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My first flat on my Yuba Mundo- of course its the rear one!

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My first flat on my Yuba Mundo- of course its the rear one!

Old 03-07-12, 02:36 PM
  #26  
bendembroski
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Originally Posted by Youaintgotjack View Post
I think people underestimate having a 20 month old baby to watch while changing a flat is not by any means realistic, on the side of the road or in a garage for that matter. He is old enough to climb, push and run and not old enough to be trustworthy to listen to direction. I'm not on any superwoman quest to prove anything, even if I got a flat beside a play structure I still wouldn't let my child play unassisted because he thinks he can fly.
I know exactly what you are talking about. I've got a 4 year old and a 1.5 year old, and got a flat recently with them both in tow. Now, they were in the trailer so I could just leave them strapped in while I went about my business. Of course, this percisley when the younger decides he wants out an throws a tantum; flailing arms striking his impressively patient sister. Letting him play with the air pump helped.

Depending on how active the kid is, it's only doable if you can keep the kid strapped in, and I'm not sure how you will do that on a Yuba even with the double leg stand. Maybe the cobra tubes would work, but you'd certainly have to practice unseating and reseating the bead with the bike upright. I don't even want to think about doing that with all tubes around the Yuba's rear wheel.

Yeah, Marathon Plus tyres are the way to go.
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Old 03-07-12, 02:39 PM
  #27  
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Thanks for the info. I used to ride bikes all the time but I don't remember getting a flat. I'll prepare for the worst but hope my record stands. I would have thought the street cleaners would have picked up garbage along the curb. I see them spring through fall.
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Old 03-07-12, 03:04 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Suburban View Post
Thanks for the info. I used to ride bikes all the time but I don't remember getting a flat. I'll prepare for the worst but hope my record stands. I would have thought the street cleaners would have picked up garbage along the curb. I see them spring through fall.
The cars going past push all the junk to the side of the road. Where the car tyre's track has the least debris.
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Old 03-07-12, 09:28 PM
  #29  
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When I was that age, mom had a harness and leash for me. Seems to have gone out of fashion as families have gotten smaller.
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Old 03-07-12, 10:47 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by kevbo View Post
When I was that age, mom had a harness and leash for me. Seems to have gone out of fashion as families have gotten smaller.
They still have them Kevbo. Jack has on but he can get out of it in less than 2 seconds!
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Old 03-07-12, 10:53 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by bendembroski View Post
I know exactly what you are talking about. I've got a 4 year old and a 1.5 year old, and got a flat recently with them both in tow. Now, they were in the trailer so I could just leave them strapped in while I went about my business. Of course, this percisley when the younger decides he wants out an throws a tantum; flailing arms striking his impressively patient sister. Letting him play with the air pump helped.

Depending on how active the kid is, it's only doable if you can keep the kid strapped in, and I'm not sure how you will do that on a Yuba even with the double leg stand. Maybe the cobra tubes would work, but you'd certainly have to practice unseating and reseating the bead with the bike upright. I don't even want to think about doing that with all tubes around the Yuba's rear wheel.

Yeah, Marathon Plus tyres are the way to go.
I think even with the double kickstand it would be a bit risky. A trailer would be helpful but would make the yuba slightly redundant for me lol
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Old 03-07-12, 11:03 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by bendembroski View Post
The cars going past push all the junk to the side of the road. Where the car tyre's track has the least debris.
thats exactly it!
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Old 03-08-12, 08:35 AM
  #33  
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I've used leash's before. I've also been accosted in the street by complete strangers for "disrespecting" my child using a leash. Of course, small children shouldn't walk they belong strapped down in strollers. @@
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Old 03-08-12, 10:53 AM
  #34  
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I just love it when strangers tell me how to raise my children.

Last edited by bendembroski; 03-09-12 at 01:44 AM. Reason: Strangers, not dangers! Stupid autocomplete.
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Old 03-08-12, 04:57 PM
  #35  
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For the benefit of those of us who do not yet have children, what would be the feasibility of this scenario?

In the context of Youaintgotjack's setup, leaving the child strapped in, while laying the bike down, derailleur-side down?

If one had a spare tube zip-tied to the frame and a set of tire levers, one could simply switch the punctured tube for a fresh tube in all of 5 minutes, without removing the wheel, even with as many bars as the Yuba has in that area...The child is the variable which is unknown to me.
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Old 03-08-12, 05:31 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by kevbo View Post
When I was that age, mom had a harness and leash for me. Seems to have gone out of fashion as families have gotten smaller.
I remember the good old days when mom used to harness me up to the bicycle.

Either the Schwab Marathon's or the Specialized Armadillos will work for you. I went from a flat a week down to two in six months, both from nails.
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Old 03-08-12, 08:54 PM
  #37  
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+1 to one of the Schwalbe Marathon tires, they are a bit pricey but seem to do the job well
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Old 03-09-12, 05:02 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Ranko Kohime View Post
For the benefit of those of us who do not yet have children, what would be the feasibility of this scenario?

In the context of Youaintgotjack's setup, leaving the child strapped in, while laying the bike down, derailleur-side down?
The bike would have to be able to stay upright, and STABLE, if the kid was going to remain strapped in.
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Old 03-09-12, 08:39 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by Northwestrider View Post
+1 to one of the Schwalbe Marathon tires, they are a bit pricey but seem to do the job well
The big apples come in sizes more appropriate for the Mundo...pretty similar tires.
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Old 03-09-12, 08:56 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by kevbo View Post
The big apples come in sizes more appropriate for the Mundo...pretty similar tires.
I prefer the Big Apple's to the standard Marathons, but as far as puncture resistance the Marathon Plus is in an entirely different league.
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Old 03-09-12, 09:41 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by Ranko Kohime View Post
For the benefit of those of us who do not yet have children, what would be the feasibility of this scenario?

In the context of Youaintgotjack's setup, leaving the child strapped in, while laying the bike down, derailleur-side down?

If one had a spare tube zip-tied to the frame and a set of tire levers, one could simply switch the punctured tube for a fresh tube in all of 5 minutes, without removing the wheel, even with as many bars as the Yuba has in that area...The child is the variable which is unknown to me.

As a parent, be as convincing as possible to keep your child away from the road. Try to get them to participate if you can get their interest. They younger they are, the less likely this is.
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Old 03-09-12, 10:21 AM
  #42  
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I wouldn't leave him in the seat with it on its side- face head on ground, uncomfortable, dangerous. If you saw the seat with the child in it and the bike- you would see how that wouldn't work.

Accidents happen all the time, when I had a child I promised to protect him as much as possible from any foreseeable danger, which is why I bought a bike in the first place. I can honestly say from a mum's prospective there is no easy answer to this question for Jack's age/accountability level.

If you watch a group of toddlers at play, which I did just yesterday you can see multitudes of different levels of mental and physical ability even in similar sized/aged children. My child is very advanced physically- he can pass tests for kids a year older and has amazing dexterity and balance. But mentally he's still a 21 month old who by all means does everything a 3 year old can.
The issue with toddlers is their whole mind set is "LEARN, and LEARN everything you can"- toddlers translate this into testing boundaries of physical and emotional self. Examining in depth everything and touching, feeling, tasting the entire world. I know we all know this- but the point I'm trying to make is no child at Jack's emotional level should be trusted beside a road for any amount of time without a firm hand holding theirs and a person whose job is to give that child 99.9% of their focus. Nothing anyone can say will change my mind on that. I am around children all the time- literally- and they still amaze me in their ability to find danger in a split second- even in a child proofed home.

Two examples that come to mind- last week my child had a bunch of keys he was playing with that Id handed to him to keep his hands busy whilst I put the groceries away. After trying to put them in the utility room keyhole- he decided the electric outlet was a keyhole! This took less than a second from door to outlet. That is my child! haha and he's 100% normal- they are all like that!
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Old 03-09-12, 10:29 AM
  #43  
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I'm very much the kind of parent that prefers to let my kids 'learn things the hard way'. Bumps, bruises, and tears are all very effective teachers regarding the nature of the big, bad world.

That said, I would never consider letting a 20-something month old at the side of the road without my full and complete attention, and a firm grasp on their hand.

Yup, no roadside puncture repair with toddler unless you can keep 'em restrained in a seat / trailer / whatever.

This is something that I too will soon have to come with a solution to, as the trailer is being exchanged for a cargo bike with a passenger compartment.
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Old 03-10-12, 04:53 PM
  #44  
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Forget thorn proof liners and tubes, get better tires.
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Old 03-10-12, 09:48 PM
  #45  
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We use the ESGE double legged kickstands and IF, I remember right, they, "highly" recommend NOT leaving a "child in the child seat" while the bike is on the "stand", FYI. That Yuba is hefty bike and the double legged stands do have recommended weight limits, ours are listed for "25 KG" max. load. I'd go with getting some "Marathon Extremes" and using a "tire sealer" too! We recommend a product called: TRUE GOO, it's not full of "fibers" like Slime, etc. so it won't "PLUG UP" valve cores, and doesn't "spit back at you near as much" when you air up the tube from our experiences over many years! YMMV.
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Old 03-10-12, 10:25 PM
  #46  
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How far from home do you usually go with Jack in the seat? If you still get a flat despite good puncture-resistant tires, sealant, etc. there may also be the option of just riding home with the flat tire. I've done this on a couple occasions when something went wrong with my flat-changing toolset and discovered that it's not nearly as bad as I feared as long as I kept my speed down. The ride's bumpier, the handling a little squirrelly, and it's harder to pedal, but at up to about 10 mph it was very manageable and surprisingly there was no damage at all as a result of riding up to 6 miles on the flat - not to the rim and not even to the tire.
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Old 03-11-12, 10:06 PM
  #47  
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Hi folks- so I ended up going to my LBS on Friday and they recommended liners and the pre-slimed tubes. For $59 I got the tubes and liners fitted with a 12 month no flat guarantee (free repair and replacement if I get a flat). I managed to borrow a pump from my mum and it has a P.S.I. gauge built in. I'm also trying to learn what the right pressure feels like so I can just stop at a gas station if needed.

I know there are a multitude of different opinions on this subject and have appreciated everyone's comments. It seemed like this was the most affordable fix for me at the time and the simplest. The LBS owner said the only downside would be the added weight and we all had a chuckle about that because honestly that is not on my "worry radar" for the time being.

Since fitting the flat I've been out twice and took my longest ride to date (just over 10 miles). I honestly haven't noticed any change in weight at all between baby gear and my gear- I couldn't tell.

Thank you all for your help and comments! Love this forum!
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Old 03-11-12, 10:15 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by bendembroski View Post
I'm very much the kind of parent that prefers to let my kids 'learn things the hard way'. Bumps, bruises, and tears are all very effective teachers regarding the nature of the big, bad world.

That said, I would never consider letting a 20-something month old at the side of the road without my full and complete attention, and a firm grasp on their hand.

Yup, no roadside puncture repair with toddler unless you can keep 'em restrained in a seat / trailer / whatever.

This is something that I too will soon have to come with a solution to, as the trailer is being exchanged for a cargo bike with a passenger compartment.
I totally agree- I have no issue with bumps and bruises- but taking potentially life threatening risks is just not me. I think this would be a judgement best left to the individual parent based on location at time of flat and accountability and maturity level of the child. Good luck with your solution Let me know!

Originally Posted by bjjoondo View Post
We use the ESGE double legged kickstands and IF, I remember right, they, "highly" recommend NOT leaving a "child in the child seat" while the bike is on the "stand", FYI. That Yuba is hefty bike and the double legged stands do have recommended weight limits, ours are listed for "25 KG" max. load. I'd go with getting some "Marathon Extremes" and using a "tire sealer" too! We recommend a product called: TRUE GOO, it's not full of "fibers" like Slime, etc. so it won't "PLUG UP" valve cores, and doesn't "spit back at you near as much" when you air up the tube from our experiences over many years! YMMV.
Yeah, I have stepped back to take a picture with him in the seat if its leaning against something for extra support, but it just seems too dodgy for extended time over a split second or two. I have a Yuba double kickstand on my list of wants/needs.

Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
How far from home do you usually go with Jack in the seat? If you still get a flat despite good puncture-resistant tires, sealant, etc. there may also be the option of just riding home with the flat tire. I've done this on a couple occasions when something went wrong with my flat-changing toolset and discovered that it's not nearly as bad as I feared as long as I kept my speed down. The ride's bumpier, the handling a little squirrelly, and it's harder to pedal, but at up to about 10 mph it was very manageable and surprisingly there was no damage at all as a result of riding up to 6 miles on the flat - not to the rim and not even to the tire.
It really depends- I just did my first 10 mile ride, and I hope to just keep building on that. I'm sure if it was a slow leak I could fill it and ride it until it was low. I asked at the LBS and they reckoned It would be fine with Jack's weight in his seat with no air but probably would just walk myself or call a taxi (we have van ones around here).
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Old 03-12-12, 03:24 AM
  #49  
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In some countrys peopel carry theyr children strapped to the back (or resting on the hip when they get older and heavyer). I did it myself after learning it in Africa but it is also done in the far east. If your child is used to being carryed like this and you can take the load I am sure it is possible to fix a flat with th echild temporearely strapped to your body like that, at least for us who are used to fixing flats and can do it fast.

Reading this thread I have also been thinking: Is it possible to remowe the seat from the bike, one way or another place it securely on the ground and keep the child in the seat that it is used to sit in without the risk of falling over with the bike? You could use your modifyed milkcrate childseat for this or invent some sturdy legs or frame for your seat to be placed on the ground as described.
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Old 03-12-12, 07:58 AM
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I used wraps to carry my oldest and youngest a lot. He's too big for me now. But at 18 months, that would work nicely.
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