac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 2,061

Bikes: 2012 Trek DS 8.5 all weather hybrid, 2008 LeMond Poprad cyclocross, 1992 Cannondale R500 roadbike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mrkano View Post
So electrolytes are the only essential? What about energy gels? Because you don't necessarily get energy from electrolyte products do you?
No! You Don't!

Electrolytes and energy foods are two separate, different things that serve different physiologic needs...

The body needs energy -- and carbs are the simplest, most efficient source of that energy.

But, to use that energy, the body needs to maintain its balance (called "homeostasis") of electrolytes. Without the proper balance of electrolytes, your body cannot process the energy and bad things happen. Usually, your body is incredibly adept at maintaining that balance. But, when you sweat it out or overly dilute it with massive quantities of pure water, your system is overwhelmed and falls out of homeostasis.

When you go on a hard, long, hot ride, you FIRST need hydration, THEN you need energy, THEN you need electrolytes.... In that order. And, depending on the length, exertion and heat, you may need only one or two (or maybe none) of those things.

(Some people advocate starting with the energy -- and they have a point because it takes your body longer to process the energy than it does hydration. So, if you are planning a long ride, it may make sense to take energy right along with the hydration)


edit to add: AND: your body also needs things like protein, vitamins, electrolytes and certain minerals -- but they are more long term and best acquired by a complete and healthy diet...

Last edited by GeorgeBMac; 05-01-14 at 06:45 AM.
GeorgeBMac is offline  
Old 05-01-14, 06:43 AM
  #7  
Vlaam4ever
Senior Member
 
Vlaam4ever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lake Claire, GA
Posts: 802

Bikes: 2008 Giant TCR Advanced

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mrkano View Post
So electrolytes are the only essential? What about energy gels? Because you don't necessarily get energy from electrolyte products do you?
Incorrect, Each are equally essential to a varying degree based on the elements. humidity, temperature, difficulty of terrain, pace of the group.

Experiment with electrolytes to find the taste your like. I think the energy replacement has already been discussed in earlier responses. BTW the book mentioned above is great.
Vlaam4ever is offline  
Old 05-01-14, 07:52 AM
  #8  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,399

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 128 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2850 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 33 Posts
Salted almonds will give you both calories (energy) and electrolytes.

A combination of beef jerky or potato chips and orange juice will do the same.

So you can get your electrolytes from food, and eating these foods while riding (or on breaks) will work ... to a point.

If you're doing a 75 mile ride on a mild day, they should be just fine. But if you're thinking of doing long distances, and especially if you're doing long distances on hot days, you'll probably want the electrolyte pills.

Note that electrolytes are simply minerals: sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and chloride. These minerals don't provide energy, but they do keep things in balance. If you consume electrolytes, you have a significantly reduced chance of suffering from hyponatraemia and you will also have a reduced chance of nausea and stomach issues on a long ride.
Machka is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Fastfingaz
Touring
8
04-03-16 08:08 PM
abstractform20
Road Cycling
9
10-17-12 06:35 PM
tonym
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
29
05-27-07 11:55 AM
HiYoSilver
Training & Nutrition
15
12-11-04 07:22 AM
Ric
Forum Suggestions & User Assistance
10
10-30-03 03:15 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.