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Shorty Tri-Bars ?

Old 10-14-10, 02:35 PM
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JoeOxfordCT
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Shorty Tri-Bars ?

Hi All,

I've been watching alot of Triathlons on Universal Sports. I see alot of National Level competitions where the competitors are on regular road bikes with just the little shorty tri-bars ? I don't race, road or tri, but I like doing fast century rides on my CAAD9 and would like to try the little tri-bars.

Is there is specific category of these tri-bars that I can Google ? Also, would I have to make any other adjustments to my bike to get the most out of the bars ? I would prefer not to make any drastic adjustments. I do also do some fast group rides as well.

Thanks,

J.
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Old 10-14-10, 04:43 PM
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The short bars are for draft legal triathlons. They are made to follow the rules set by ITU (bars cannot extend farther than the hoods) so in a crash, no one gets impaled (hopefully). As far as google goes, just type in short aerobars, and you should find some. Profile designs makes the T2+ DL which is a good short aerobar set. Although for your purposes, there is no real difference between short and long, so get whatever is comfortable, or cheap for that matter.

As for adjustments, that depends on what you want to do. If you are trying to go as fast as your body could possibly go in a century, then you will need to get a new seatpost and ride in the TT position. That gets the MOST out of the bars (and if you did that, you should probably get long bars) Since you still want to do group rides, I don't recommend this, just clip on the bars and go, it's still an advantage.

Also don't bring any kind of aerobars to group rides, and if you do, definitely don't use them. you will be a bit more unstable, and people will probably yell at you.
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Old 10-14-10, 08:13 PM
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Originally Posted by sirious94 View Post
The short bars are for draft legal triathlons. They are made to follow the rules set by ITU (bars cannot extend farther than the hoods) so in a crash, no one gets impaled (hopefully). As far as google goes, just type in short aerobars, and you should find some. Profile designs makes the T2+ DL which is a good short aerobar set. Although for your purposes, there is no real difference between short and long, so get whatever is comfortable, or cheap for that matter.

As for adjustments, that depends on what you want to do. If you are trying to go as fast as your body could possibly go in a century, then you will need to get a new seatpost and ride in the TT position. That gets the MOST out of the bars (and if you did that, you should probably get long bars) Since you still want to do group rides, I don't recommend this, just clip on the bars and go, it's still an advantage.

Also don't bring any kind of aerobars to group rides, and if you do, definitely don't use them. you will be a bit more unstable, and people will probably yell at you.
Totally agree. You've a nice bike to start with, make a few small, non-permanent changes and see how you like it. If you get hooked, seriously look at a TT/Tri bike as a second bike. Doesn't need to be new but the geometry is quite specialised ( ie more upright) and absolutely worth it if you are going to race regularly at a competitive level.

Last edited by 900aero; 10-14-10 at 08:14 PM. Reason: additional comment
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Old 10-16-10, 04:48 PM
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Have a look at the Cinelli Spinaci shortie bars. Loads of roadies had them a few years back until the UCI made them illegal. They are great little things and weigh next to nothing, and come up frequently on eBay for next to nothing. The 3TTT equivalent is the Tiramisu.
If your fellow roadies shout at you for using them on your next century ride, well, it's quicker to get to the brake hoods from a set of Spinacis than from the drops, and this has been proven (apparently)





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Old 10-17-10, 06:10 AM
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Another quick thought: don't forget that the whole point of aero bars is to help you keep an aero position for longer in greater comfort. The upright seat geometry of TT bikes is also designed to acheive the most aero body position. Once you hit 30km/h, wind resistance is the majority of the energy you expend. Keeping an aero position with your body is one way to make the most of every efffort your legs, lungs & heart are making.

I must also say though, if you're not racing as per your statement, all of this is pretty unecessary. The only advantage will be to keep you fresher for longer.

hope this helps.
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Old 10-19-10, 10:37 AM
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Most aero-bars can be cut down (and should be, as they're delivered long enough for tall people).

So, if you want to retain a normal roadie seat position, and just want an extra position, most will do in a pinch.

You will likely want a set that has a very low stack height (so you don't have to adjust the stem position). And arm pads with lots of rearward adjust-ability.

The Profile T2+ is a good bet, but look around, you'll find something that works.
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Old 10-19-10, 07:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Barchettaman View Post
well, it's quicker to get to the brake hoods from a set of Spinacis than from the drops, and this has been proven (apparently)
Why do you care about how fast you can get from the drops to the hoods? You can already brake and shift from the drops.
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Old 10-25-10, 02:19 AM
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Oops, quite correct.

What I meant to say was it´s apparently as fast to get across to the brake hoods from the Cinelli bars as it is from the tops. Sorry for any confusion.

The point being that the UCI banned the little bars because they were ´unsafe´ - Cinelli countered with a study that showed they were no more ´dangerous´than riding on the tops of the bars.

Cheers all
Simon
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Old 10-30-10, 10:39 AM
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I find myself training with alot of ITU competitive triathletes who use the short bars and road bikes. Following their suit, I also picked up the bars and find them to be very comfortable, they arn't quite as comfortable to me as a tri-specific bike, but they provide a nice aero advantage when you your pulling at the front or when out riding on your own.
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