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Is this a sign of my metabolism slowing down?

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Is this a sign of my metabolism slowing down?

Old 06-12-14, 02:05 PM
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Is this a sign of my metabolism slowing down?

I like to always exercise before breakfast. So like today I did 2.5 hours on the bike easy. I have noticed that I can ride for 2.5-3 hours before needing food on the ride. It used to be only like 1 hour. I am jsut curious cause I have been gaining weight a little too but in the midsection only. Is 3000 calories too much for training 15-20 hours a week? It might be?...

Thanks
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Old 06-12-14, 11:18 PM
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The first thing is that your ability to burn fat improves with volume. Your metabolism isn't slowing down if you're still doing the same pace at the same RPE as usual. With that many hours/week, you should be speeding up slightly unless you keep going easier. That said, it is entirely possible that you are getting a little more muscularly efficient. Massed practice works.

The second thing is that you're eating too much. Drop your potions sizes or snack sizes a little. Might not take much. It isn't true that you can eat whatever you want if you just ride enough. I've tried that.
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Old 06-13-14, 05:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy

The second thing is that you're eating too much. Drop your potions sizes or snack sizes a little. Might not take much. It isn't true that you can eat whatever you want if you just ride enough. I've tried that.

*sits down pint of ice cream*

Can too. You just have to lift weights and ride a lot, and be under 30
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Old 06-13-14, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by hambertloot
I like to always exercise before breakfast. So like today I did 2.5 hours on the bike easy. I have noticed that I can ride for 2.5-3 hours before needing food on the ride. It used to be only like 1 hour. I am jsut curious cause I have been gaining weight a little too but in the midsection only. Is 3000 calories too much for training 15-20 hours a week? It might be?...

Thanks
If you're gaining weight, then yes whatever you're eating is too much. I ride about 15 hrs/wk and need around 3500 to maintain, for 20 hrs I would need 4000. It depends how hard your ride and your current weight and muscle mass.

As far as not needing to eat for 2.5-3 hrs, you could be gaining fitness and hence riding at a lower intensity which will tend to burn a higher percentage of fat. Once you are reasonably fit you should be able to ride hard for at least a couple of hours in the fasted state and longer if you go easier.
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Old 06-13-14, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by bmontgomery87
*sits down pint of ice cream*

Can too. You just have to lift weights and ride a lot, and be under 30
Yeah, as one of my professors once noted at the top of one of my papers, "NSDT." When I ran Nordic at 18, I ate a lot and weighed 140. Breakfast: 2 12 oz. glasses OJ, 2 12 oz. glasses milk, 3 eggs, 2 pcs. toast with jam. As it is said, I remember doing things, but don't remember how.
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Old 06-13-14, 04:19 PM
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Originally Posted by bmontgomery87
*sits down pint of ice cream*

Can too. You just have to lift weights and ride a lot, and be under 30
No you don't have to be under 30 ...I am 44 and I can eat ice cream and drink chocolate milk every singe day and still have a body of a 20 year old....Yeah for sure, lifting weights and sprinting on my fixie helps a lot.
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Old 06-13-14, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by gregf83
If you're gaining weight, then yes whatever you're eating is too much. I ride about 15 hrs/wk and need around 3500 to maintain, for 20 hrs I would need 4000. It depends how hard your ride and your current weight and muscle mass.
Plus it also depends on how thin you want to get. If you come from a family of heavier relatives it's going to be hard to get really skinny. Even guys like Chris Horner and Bradley Wiggins had to eat a fairly strict diet in order to get down to their race winning weights. Those guys are probably burning 15-20k calories on the bike in a typical training week (if not more.)

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Old 06-13-14, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Dunbar
Plus it also depends on how thin you want to get. If you come from a family of heavier relatives it's going to be hard to get really skinny. Even guys like Chris Horner and Bradley Wiggins had to eat a fairly strict diet in order to get down to their race winning weights. Those guys are probably burning 15-20k calories on the bike in a typical training week (if not more.)
i always assumed they had to stuff their faces hard to keep from wasting away, considering how much they ride.
i ride 150ish per week on a fixed gear and i eat quite a bit, and have trouble maintaining or gaining at the moment.
can't even imagine how much i'd have to eat if i raced.
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Old 06-13-14, 09:41 PM
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Originally Posted by bmontgomery87
i always assumed they had to stuff their faces hard to keep from wasting away, considering how much they ride.
Wiggins famously said he had to give up beer for one year to get down to his TDF winning weight. Probably a rough thing to do for a Brit.

I forget where I read an interview with Horner where he said to win the Vuelta he had to lose another ~10-15lbs. That's a guy who has been thin his whole life and he said that he really had to watch what he ate (something he never had to worry about before.)

Admittedly some pros get down to some pretty ridiculous weights. Wiggins at 6'3" and 160lbs. being the the more extreme example.
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Old 06-17-14, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Dunbar
I forget where I read an interview with Horner where he said to win the Vuelta he had to lose another ~10-15lbs. That's a guy who has been thin his whole life and he said that he really had to watch what he ate (something he never had to worry about before.
So if you lose the weight by putting your blood in bags but then put it back in mid tour aren't you at a loss of 0?
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Old 06-17-14, 03:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Dunbar
Wiggins famously said he had to give up beer for one year to get down to his TDF winning weight. Probably a rough thing to do for a Brit.

I forget where I read an interview with Horner where he said to win the Vuelta he had to lose another ~10-15lbs. That's a guy who has been thin his whole life and he said that he really had to watch what he ate (something he never had to worry about before.)

Admittedly some pros get down to some pretty ridiculous weights. Wiggins at 6'3" and 160lbs. being the the more extreme example.
That is only a BMI of 20.0 just an FYI, which is not that lean compared to guys like Marco Pantani BMI of 19.2, same with Rausmussen, and I am sure there are guys in the peloton hovering the 18.5-19.0 BMI range.
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Old 06-17-14, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by chriscarnegie1
I am sure there are guys in the peloton hovering the 18.5-19.0 BMI range.
I don't know how you can look at a guy like Froome or Wiggins and think it is anywhere near "normal" body weight for their height. The standards of professional cycling are that you can virtually never be too light.
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Old 06-17-14, 05:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Dunbar
I don't know how you can look at a guy like Froome or Wiggins and think it is anywhere near "normal" body weight for their height. The standards of professional cycling are that you can virtually never be too light.
I am just searching them and their weight/height and it all says it is in the 20s. Idk but that is still quite in the middle of the range of "healthy" theorestically, but yes you're right that forgetting the stats, how they "look" is really different: lean to say the least
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Old 06-17-14, 10:00 PM
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This isn't very nice of me to say but I was watching Froome in the Dauphine and couldn't help but think he looked like one of these:

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Old 07-17-14, 08:38 AM
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it's all down hill after 30
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