Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Utility Cycling
Reload this Page >

Front rack to hold a milk crate?

Notices
Utility Cycling Want to haul groceries, beer, maybe even your kids? You don't have to live car free to put your bike to use as a workhorse. Here's the place to share and learn about the bicycle as a utility vehicle.

Front rack to hold a milk crate?

Old 10-25-11, 10:32 AM
  #1  
tony_merlino
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tony_merlino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northeastern NJ - NYC Metro Area
Posts: 795
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Front rack to hold a milk crate?

The milk crate thread got me thinking that I'd like to mount the milk crate that I used to have on my rear rack (I hated that!), on the front of my bike. The bike started life as a early 1990s Specialized HardRock. What are good options for a front rack to hold a crate?

I have a stem extender on the bike, and trekking bars, so I think I'd prefer something that mounts to the stem rather than the handlebars. I'd also prefer a mounting scheme that would let me take the crate off without too much trouble, for when I'm not doing heavy shopping.

Is there a way to do this?
tony_merlino is offline  
Old 10-25-11, 11:09 AM
  #2  
jankdc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 82
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
A little pricey, and attaches to the fork rather than the stem: https://cetmacargo.com/CETMACargoHalfrack.htm
jankdc is offline  
Old 10-25-11, 02:04 PM
  #3  
Nightshade
Humvee of bikes =Worksman
 
Nightshade's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 5,362
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by jankdc View Post
A little pricey, and attaches to the fork rather than the stem: https://cetmacargo.com/CETMACargoHalfrack.htm

While a little pricey this rack is strong and perfect to handle a swinging load on the front can be safely carried. The swinging part is what will collapse lesser racks.
__________________
My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
Nightshade is offline  
Old 10-25-11, 04:08 PM
  #4  
tony_merlino
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tony_merlino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northeastern NJ - NYC Metro Area
Posts: 795
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jankdc View Post
A little pricey, and attaches to the fork rather than the stem: https://cetmacargo.com/CETMACargoHalfrack.htm
Thanks! This seems like a really good idea, i.e. using the brake mounting hole and the axle. But I'm choking on the price. $150 to support a milk crate that I got for free ... hmmm.

Any experience with this one? https://www.amazon.com/Sunlite-Gold-T...ef=pd_sbs_sg_1

Edit: Typed this before reading Nightshade's response. I'm thinking I should save the milk crate for storage in the garage, and invest in a second Wald folding rack for the back if I routinely carry more than the first one will handle.

Last edited by tony_merlino; 10-25-11 at 04:12 PM.
tony_merlino is offline  
Old 10-25-11, 04:37 PM
  #5  
jankdc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 82
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by tony_merlino View Post
Thanks! This seems like a really good idea, i.e. using the brake mounting hole and the axle. But I'm choking on the price. $150 to support a milk crate that I got for free ... hmmm.

Any experience with this one? https://www.amazon.com/Sunlite-Gold-T...ef=pd_sbs_sg_1
You do the best that you can with what you have. Years ago, we used a two wheeled shopping cart bungeed to the rear rack for a trailer. It worked great and tracked well, but they weren't designed for that and would break after a couple of months. We would usually buy them used.

The sunlite would work for a while, and then it would break. In the reviews, people were saying that they broke at 30lbs. So just make sure you don't put too much in it.

If I wanted to buy a front rack, I would buy a Cetma or a wald basket (https://www.amazon.com/Wald-Giant-Del...pr_product_top). The Cetma 3 rail is "only" $100 and can hold 60 lbs: https://cetmacargo.com/CETMACargo3rail.htm but you do need to attach it to the handlebars.

Edit: I think you're right to go with another basket. Can you bungee the crate on the back rack?

Last edited by jankdc; 10-25-11 at 04:39 PM. Reason: Didn't see other edit.
jankdc is offline  
Old 10-25-11, 04:55 PM
  #6  
tony_merlino
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tony_merlino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northeastern NJ - NYC Metro Area
Posts: 795
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jankdc View Post
You do the best that you can with what you have. Years ago, we used a two wheeled shopping cart bungeed to the rear rack for a trailer. It worked great and tracked well, but they weren't designed for that and would break after a couple of months. We would usually buy them used.

The sunlite would work for a while, and then it would break. In the reviews, people were saying that they broke at 30lbs. So just make sure you don't put too much in it.

If I wanted to buy a front rack, I would buy a Cetma or a wald basket (https://www.amazon.com/Wald-Giant-Del...pr_product_top). The Cetma 3 rail is "only" $100 and can hold 60 lbs: https://cetmacargo.com/CETMACargo3rail.htm but you do need to attach it to the handlebars.

Edit: I think you're right to go with another basket. Can you bungee the crate on the back rack?
I used to have the crate on the back rack - I really hated the way the bike handled with a load of groceries, and I couldn't lift my leg up over the crate, so I'd have to tip the bike quite a bit to get on - which also was a challenge with a full load. I'm fairly short (5'8") to begin with, and my legs are short even for someone of my height. If I were starting from scratch and looking for a utility bike, I'd probably try to tell myself that I'm secure in my manhood and go for a step-through. (Growing up in NYC in the '50s and early '60s makes it REALLY hard for me to get on "girl's bike" ) But I'm approaching it the way you did, and making do with what I have (more or less).

The idea of getting some use out of the crate was sort of a whim. I'll probably just get another of the folding rear baskets if I like the first one. (It just shipped today, so I should have it by the weekend!) And if that's not enough, the next step is probably a trunk that's only as high as the seat. Or I could always just shop more often, and buy less stuff ...
tony_merlino is offline  
Old 10-26-11, 07:27 AM
  #7  
bud16415
Senior Member
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Erie Penna.
Posts: 1,141
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Here is the front rack I built. It could easily hold a milk crate. I have about $15 in hardware store aluminum and bolts, nuts in it. Mine holds two front panniers and a sleep system on the platform. I chose aluminum for weight reasons, ease in bending and corrosion resistance.

bud16415 is offline  
Old 10-26-11, 11:23 AM
  #8  
tony_merlino
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tony_merlino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northeastern NJ - NYC Metro Area
Posts: 795
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That looks great! I was just thinking about what I could do with some Home Depot aluminum last night. Did you drill through the fork for the second support? Or is it using zip-ties? Hose clamps would probably work, too.
tony_merlino is offline  
Old 10-26-11, 12:22 PM
  #9  
bud16415
Senior Member
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Erie Penna.
Posts: 1,141
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by tony_merlino View Post
That looks great! I was just thinking about what I could do with some Home Depot aluminum last night. Did you drill through the fork for the second support? Or is it using zip-ties? Hose clamps would probably work, too.
My bike is a touring bike and they have braze on lugs half way up the fork. Most likely your bike just has them at the bottom but they sell rubber coated "P" clamps that will wrap around the fork and give you a place to bolt something. Don’t drill thru the fork would be my recommendation it will cause a weak spot right where you don’t need it. The fork did have a hole at the top where a brake or reflector would mount. If yours didn’t have that hole one could be drilled safely I think.

I just cut some wood to the width I wanted the bends to be and sandwiched the strips in a vice and bent them over with a hammer after cutting to length and drilling the holes. I used a block of wood to pound on as to not mark up the strips. the first joint off the fork was to allow it to be level no matter what the tube angle is on the bike.

I haven't load tested this but I would guess I could put a person on it for a ride if they were not too large. 50 pounds I'm sure it would carry easy. That’s way more than I would want to try steering the bike with however. The higher the weight is the more unstable the bike. That’s why most tour bikes want the front panniers almost to the ground. My sleep system only weighs about 8 pounds and panniers I mount off to the sides hang lower. In total I have 20 pounds or less on the front.

One thing about building your own like this compared to hanging them from the bars is you can get it as low to the tire as possible. Mine almost touches the fender.

It’s a pretty easy project if you are a little bit handy with tools. I used all 5mm screws on mine as that’s the common one on bikes, and I already carry tools for that size.
bud16415 is offline  
Old 10-26-11, 12:36 PM
  #10  
bud16415
Senior Member
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Erie Penna.
Posts: 1,141
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
One more idea I had but didn’t try. Others have rigged a rear rack to the front putting it on backwards and making something to simulate the top mounting point like you would have in the back. That will give you a longer platform than most of the front racks have.

I have had all kinds of crates and boxes and baskets mounted to racks over the years. Zip Ties work good for that if you plan on leaving them on. if not screws and wing nuts work well. I have never had much luck with bungees for holding a basket on but they work great for attaching stuff to the baskets.

Here is my back basket and rack setup on this bike.



Similar basket on another bike.


bud16415 is offline  
Old 10-26-11, 01:22 PM
  #11  
ka0use
Senior Member
 
ka0use's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Denver, Freak Hill, Colorado
Posts: 1,138

Bikes: 2003 Bianchi Lynx MTB bought new. Her name is Judy.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
another source

www.oldmanmountain.com


you might consider amortizing. companies do this on large expenditures.

$150 for a solid rack / 10 years = $15 per year, or $1.25 per month. every time you use
the rack it will pay for itself.

think of the value you get from washing machines, dryers and refridgerators.
they last a loooong time for what you pay.

Last edited by ka0use; 10-26-11 at 01:35 PM.
ka0use is offline  
Old 10-26-11, 05:19 PM
  #12  
Dylansbob 
2k miles from the midwest
 
Dylansbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Washington
Posts: 1,290

Bikes: ~'75 Colin Laing, '80s Schwinn SuperSport 650b, ex-Backroads ti project...

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 248 Post(s)
Liked 339 Times in 171 Posts
I'm a real fan of the old Blackburn Mountain racks. They were pre-drilled to run a single strut in the center to the brake bridge or the normal two stays, but they are also long enough to work on a the fork. I'm using an old industrial wire basket from a thrift store attached with three old toe straps. Works great.
Dylansbob is offline  
Old 10-26-11, 05:58 PM
  #13  
tony_merlino
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tony_merlino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northeastern NJ - NYC Metro Area
Posts: 795
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bud16415 View Post
My bike is a touring bike and they have braze on lugs half way up the fork. Most likely your bike just has them at the bottom but they sell rubber coated "P" clamps that will wrap around the fork and give you a place to bolt something. Don’t drill thru the fork would be my recommendation it will cause a weak spot right where you don’t need it. The fork did have a hole at the top where a brake or reflector would mount. If yours didn’t have that hole one could be drilled safely I think.

I just cut some wood to the width I wanted the bends to be and sandwiched the strips in a vice and bent them over with a hammer after cutting to length and drilling the holes. I used a block of wood to pound on as to not mark up the strips. the first joint off the fork was to allow it to be level no matter what the tube angle is on the bike.

I haven't load tested this but I would guess I could put a person on it for a ride if they were not too large. 50 pounds I'm sure it would carry easy. That’s way more than I would want to try steering the bike with however. The higher the weight is the more unstable the bike. That’s why most tour bikes want the front panniers almost to the ground. My sleep system only weighs about 8 pounds and panniers I mount off to the sides hang lower. In total I have 20 pounds or less on the front.

One thing about building your own like this compared to hanging them from the bars is you can get it as low to the tire as possible. Mine almost touches the fender.

It’s a pretty easy project if you are a little bit handy with tools. I used all 5mm screws on mine as that’s the common one on bikes, and I already carry tools for that size.
Originally Posted by bud16415 View Post
My bike is a touring bike and they have braze on lugs half way up the fork. Most likely your bike just has them at the bottom but they sell rubber coated "P" clamps that will wrap around the fork and give you a place to bolt something. Don’t drill thru the fork would be my recommendation it will cause a weak spot right where you don’t need it. The fork did have a hole at the top where a brake or reflector would mount. If yours didn’t have that hole one could be drilled safely I think.

I just cut some wood to the width I wanted the bends to be and sandwiched the strips in a vice and bent them over with a hammer after cutting to length and drilling the holes. I used a block of wood to pound on as to not mark up the strips. the first joint off the fork was to allow it to be level no matter what the tube angle is on the bike.

I haven't load tested this but I would guess I could put a person on it for a ride if they were not too large. 50 pounds I'm sure it would carry easy. That’s way more than I would want to try steering the bike with however. The higher the weight is the more unstable the bike. That’s why most tour bikes want the front panniers almost to the ground. My sleep system only weighs about 8 pounds and panniers I mount off to the sides hang lower. In total I have 20 pounds or less on the front.

One thing about building your own like this compared to hanging them from the bars is you can get it as low to the tire as possible. Mine almost touches the fender.

It’s a pretty easy project if you are a little bit handy with tools. I used all 5mm screws on mine as that’s the common one on bikes, and I already carry tools for that size.
Even if I wind up not needing it, I want to do this just because it's so cool! My bike does have a hole there to mount to (that's where my fenders are mounted). I have cantilever brakes, so those holes are also candidates...

Home Depot carries the p-clamps, but they're called loom clamps. So, it seems like this rack will be a one-stop shopping project...
tony_merlino is offline  
Old 10-26-11, 06:06 PM
  #14  
tony_merlino
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tony_merlino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northeastern NJ - NYC Metro Area
Posts: 795
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ka0use View Post
www.oldmanmountain.com


you might consider amortizing. companies do this on large expenditures.

$150 for a solid rack / 10 years = $15 per year, or $1.25 per month. every time you use
the rack it will pay for itself.

think of the value you get from washing machines, dryers and refridgerators.
they last a loooong time for what you pay.
I'm 59 year old. I'm not sure I have 10 years of riding left to amortize this over!
tony_merlino is offline  
Old 10-26-11, 06:37 PM
  #15  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,318 Times in 828 Posts
Paul's Flatbed is another nice Porteur style front rack.. aluminum and wood slats.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 10-26-11, 09:20 PM
  #16  
jankdc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 82
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Paul's Flatbed is another nice Porteur style front rack.. aluminum and wood slats.
Nice, but it is more than the others that Tony was saying was too expensive.

Originally Posted by tony_merlino View Post
Even if I wind up not needing it, I want to do this just because it's so cool! My bike does have a hole there to mount to (that's where my fenders are mounted). I have cantilever brakes, so those holes are also candidates...

Home Depot carries the p-clamps, but they're called loom clamps. So, it seems like this rack will be a one-stop shopping project...
Post pictures if you do it.
jankdc is offline  
Old 10-26-11, 09:22 PM
  #17  
ka0use
Senior Member
 
ka0use's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Denver, Freak Hill, Colorado
Posts: 1,138

Bikes: 2003 Bianchi Lynx MTB bought new. Her name is Judy.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by tony_merlino View Post
I'm 59 year old. I'm not sure I have 10 years of riding left to amortize this over!
you made me snort! at 58 i'm not getting another cat. and i stopped buying green bananas 2 years ago.
ka0use is offline  
Old 10-27-11, 02:01 AM
  #18  
memnoch_proxy
nw commuter
 
memnoch_proxy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Washington, US
Posts: 183

Bikes: trek antelope, trek 3900

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by tony_merlino View Post
I'm 59 year old. I'm not sure I have 10 years of riding left to amortize this over!
Chin up, young man, you keep riding and your children will be gasping to catch up with you. I met a 75 year young man that started biking when he was 70 down the west coast from Bellingham to the Oregon coast every summer with his family.
memnoch_proxy is offline  
Old 10-27-11, 02:03 AM
  #19  
memnoch_proxy
nw commuter
 
memnoch_proxy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Washington, US
Posts: 183

Bikes: trek antelope, trek 3900

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
[QUOTE=bud16415;13414759]Here is the front rack I built. It could easily hold a milk crate. I have about $15 in hardware store aluminum and bolts, nuts in it. Mine holds two front panniers and a sleep system on the platform. I chose aluminum for weight reasons, ease in bending and corrosion resistance.

I've tried making bike light brackets out of aluminum flashing and find that road vibration has vibrated them apart at the bends in about 500 miles.
memnoch_proxy is offline  
Old 10-27-11, 05:45 AM
  #20  
bud16415
Senior Member
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Erie Penna.
Posts: 1,141
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Tony

The Home Depot clamps will work fine. They also have a good assortment of plated 5mm screws. Another source for P clamps is your LBS. Every rack they put on has an assortment of clamps and most places throw the unused stuff in a box. The Bike store ones are stainless I think. By all means post some pictures as you go. I always forget to take them as going along or like this I didn’t think anyone would be interested. I do have plans to build a matching rear rack even though the one I have works fine. Like you I just feel like it would be a fun project this winter. I will try and get photos of that build.

I had to laugh at the age comments as to amortizing costs, I'm also getting long in the tooth.

Memnoch_proxy

The aluminum I used was quite a bit thicker than flashing aluminum. I think it was 1/8 x 3/4 grade 6061 if memory serves me. The key to strength in doing something like this is the bend radius. The way mine was designed there was no need to have sharp inside corners and I rounded the corners on the wooden blocks I used as a bending form.

I do anticipate things breaking on a touring bike and most times they fail out in the middle of nowhere. the reason for a bolt together design was that when a part does break the temporary fix or the long term fix would just involve replacing one part. My first pass at this rack I only had a single stay on each side. It felt very solid that way and most likely would have been fine. I went to the double stay thinking with 5 points of support even if one or two failed I would still be good to go with maybe just a duck tape repair. Here is a photo of the rack with only a single stay per side. The OP might want to make his like this.



bud16415 is offline  
Old 10-27-11, 06:08 AM
  #21  
bud16415
Senior Member
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Erie Penna.
Posts: 1,141
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by tony_merlino View Post
Home Depot carries the p-clamps, but they're called loom clamps. So, it seems like this rack will be a one-stop shopping project...
When using the P clamps, I like to use the one that’s slightly larger than the diameter of the part of the bike I'm clamping to. Then wrap the spot with a few turns of rubber cut from a scrap inner tube and held with a thin strip of electrical tape. The rubber will protect the paint better than the coating on the clamp and help as a shock mount also.
bud16415 is offline  
Old 10-27-11, 01:40 PM
  #22  
tony_merlino
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tony_merlino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northeastern NJ - NYC Metro Area
Posts: 795
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bud16415 View Post
When using the P clamps, I like to use the one that’s slightly larger than the diameter of the part of the bike I'm clamping to. Then wrap the spot with a few turns of rubber cut from a scrap inner tube and held with a thin strip of electrical tape. The rubber will protect the paint better than the coating on the clamp and help as a shock mount also.
I was thinking along the same lines, i.e. scrap inner tube. I really like the way you have that bike set up, BTW. I'm thinking that, for people in my situation, (dense suburban, nearly urban settings), a touring bike kind of setup like that may be the optimal utility cycle. I could do my whole week's shopping with one trip on that bike, and still use it for pleasure/exercise rides when I felt like it, just by lifting off some baskets and/or panniers.
tony_merlino is offline  
Old 10-27-11, 06:58 PM
  #23  
Dynocoaster 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 3,097

Bikes: Too many....................

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 3 Posts
https://publicbikes.com/p/PUBLIC-Front-Rack
__________________
Speed Uno
Dawes Kingpin 2speed
Dynocoaster is offline  
Old 10-28-11, 06:07 AM
  #24  
bud16415
Senior Member
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Erie Penna.
Posts: 1,141
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by tony_merlino View Post
I was thinking along the same lines, i.e. scrap inner tube. I really like the way you have that bike set up, BTW. I'm thinking that, for people in my situation, (dense suburban, nearly urban settings), a touring bike kind of setup like that may be the optimal utility cycle. I could do my whole week's shopping with one trip on that bike, and still use it for pleasure/exercise rides when I felt like it, just by lifting off some baskets and/or panniers.
Tony

Thanks, I do love how the Windsor is turning out, and I use it very much in the ways you mentioned. I could easily have 50 bikes as I love collecting and riding them. But I have limited myself to 4 or 5. I have a road bike a Cannondale that I love but I end up taking the Windsor because it rides so much better (softer) and has the low climbing gears. I have a KHS mtn bike converted to a hybrid I really love but take the Windsor because its longer and less twitchy. I could go on.

I bought the Windsor used from a guy that bought it used thinking it just what he wanted as a commuter grocery getter, and he hated it. He was a straight bar hybrid kind of guy. At first I wasn’t too fond of the touring bike ether. I gave it a try and made a lot of ride position changes the most significant being that drop bars don’t have to have you doing a hand stand. The reason I bought it was to set it up as a touring only bike and do a few short overnight trips. The more I rode it the more I figured out I could make the bike multipurpose. I have had that rear basket setup on several bikes, it’s a front basket turned sideways. the basket holds a light weight cooler perfect and is a good all around carry place. the basket was too wide and made attaching the bin panniers imposable so I extended the rack width. if I build a mate to the front rack that will all be in the design. when adding the bins and a basket to the front you are right you can haul as many groceries as you have strength to get them home with. A bike like this could easily carry 80 pounds of groceries for you.

As of late I have been rethinking the front rack and pannier system. Not that there is anything wrong with how I did it or its ability to carry items, but I think the ideal front platform for both Touring and around town use would be one that was frame mounted not fork mounted. I am thinking about a good size frame platform and a really simple pannier mounting below on the fork. the panniers would turn with the fork underneath the fixed platform. Many Dutch bikes are built this way and I think with a heavy load it would be much more stable. I haven't seen anyone do this on a tour setup yet.

Hope you are having fun with the project. Keep the thread going with the progress.
bud16415 is offline  
Old 11-26-11, 03:35 PM
  #25  
LeeG
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,952
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by ka0use View Post
I like the OMM Sherpa. The ColdSpring would be better for mounting a milkcrate as it's wider.
LeeG is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
unterhausen
Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling
7
05-22-19 06:23 AM
mariachi
Commuting
6
07-25-16 07:45 AM
cpg
Folding Bikes
10
04-19-13 02:49 PM
buldogge
Classic & Vintage
26
12-14-10 02:46 AM
MACAQUE
Classic & Vintage
8
10-31-10 08:38 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.