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Transporting delicate goods with a cargo bike (no trailer)

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Transporting delicate goods with a cargo bike (no trailer)

Old 09-14-10, 07:56 AM
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Transporting delicate goods with a cargo bike (no trailer)

Eggs, carbonated bevies (esp those in glass), easily-bruised fruit, etc.

Do you take any extra precautions other than packing like a professional bag boy/girl and attempting to avoid bumpy roads?
Are there any groceries that you absolutely take the car to haul? E.g. I've never risked hauling $nooty beer on the bike.
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Old 09-14-10, 04:01 PM
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for eggs...

i always carry a jacket or sweater on my bike because i live near the water and the temperature tends to fluctuate a lot. when i get eggs, i wrap the carton in the sweater and then put it in the cargo bags like that.

for beer, i have never had a problem just putting them in the cargo bags in the 6 pack carrier or whatever. roads are pretty rough around here and i've never had a broken bottle. also, see beer delivery trucks on the road pretty often and they don't look like too soft of a ride, so i don't think the bumps are too much to worry about.

generally, if i am going to take some fragile i will just try to wrap it up and something soft and then secure it so it can't move around.
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Old 09-14-10, 04:48 PM
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i find cars are no better for carrying delicate stuff than a bike unless your car has really wide tires or shocks that are practically dead. bumps in the road are bumps in the road no matter what you drive.
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Old 09-14-10, 06:53 PM
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Had no problem with eggs or beer ( 6 pack bottle ) Well, if the ride is more than 15 minutes, you might want to let the beer settle, or it can get a bit "lively" when you open it.
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Old 09-14-10, 10:38 PM
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I haven't had any problems with beer, eggs, or watermelons. The only problems I have is with ripe tomatoes and ripe fruit from the farmer's market- they tend to bruise on my 6 1/2 mile commute. They do a bit better if I place them on a jacket in my arkel shopper pannier.
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Old 09-15-10, 03:14 PM
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I don't have a cargo bike. I use a trailer.
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Old 09-16-10, 01:54 AM
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I often have some rubbermaid tubs on my cargo bike (actually, Sterilite, and not quite as big). I can fit four in my XC freeloaders if I stack them vertically. I also ride with a handlebar bag, in case I run out of room in the tubs (eggs, bread, light bulbs often end up in the barbag). I find bread, eggs, light bulbs, lettuce, pie, cakes...almost necessitate getting a tub to themselves unless I can work is so they sit on top of heavier goods (solid veggies, cans) when I setup the tubs in the freeloader bags. Bottles of wine and olive oil are almost the same concern--if I'm packing like 4 glass bottles, I make sure to try and wrap a few of them in a shirt or canvas bags or wedge extra veggie bags around them so they don't strike each other (and I pack them forward a bunch).

Last weekend I did a run to Trader Joes and came back with 4 750ml bottles of wine, 4 1L bottles of mineral water, 4 large cans of crushed tomatoes, a dozen eggs, and a bunch of veggies. I had to place the wine bottles between the plastic water bottles so they don't strike--and the only place left for the eggs was my handlebar bag. I guess I coulda bungied my eggs to the snapdeck, but....eh.
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Old 09-16-10, 11:00 AM
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I don't see all the fuss. It's very simple. Suspension prevents damage.

Get an elastic cargo net and place it loosely over your plastic box. Load the fragile stuff on the cargo net, then cover with another cargo net. Use clips or hooks to secure the edges of the cargo net to the box rim. Now the fragile stuff can bounce up and down while you ride down the road.

:)ensen.
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Old 09-16-10, 11:07 AM
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you could just get some soft foam to put your stuff on or pack it in.
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Old 09-16-10, 01:28 PM
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Easily bruised fruit usually gets wrapped up and/or put on my person rather than the bike. Never had a problem with transporting beer in any of trailer, pannier or fold-out rack basket, or milk crate on one rack. Eggs the carton is fairly protective and if you can pack around soft items the better. Being car-free there is no other option for delicate goods. When I lived in Toronto though I guess I did use a taxi for mirror glass. And public transport for mat board. Both could probably be done on the bike but sometimes its too much hassle.
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Old 09-18-10, 12:31 AM
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Originally Posted by purplepeople
Get an elastic cargo net and place it loosely over your plastic box. Load the fragile stuff on the cargo net, then cover with another cargo net. Use clips or hooks to secure the edges of the cargo net to the box rim. Now the fragile stuff can bounce up and down while you ride down the road.
That's a good tip, thanks.

When shopping with the burley bee trailer, I hang my canvas bags with carabiner clips from the top of the trailer frame to keep the bags from spilling out. The bags that I hang on the top-most of the bag stack end up being the bags with lettuce and eggs, etc.
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Old 09-24-10, 02:15 PM
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I haven't had a problem.
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