Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Utility Cycling
Reload this Page >

Building/modifying a reverse trike. Suggestions or words of wisdom?

Notices
Utility Cycling Want to haul groceries, beer, maybe even your kids? You don't have to live car free to put your bike to use as a workhorse. Here's the place to share and learn about the bicycle as a utility vehicle.

Building/modifying a reverse trike. Suggestions or words of wisdom?

Old 01-27-11, 03:40 PM
  #1  
kazpaacykel
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
kazpaacykel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Tempe, Arizona
Posts: 13

Bikes: KHS Flite 100, refurbished Schwinn Varsity

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Building/modifying a reverse trike. Suggestions or words of wisdom?

I'm a newbie in the bike construction thing, but have decided I'd like to design a certain kind of bike that I had the fun of learning to use when living in Copenhagen, Denmark. The bike, routinely called a "Christiania Bike", are a whole lot like a utility trike, but is essentially flipped the other way, with the two wheels and a large (often painted wood) box in the front. A quick google search for "Christiania bike" will yield quite a few photos of what I'm talking about.

I haven't found any reasonably priced options in my region of the US, and it seems like the design hasn't especially caught on here. Hence, the decision to build it. It'd be helpful to have a skeleton frame to build off of, but it seems more and more like I may need to make some trips to the scrap yard and hack up some old frames and do quite a bit of welding to make this happen. Any words of wisdom?
kazpaacykel is offline  
Old 01-27-11, 05:42 PM
  #2  
Nightshade
Humvee of bikes =Worksman
 
Nightshade's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 5,362
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Easy mate! You CAN buy an American made trike exactly like you want ,for less than you could build one, and it will be strong as a tank......

https://worksmancycles.com/shopsite_s...frontload.html
__________________
My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
Nightshade is offline  
Old 02-08-11, 01:21 PM
  #3  
Ya Tu Sabes
Rebel Thousandaire
 
Ya Tu Sabes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Hartford, CT
Posts: 733

Bikes: Public D8, Yuba Mundo (cargo), Novara Buzz (1-speed, soon to be 2-speed w/ a kickback hub), Xootr 1-speed folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I can vouch for the Worksman front loaders - I have an S.U.D., and I swapped out the metal box for a grocery cart (without the bottom part and the wheels). It is not winning any races, but with a 3-speed coaster brake wheel on the back, I take it all over town, sometimes with groceries, sometimes with my 4-year-old and my 6-year-old inside. Here it is in action:
Ya Tu Sabes is offline  
Old 02-08-11, 02:40 PM
  #4  
AdamDZ
Bike addict, dreamer
 
AdamDZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Queens, New York
Posts: 5,165
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
How do those ride considering you have to move/turn the entire loaded part of the bike, rather than just a wheel, to turn? A trike with fat, studded tires would make a great winter bike, it seems.
AdamDZ is offline  
Old 02-08-11, 04:18 PM
  #5  
StephenH
Uber Goober
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Posts: 11,759
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 190 Post(s)
Liked 39 Times in 30 Posts
Originally Posted by AdamDZ View Post
How do those ride considering you have to move/turn the entire loaded part of the bike, rather than just a wheel, to turn? A trike with fat, studded tires would make a great winter bike, it seems.
I got to try mine out in the wintery weather here. Only the rear wheel is powered. So riding on level ice, no problem. Riding in 6" of loose snow, problem. Uphill on ice, problem. Would depend on the weight on front, too.

Kaz, I think you posted this question in "Introductions" a while back? If you like, I can run out and photograph the underside of my Worksman. You won't necessarily find the parts for one in a hardware store or a scrap yard, and as pointed out earlier, the Mexican cargo trike would be easier to home-build using bicycle parts.

I think some of the European trikes also have front wheels that pivot separately, which is altogether different from the Worksman design.

Interesting website: https://www.tucsonbikelawyer.com/
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline  
Old 02-08-11, 05:22 PM
  #6  
HandsomeRyan
Pants are for suckaz
 
HandsomeRyan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Mt. Airy, MD
Posts: 2,578

Bikes: Hardtail MTB, Fixed gear, and Commuter bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Don't make one like this. It didn't work.



HandsomeRyan is offline  
Old 02-08-11, 06:42 PM
  #7  
AdamDZ
Bike addict, dreamer
 
AdamDZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Queens, New York
Posts: 5,165
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
I got to try mine out in the wintery weather here. Only the rear wheel is powered. So riding on level ice, no problem. Riding in 6" of loose snow, problem. Uphill on ice, problem. Would depend on the weight on front, too.

Kaz, I think you posted this question in "Introductions" a while back? If you like, I can run out and photograph the underside of my Worksman. You won't necessarily find the parts for one in a hardware store or a scrap yard, and as pointed out earlier, the Mexican cargo trike would be easier to home-build using bicycle parts.

I think some of the European trikes also have front wheels that pivot separately, which is altogether different from the Worksman design.

Interesting website: https://www.tucsonbikelawyer.com/
So regular trike with two rear wheels might be better. It does make sense though.
AdamDZ is offline  
Old 02-08-11, 09:17 PM
  #8  
StephenH
Uber Goober
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Posts: 11,759
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 190 Post(s)
Liked 39 Times in 30 Posts
Ice on the trail (not snow, ice, hear it crunching)- no problem:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EgbIG1FUB2o
Light snow on the road- no problem:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jA_I6jH7DY8
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline  
Old 02-09-11, 06:49 AM
  #9  
AdamDZ
Bike addict, dreamer
 
AdamDZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Queens, New York
Posts: 5,165
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I ride with studded tires and have little problems too. But as a utility bike to go shopping, do laundry, etc. a trike might be beneficial in Winter.
AdamDZ is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
farzad
Framebuilders
2
09-04-17 01:19 PM
geo8rge
General Cycling Discussion
6
04-24-17 06:10 AM
Weakling
Recumbent
2
09-18-12 08:06 AM
Ya Tu Sabes
Utility Cycling
1
11-29-10 12:47 PM
wanatrike
Utility Cycling
14
12-10-09 09:11 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.