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Me hauling groceries... this already sucks.

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Me hauling groceries... this already sucks.

Old 04-21-11, 06:54 PM
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Me hauling groceries... this already sucks.



This sucks because
  1. It's unstable (I lost the cheese, stopped five feet later and went back to get it)
  2. It's not spill resistant (I fall over sometimes; what? I can't ride a bike)
  3. Specific carry capacity/composition (too little, too much, not of certain sizes/densities, etc, and I can lose stuff)

Suggestions?
I'm thinking I'll ditch that basket and find something that can carry milk and eggs and such. I haven't worked out what, though. I wonder how panniers do for carrying groceries; alternately, side baskets:



Looks to me like I could set the bento box horizontally atop this and bungee cord it down. However, it replaces the entire rear rack, and I don't know if that would preclude panniers. Also I'm wondering if panniers would actually be more convenient.



(I quite like these at a glance, but I can't find these exact ones to see if they're waterproof or anything... lots of other good ones I like though)

Some of these don't seem to preclude strapping my Bento Box down to it when I'm carrying it with lunch, or a Thermos lunch pail if I could ever get something like that (forget the post-1980 rectangular crap, dome top is better).
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Old 04-21-11, 07:28 PM
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Keep the basket and throw a net over it. Always have a pair of panniers to use whenever needed.
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Old 04-21-11, 08:31 PM
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I have a Topeak rear basket that I use for errands. I keep a dry bag in it for mail along with a cable lock. When I get groceries I set them on top of or next to that stuff.

I never really thought about it, but I think the dry bag (empty or not) and cable lock cushions and stabilizes the grocery load. I've never had an issue with things bouncing out, but I do take it pretty easy over tracks and such.

I think the net is a good idea too.
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Old 04-22-11, 05:04 AM
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Here is a picture of a beer run. I use folding baskets in the back and a regular basket in the front. I also have panniers mounted on a different bike. I love the cargo nets with the baskets and also use them to hold things to the racks when using the bike with panniers. I have had the big saddle baskets in the past and they are great for tossing things like backpacks in and going.

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Old 04-22-11, 07:08 AM
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bluefoxicy, the most economical option would be for you to keep your baskets and invest in a couple of these insulated shopping bags with zipper closures. They only cost about $3 a piece at most markets and of course have the added advantage of keeping that cheese from going all runny in the summer.



If you ever decide to go really hard core though, a cargo or shopping trailer might just fit the bill for you. Won't affect the way your bike handles so maybe you wouldn't fall so much. And you could schlepp a whole lot more too.
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Old 04-22-11, 07:11 AM
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Originally Posted by travelmama
Keep the basket and throw a net over it. Always have a pair of panniers to use whenever needed.
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Old 04-22-11, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by wahoonc
Party at your house!!
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Old 04-22-11, 12:48 PM
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Wald makes bags that fit their folding baskets:
https://www.waldsports.com/index.cfm/...ingbasket.html

Banjo Brothers makes panniers (open top "Grocery" model, or closet top "Market") that are great for food shopping:
https://www.banjobrothers.com/products/panniers/

In either case, you bring the bag into the store, load it up, put it back on your bike, and go. Couldn't be simpler.
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Old 04-22-11, 04:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Roll-Monroe-Co
Party at your house!!
Every weekend Just glad the local market A) can now sell beer and B) carries something I will drink!

Aaron
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Old 04-22-11, 04:49 PM
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Lower centre of gravity is better for stability, so panniers would work better than an over-the-wheel basket. I use a trailer when going grocery shopping, which has an even lower center of gravity, and allows me to haul massive quantities. It also has a cover to keep things from getting wet if it rains.
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Old 04-22-11, 07:01 PM
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The Wald folding panniers baskets work well for a lot of people and of course I'm fond of trailers because i make them.
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Old 04-23-11, 11:49 AM
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Originally Posted by sauerwald
Lower centre of gravity is better for stability
A bike is an inverted pendulum, which means a higher center of gravity makes it easier to keep upright when moving, but harder to keep stable when not moving at a particular speed. Below speed, the bicycle is hard to keep up, i.e for track stands.
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Old 04-23-11, 12:49 PM
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Another helpful thing to do is to get the weight as far forward on that basket as you can-- with everything all the way back, you're adding to both instability and the amount of jarring and vibration your cargo undergoes. Keep at it!
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Old 04-23-11, 07:42 PM
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The Pannier thing seems interesting, any thoughts on how much storage is decent? 24L (= 6.3 gal, = 1465 cu in, = 0.847 cu ft) Timbuk2 Tandem panniers:

https://www.rei.com/product/811081/ti...anniers-medium

vs 47L (= 12.4 gal, = 2868 cu in, = 1.65 cu ft) Vaude Roadmaster:

https://www.bikebagshop.com/vaude-roa...rs-p-1118.html

or some other such thing.

The small 24L set doesn't seem to bad, since that's a dozen 2L bottles essentially, which ... is a lot. 47L is a staggering amount of space (I have a 10 gallon brew kettle, that's a lot of storage to carry around!).

EDIT: Hmm, cheaper than Timbuk 2, the Avenir Excursion small (24L)/large (27L) sets...

https://www.amazon.com/Avenir-Excursi...dp/B00165Q4RG/
https://www.amazon.com/Avenir-Excursi...dp/B00165Q4QM/

Last edited by bluefoxicy; 04-23-11 at 08:07 PM.
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Old 04-24-11, 12:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Doohickie
net wudve done the trick
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Old 04-24-11, 01:27 PM
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My favorites for general shopping, including groceries, are REI's grocery panniers. I also have a set of the big-box-store Schwinn panniers that I use when I'm out riding and *might* pick something up. These are also good for stashing layers as the layers come off.
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Old 04-24-11, 01:35 PM
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one word----Xtracycle.
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Old 04-25-11, 09:11 AM
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I'd really recommend looking at a "market" type pannier, instead of a touring type, if you really want something easy to use for daily utility cycling. (They are usually cheaper, too.)

Ecovelo has some good posts on this:

https://www.ecovelo.info/2010/06/18/t...s-best-friend/

https://www.ecovelo.info/2009/08/05/b...arket-pannier/

Most models are square-ish, to better accommodate the shape of grocery bags and boxes that things cone in, and many fold up to stay out of the way when not in use. They are also very easy handle off the bike when loaded - they have top handles, shoulder straps, etc. Touring panniers can be very rounded, which is inefficient to load with groceries. and are optimized to keep stuff secure and dry on long tours, so they may not work so well with a loaf of bread sticking out the top!

As far as capacity, the best way to visiualize it is that market panniers/baskets are usually sized to hold a standard brown paper grocery bag. That is the conventional "unit" of measurement The "# of 2-liter bottles" method can be deceiving...

Originally Posted by bluefoxicy
The Pannier thing seems interesting, any thoughts on how much storage is decent? 24L (= 6.3 gal, = 1465 cu in, = 0.847 cu ft) Timbuk2 Tandem panniers:

https://www.rei.com/product/811081/ti...anniers-medium

vs 47L (= 12.4 gal, = 2868 cu in, = 1.65 cu ft) Vaude Roadmaster:

https://www.bikebagshop.com/vaude-roa...rs-p-1118.html

or some other such thing.

The small 24L set doesn't seem to bad, since that's a dozen 2L bottles essentially, which ... is a lot. 47L is a staggering amount of space (I have a 10 gallon brew kettle, that's a lot of storage to carry around!).

EDIT: Hmm, cheaper than Timbuk 2, the Avenir Excursion small (24L)/large (27L) sets...

https://www.amazon.com/Avenir-Excursi...dp/B00165Q4RG/
https://www.amazon.com/Avenir-Excursi...dp/B00165Q4QM/
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Old 04-25-11, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Rockfish
Touring panniers can be very rounded, which is inefficient to load with groceries. and are optimized to keep stuff secure and dry on long tours, so they may not work so well with a loaf of bread sticking out the top!
Yes but what happens when you have a store 8 miles west of you, 16 miles north, 9 miles east, and you go in a 47 mile circuit from store to store?

Hmm, also I need to figure out a way to lock the things, and lock them to my bike... otherwise hobos will steal my groceries. (Hobos are a real problem here; but while you can blame people for stealing food when they're hungry, you can't really expect any better. I mean come on, they're poor and starving! I've had 'em follow me into the store and try to get me to shop for them!)
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Old 04-25-11, 06:15 PM
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Me hauling groceries

42Kg, 58KM round trip. You will get the hang of it. Keep trying, keep smiling
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Old 04-27-11, 12:40 AM
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Yet another vote for a net. I use one with my rear basket for grocery shopping on way home from work.
It just rocks. I keep it wound around my seatpost when not in use. Saved the day so many times.
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Old 04-27-11, 03:35 AM
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Your other problem is that there's no protection from the rain for your groceries. If you don't care about that then the cargo net suggester earlier would do the trick.

I've tried a lot of things over the years and personally I prefer front & rear panniers, and if that's insufficient capacity I hook up one of my trailers. If you keep an eye on ebay you'll pick up panniers pretty cheaply.
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Old 04-27-11, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr. Phisure
42Kg, 58KM round trip. You will get the hang of it. Keep trying, keep smiling
I hope you didn't forget anything.
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Old 04-28-11, 01:58 PM
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I've never lost anything out the top of my cheap folding grocery pannier, and have had much larger cargoes, and much smaller ones as well. Your basket is at the top of the "pendulum" where the bike sways back and forth as you pedal or change direction.... you need to get your load down lower, or move it to the front, or strap it in and hope for the best. Folding panniers, either cloth or wire, would work a lot better than a basket on top.

Wald's rigid wire panniers would let you rent out your bike to moving companies.
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Old 04-29-11, 12:26 PM
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I stabilize loads in a rear basket by putting them in a daypack, & use the pack's compression straps to anchor it if necessary. Wire basket easier to lash to than mesh, of course.

For loads big enough to fill both pack and basket, one can use the pack in place of a cargo net - fill the basket, then strap the pack on on top:
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