Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Utility Cycling
Reload this Page >

Patrol Bike

Notices
Utility Cycling Want to haul groceries, beer, maybe even your kids? You don't have to live car free to put your bike to use as a workhorse. Here's the place to share and learn about the bicycle as a utility vehicle.

Patrol Bike

Old 06-06-23, 03:20 PM
  #1  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
rdlange's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 139

Bikes: '76 Peugeot Mixte UE-18, Bridgestone 'Submariner' picklefork mixte, Bridgestone KABUKI picklefork mixte, TREK MT220

Liked 10 Times in 2 Posts
Patrol Bike

https://survivalblog.com/2023/06/06/...e-kim-kipling/
rdlange is offline  
Old 06-07-23, 10:47 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
blacknbluebikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: NJ, USA
Posts: 1,286

Bikes: two blacks, a blue and a white.

Liked 859 Times in 412 Posts
peddling preppers. yep, we got those, too.
blacknbluebikes is offline  
Likes For blacknbluebikes:
Old 06-08-23, 05:18 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
brianinc-ville's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Greenville, NC
Posts: 1,390
Liked 59 Times in 42 Posts
I didn't quite read the whole thing, but I would say that the dude needs to think a little bit more about both front and rear racks. Attach to the frame, man. You don't want to rely on a seatpost clamp when the commies come for you.
brianinc-ville is offline  
Likes For brianinc-ville:
Old 06-09-23, 05:39 AM
  #4  
Tinker-er
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Mid-Atlantic
Posts: 556

Bikes: 1956 Rudge Sports; 1983 Univega Alpina Uno; 1981 Miyata 610; 1973 Raleigh Twenty; 1994 Breezer Lightning XTR; V4 Yuba Mundo aka "The Schlepper"; 1987 Raleigh "The Edge" Mountain Trials; 1952 R.O. Harrison "Madison"

Liked 338 Times in 223 Posts
Olive Drab and flat black are invisibility cloaks, just like a Klingon bird of prey.
PhilFo is offline  
Likes For PhilFo:
Old 07-26-23, 12:51 PM
  #5  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 7
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Needs a Punisher Logo
Uspsated is offline  
Old 07-27-23, 07:19 AM
  #6  
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 30,058

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Liked 1,606 Times in 1,084 Posts
Originally Posted by Uspsated
Needs a Punisher Logo
This bike that I had in Kandahar was nothing special but did have a neat logo.


I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 07-28-23, 07:27 AM
  #7  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2023
Posts: 12
Liked 12 Times in 3 Posts
I always wondered why there weren't more (or any) bikes in zombie apocalypse movies. Everyone's driving cars like nothing changed. Can't think of any that feature a bicycle.
ATL720 is offline  
Old 07-29-23, 08:56 AM
  #8  
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 30,058

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Liked 1,606 Times in 1,084 Posts
Originally Posted by ATL720
I always wondered why there weren't more (or any) bikes in zombie apocalypse movies. Everyone's driving cars like nothing changed. Can't think of any that feature a bicycle.
Bicycles aren't "featured" in the 1982 movie Blade Runner, but I remember that they made an appearance in some of the street scenes of an LA in the future.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 08-02-23, 05:55 AM
  #9  
Ride more, eat less
 
cat0020's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Philla PA, Hoboken NJ, Brooklyn NY
Posts: 2,116

Bikes: Too many but never enough.

Liked 782 Times in 480 Posts
Something like this for the "heavy load"

https://electrek.co/2023/07/18/briti...ket-launchers/

cat0020 is offline  
Old 03-08-24, 02:01 AM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 2,715
Liked 691 Times in 551 Posts
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
This bike that I had in Kandahar was nothing special but did have a neat logo.


Oysh. S&W has branded and sold all kinds of consumer goods they don't actually make, which is a shame, because their revolvers, at least when I sampled some in the 1980s, were fantastic quality, so this is real brand dilution. How good a bike can that be, with a one-piece steel ashtabula crank, horizontal dropouts (to compensate for poor frame alignment in manufacturing), and most probably a claw-mount rear derailleur on the other side? Walmart quality in a battle zone. Well at least, no big loss if stolen or left behind in a bugout.
Duragrouch is online now  
Old 03-08-24, 08:54 AM
  #11  
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 30,058

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Liked 1,606 Times in 1,084 Posts
Originally Posted by Duragrouch
How good a bike can that be, with a one-piece steel ashtabula crank, horizontal dropouts (to compensate for poor frame alignment in manufacturing), and most probably a claw-mount rear derailleur on the other side? Walmart quality in a battle zone. Well at least, no big loss if stolen or left behind in a bugout.
Good enough!

A utility bike needs to be available and good enough to get around, priced right (free) and have no need for LBS provenance or bragging rights. These available bikes served me well with no fuss or muss while working on large bases in Iraq and Afghanistan.



I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 03-08-24, 09:14 AM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2023
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 749
Liked 359 Times in 233 Posts
This dude gets it. We could debate the specific merits of his bike, but if the zombie apocalypse hit, a bike is the best mode of transportation. Cars and trucks rely to a large extent on roads, bridges, and fuel. They are generally stopped by traffic, roadblocks, or electromagnetic attacks.

A bike, on the other hand, can be lashed on your vehicle and cannot readily be stopped, even if the vehicle is. The bike can even be carried through water, lifted over obstacles, rafted downriver, etc.
ScottCommutes is offline  
Likes For ScottCommutes:
Old 03-09-24, 03:35 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 2,715
Liked 691 Times in 551 Posts
Yeah... sorta. I agree that a bike is great for emergency situations. And I agree that in a war zone, where things could get stolen, need to be left behind, etc, and not needing to bike far, a cheap bike is the way to go. But it's completely contrary to the philosophy of every piece of military equipment, which is durability and function when it counts. If I have to traverse a long area in an emergency, I want a bike that won't let me down. Now, doesn't need to be a handmade boutique tourer, but not walmart quality either; Needs good quality frame, notably with good dropouts and not very thin and just crimped or spot welded in place, and good quality parts.
Duragrouch is online now  
Old 03-09-24, 09:57 AM
  #14  
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 30,058

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Liked 1,606 Times in 1,084 Posts
Originally Posted by Duragrouch
Yeah... sorta. I agree that a bike is great for emergency situations. And I agree that in a war zone, where things could get stolen, need to be left behind, etc, and not needing to bike far, a cheap bike is the way to go. But it's completely contrary to the philosophy of every piece of military equipment, which is durability and function when it counts. If I have to traverse a long area in an emergency, I want a bike that won't let me down. Now, doesn't need to be a handmade boutique tourer, but not walmart quality either; Needs good quality frame, notably with good dropouts and not very thin and just crimped or spot welded in place, and good quality parts.
The most recent successful use of bicycles in military operations has been for carrying cargo by troops/porters through extremely difficult terrain, specifically the Japanese in the Malay Peninsula in WW2, and the Vietnamese post WW2.

Heavy duty cargo carrying capability and availability (including whatever bicycles could be stolen from the civilian populations in occupied countries in the case of European WW2 operations) was probably the primary philosophy in selecting bicycle equipment for military use for the past 80 years. Pictures are extracted from The Military History of The Bicycle by John Norris
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 06-10-24, 09:26 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Velo Mule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 2,176

Bikes: Trek 800 x 2, Schwinn Heavy Duti, Schwinn Traveler, Schwinn Le Tour Luxe, Schwinn Continental, Cannondale M400 and Lambert, Schwinn Super Sport

Liked 1,071 Times in 697 Posts
Look no further that what the Vietnamese were capable of moving with their bikes in war time.
Velo Mule is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.