Utility Cycling Want to haul groceries, beer, maybe even your kids? You don't have to live car free to put your bike to use as a workhorse. Here's the place to share and learn about the bicycle as a utility vehicle.

How to carry.....

Reply

Old 06-29-08, 10:26 AM
  #1  
girljen
Nerd
Thread Starter
 
girljen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Wheat Ridge, CO
Posts: 450

Bikes: K2 T-9 Crosswind

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
How to carry.....

I'm a n00b.

I have a few questions about things I'd like to carry, or may want to carry in the future. So please let me know...how do you carry these things? Or how would you carry them if you had to?

Multiple large glass bottles?

A hot meal?

Yard tools with long handles?

Wholesale-size boxes of paper towels/TP/trash bags/etc.?

A cat?

A load of laundry?

A keg?
girljen is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 10:50 AM
  #2  
dwnptrl_777
Señor Member
 
dwnptrl_777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Midwest USA
Posts: 547

Bikes: Ti Fatback

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
One answer covers 'em all, girljen: Surly Big Dummy.
__________________
......_ .
O/---\/O
dwnptrl_777 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 10:55 AM
  #3  
Newspaperguy
Senior Member
 
Newspaperguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 2,206
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
For glass bottles, I'd use panniers. Put clothing or rags between the bottles to keep them from clanging together too much.

For yard tools with long handles, Strap the business end of the tool on the rear rack and fasten the handle to the top tube. I wouldn't want to take more than one or two tools this way, but it can work.

Big boxes may take some creative fiddling to put them on the rear rack. Once they're fastened, go slowly. A trailer would be a better solution.

For laundry, put the load in a hockey equipment bag and carry it on your back as if it were a backpack. Laundry is bulky, not heavy.

If you think you'll take loads like these on a regular basis, you should look into getting or building a trailer.
Newspaperguy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 11:00 AM
  #4  
ken cummings
Senior Member
 
ken cummings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: northern California
Posts: 5,603

Bikes: Bruce Gordon BLT, Cannondale parts bike, Ecodyne recumbent trike, Counterpoint Opus 2, miyata 1000

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Originally Posted by girljen View Post
I'm a n00b.

I have a few questions about things I'd like to carry, or may want to carry in the future. So please let me know...how do you carry these things? Or how would you carry them if you had to?

Multiple large glass bottles?

purpose-built rigid foam boxes with cavities that just fit the bottles. We hve them around here for different sizes of wine bottles. Then just stuff the boxes in panniers.

A hot meal?

Insulated bags like Pizza delivery people use. In panniers, on a rear rack, or in a trailer. Depends on size of meal.

Yard tools with long handles?

I've seen this one in southern California. Gardeners bolted plastic pipes to their bike racks with the bottom end capped. On trailers too.

Wholesale-size boxes of paper towels/TP/trash bags/etc.?

Trailers, either baskets big enough or flat-bed trailers.

A cat? In a sound-proofed cat carrier in a basket type trailer.

A load of laundry? In a trailer.

A keg?
I've seen this one here. In a reinforced trailer.
ken cummings is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 11:47 AM
  #5  
StephenH
Uber Goober
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Posts: 11,622
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 146 Post(s)
The key is to have 8 different bicycles. Or one bike and a couple of trailers. But specifically:

Multiple large glass bottles? Big baskets, big trailer, front-loading trike

A hot meal? Worksman Pizza bicycle with insulated pizza box (beware the bumps)

Yard tools with long handles? One of the longish trailers. Or a front-loading tricycle.

Wholesale-size boxes of paper towels/TP/trash bags/etc.? Trailer or front-loading tricycle.

A cat? A leash, basket, cage, trailer, whatever.

A load of laundry? Front loading trike or big trailer

A keg? Front loading trike or big trailer.
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 12:03 PM
  #6  
HSean
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 1,143

Bikes: Many. Ralieigh sports`s, Raleigh Superbe, sears Spaceliner, Firestone supercruisers, many vintage mountain bikes, random cruisers, and other unique bikes.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
.

I'd think one of these is best, this ones mine, you can put whatever you want on them, I have diffornt attachments for mine.

HSean is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 12:17 PM
  #7  
coldfeet
Senior Member
 
coldfeet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,118
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by dwnptrl_777 View Post
One answer covers 'em all, girljen: Surly Big Dummy.
Or an Xtracycle on strong MTB if moneys tight. Get the wideloaders and Longloader attatchments.
A biggish trailer would also do it.
coldfeet is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 01:00 PM
  #8  
Maxwell
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 178
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
A hot meal?
I think front baskets work best for transporting take-out. If the food is in sturdy containers like chinese food boxes, anything will do. If it's in something that pops open easily, like styrofoam, a basket is best.

Yard tools with long handles?
The suggestion of strapping them to the top tube with the ends on the rack could work. On my big dummy, I've strapped them to the deck with the handles pointing back.

Wholesale-size boxes of paper towels/TP/trash bags/etc.?
TP doesn't weigh much, so you can strap it all sorts of ways. A costco sized pack goes perfectly on the top of an xtracycle snapdeck. On a smaller bike, if going for the jumbo pack, I'd strap it on the rear rack sideways, with the ends hopefully supported by panniers or baskets.

A cat?
Cat carrier secured into a front basket or on a rear rack would probably work best.

A keg?
A full keg is probably gonna require a two wheel trailer unless you've got a bakfietsen or cargo trike or something. those skinny corny kegs go great on an xtra though. http://www.surlybikes.com/bigdummy.html Notice the guy on the left.

Last edited by Maxwell; 06-29-08 at 01:01 PM. Reason: typo
Maxwell is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 01:27 PM
  #9  
Allen
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,757
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Originally Posted by girljen View Post
I'm a n00b.

I have a few questions about things I'd like to carry, or may want to carry in the future. So please let me know...how do you carry these things? Or how would you carry them if you had to?

Multiple large glass bottles?
1.) wrap them in a towel
or if they need to be cold
2.) I use h2o proof panniers--place the bottles in the pannier and pour a bag of ice on top of them. The ice keeps everything stable.

Originally Posted by Jen
A hot meal?


Originally Posted by jen
Yard tools with long handles?


Originally Posted by Jen
Wholesale-size boxes of paper towels/TP/trash bags/etc.?

Or use a trailer

Originally Posted by Jen
A cat?
Donna has a good thing for carrying cats.
I would use:


Originally Posted by Jen
A load of laundry?

Plus


Originally Posted by Jen
A keg?
Allen is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 04:14 PM
  #10  
StephenH
Uber Goober
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Posts: 11,622
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 146 Post(s)
That's a cute little trailer!

What are the legalities of that? Is there an open-keg law for cyclists?
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 04:33 PM
  #11  
donnamb 
tired
 
donnamb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 5,653

Bikes: Breezer Uptown 8, U frame

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A cat.

__________________
"Real wars of words are harder to win. They require thought, insight, precision, articulation, knowledge, and experience. They require the humility to admit when you are wrong. They recognize that the dialectic is not about making us look at you, but about us all looking together for the truth."
donnamb is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 05:16 PM
  #12  
CommuterRun
Conservative Hippie
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Wakulla Co. FL
Posts: 4,271
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've carried everything on your list except the cat and the keg on my Burley Flatbed.

Cats just don't feel comfortable on a bicycle, it doesn't matter how much duct tape you use.
CommuterRun is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 06:27 PM
  #13  
Sirrus Rider
Velocommuter Commando
 
Sirrus Rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 2,646

Bikes: '88 Specialized Sirrus, '89 Alpine Monitor Pass, two '70 Raligh Twenties, '07 Schwinn Town & Country Trike, '07 Specialized Sirrus Hybrid

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Originally Posted by dwnptrl_777 View Post
One answer covers 'em all, girljen: Surly Big Dummy.
I don't disagree; however, not everyone can drop $899 to $1800 for a SBD. [sigh] Some of us have to dance with what we brung.
Sirrus Rider is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 08:09 PM
  #14  
crazybikerchick
Senior Member
 
crazybikerchick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: the Georgia Strait
Posts: 961

Bikes: Devinci Caribou, Kona Dew Plus, Raleigh Twenty

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by girljen View Post
I'm a n00b.

I have a few questions about things I'd like to carry, or may want to carry in the future. So please let me know...how do you carry these things? Or how would you carry them if you had to?

Multiple large glass bottles?

A hot meal?

Yard tools with long handles?

Wholesale-size boxes of paper towels/TP/trash bags/etc.?

A cat?

A load of laundry?

A keg?
I have a homemade trailer made using a bent metal conduit frame around a large rubbermaid tote that would work for most of those items. Cat in cat carrier inside tote. You obviously don't want the cat in anything open since the cat is likely to get freaked out by being on the bike and bolt.

For yard tools with long handles the best I've seen is a long cargo trailer that specifically has holes for putting garden tools on it sitting upright. You might be able to carefully tie one to your top tube if this is an infrequent item. In fact I want to buy 10' piece of trim tomorrow and am going to try to do this by tying it to the bike.

For a hot meal, how far are you carrying it and does it have to be still hot when you get where you are going? (and how extreme is the weather?) I've taken chili to work before for a potluck in a big bowl inside a milk crate bungeed to my rack. I could rewarm it there though.

Large glass bottles, depending on how big and how many you could also divide them up between baskets, panniers, crate on a rack, backpack etc.

Two large panniers should hold a load of laundry.
crazybikerchick is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-08, 09:50 PM
  #15  
StephenH
Uber Goober
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Posts: 11,622
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 146 Post(s)
Actually, this looks to be the ultimate for carrying laundry, especially large quantities:
http://www.huskybicycles.com/Merchan...roduct_Count=7
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-08, 09:12 AM
  #16  
Sammyboy
The Legitimiser
 
Sammyboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Southampton, UK
Posts: 4,846

Bikes: Gazelle Trim Trophy, EG Bates Track Bike, HR Bates Cantiflex bike, Nigel Dean fixed gear conversion, Raleigh Royal, Falcon Westminster.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Pretty much all of those things can be done with this:



But day to day riding is perhaps not ideal in a 3 speed cargo trike that weighs about the same as your house....
Sammyboy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-08, 10:36 AM
  #17  
crackerdog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Port Townsend, WA
Posts: 982

Bikes: xtracycle, electric recumbent, downtube folder and more

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So, girljen, what kind of bike are you using now? I use a Bikes-at-Work(BAW) trailer and could easily carry all that at once. I use it to carry construction stuff around.
crackerdog is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-08, 11:44 AM
  #18  
MichaelW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Posts: 12,952
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
You can get utility bike specially designed to carry large loads but if you have a regular hybrid/urban/3-speed/tourer whatever you can still carry most fo that stuff.

Bottles: any large pannier with good stiffening board will work. I used to do the bottle run with 2 carradice panniers packed to the gills with glass.
Hot meal: A front basket is probably your best bet; I prefer wicker ones to metal. You can easily fiond a polystyrene box to insulate your takaway.

Tools: Tied to the top tube/rack with business end to the rar. Tie a red rag on any overhand and ensure free steering and braking. Watch out for paint damage.
Big, lightweight packs: I strap these on top of the rack with bunries, chord or old inner tubes. When carring heavier bulk items (bags of cement) i sometimes need better suppoert so I have a short plank with some holes drilled in. I wire the plank sideways on the rack and ties the load on.
Cat: No experience with feline livestock but you can acclimatise them to bags or baskets. If your cat is anything like my dog and you have trained it to sit, stand, lay down, fetch and
stay, then bike training will be easy.
Laundry. 2 large panniers (with darw-chord extension for over-filling) can carry a weeks-worth of stuff. You can carry more in a stuff sac on the rack.
A keg is the only thing that a basic bike can't take. Trailers are probably your best answer although I did see a recumbent specially designed to carry one under the seat. There is a design for a bamboo trailer which is very strong but needs no welding.
MichaelW is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-08, 01:05 PM
  #19  
crazybikerchick
Senior Member
 
crazybikerchick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: the Georgia Strait
Posts: 961

Bikes: Devinci Caribou, Kona Dew Plus, Raleigh Twenty

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by MichaelW View Post
A keg is the only thing that a basic bike can't take. Trailers are probably your best answer although I did see a recumbent specially designed to carry one under the seat. There is a design for a bamboo trailer which is very strong but needs no welding.
You might be able to rig something up with a bundle buggy and some bungee cords if you don't have a trailer. Its all a matter of creativity and making do with what you have. Scrap metal collectors I often see pushing a grocery shopping cart of metal in one hand with the other on their bicycle.
crazybikerchick is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-08, 01:40 PM
  #20  
girljen
Nerd
Thread Starter
 
girljen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Wheat Ridge, CO
Posts: 450

Bikes: K2 T-9 Crosswind

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have a K2 T-Nine Crosswind, an aluminum hybrid bike from REI. I have a Bell child trailer, which is usually filled with 25 lbs. of toddler, which cuts down my towing capacity to 75 lbs.

Thanks for all the cool suggestions so far!
girljen is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-08, 09:19 PM
  #21  
Sianelle 
Sister Annie
 
Sianelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Hauraki Plains District, New Zealand
Posts: 1,519

Bikes: Retro Hercules adult tricycle, 1953 Hercules ladies roadster, 1950s Wearwell fixed gear 'Club' pathracer, 1980s Malvern Star 'Super Star', 1980s Healing GTX-105 Arabesque, 1980's Morrison Concorde & etc & etc.......

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
My cat absolutely hates being taken anywhere in a car, but enjoys travelling in a carrying cage on the back tray of my utility tricycle.
__________________
OMNIPOTENS aeterne Deus, qui nos secundum imaginem Tuam plasmasti, et omnia bona, vera, pulchra, praesertim in divina persona Unigeniti Filii Tui Domini nostri Iesu Christi, quaerere iussisti, praesta quaesumus ut, per intercessionem Sancti Isidori, Episcopi et Doctoris, in peregrinationibus per interrete factis et manus oculosque ad quae Tibi sunt placita intendamus et omnes quos convenimus cum caritate ac patientia accipiamus. Per Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.
Sianelle is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-08, 11:36 PM
  #22  
Michel Gagnon
Year-round cyclist
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Montréal (Québec)
Posts: 3,023
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't have cats and I don't deal with them. For the rest :

– Bottles : tightly packed together and upright. Either in a box with cardboard separators (ex.: box of Mason jars) or with a towel between them. If I were travelling long distances on a bumpy road, I might put a foam or old towel underneath to cushion them.
Transportation would either be in panniers or in a trailer depending on what I have. Though if by trailer, I would need some decent weight (i.e. filled bottles or other stuff) to prevent the trailer from flying in potholes.

– Hot meal : For one or a family: thermos. For a group: either the milk crate or the trailer with the pot in it. The challenge is to find tight containers or to find ways to prevent the soup from making waves out of the pot. Been there, done that, when feeding groups of 30-40 people at church.

– Yard tools : If I have the trailer, that's where they go, tool end in the trailer and handle on top of the rear rack. Otherwise, I will wrap the tool end to safeguard my panniers, put it in the pannier, zip it in a way that keeps the handlebar upright and use one or two straps to secure it in place. I often did the same with plans that were rolled in a 4-ft or 5-ft roll.

– Wholesale-size boxes: In the case of garbage bags, it would fit in my panniers. Other heavy stuff would fit in too. As for paper tissues, toilet paper... it's usually fairly easy to strap sideways onto the rack. The load is kept upright onto the rack and panniers, and even when I shopped far away from home, I never had to re-tighten the load. If I have the trailer, it will typically go either onto the rack or on top of the trailer: when I carry such loads, it's usually on a day I also shop for lots of non perishables, so panniers and trailer are likely to be full with more dense stuff.

– Laundry: I have done it either in the trailer or in panniers. Trailer is much easier.

– Keg: Haven't done it, but see soup above.
Michel Gagnon is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-08, 09:45 PM
  #23  
surfimp
Hired geek
 
surfimp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Posts: 197
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by CommuterRun View Post
Cats just don't feel comfortable on a bicycle, it doesn't matter how much duct tape you use.
Now that's classic!

I recommend an Xtracycle and possibly a flatbed trailer for all of the above. Or a Big Dummy, if you can find one and pony up the cost (up to > $1k just for the frame now, per the Surly Blog).

Steve
surfimp is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service