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Hauling Plywood

Old 09-24-12, 03:02 AM
  #26  
ztriple3
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Originally Posted by ztriple3 View Post
I'm about to try this, with something a little smaller than a half sheet of plywood:
If the minimum dimension of the plywood is too long to hold it under your arm, tie rope tight around it like a birthday present ribbon (across both dimensions). then place the board under one arm and hold onto the rope with your hand. bike with one hand on the handle bars and one hand securing the plywood under your arm.
So i did try this, and It was trickier than i expected. Holding plywood cut in 1/3rds (about 3' X 4', and stacked 3 deep) was very heavy, so i ended up bundling this stack and resting it on my right pedal, leaning up against the right handle bar (standing tallwise). I only live about a mile and a half from the home depot so i walked my bike most of the way, basically using it as a dolly. I was able to ride my bike sidesaddle with braking down one long gently-sloping hill, after readjusting the plywood bundle in a lengthwise orientation on the right pedal and riding with my right foot on the left pedal and both hands on the handle bars. This readjustment was necessary because my weight on the left pedal raised the height of the right pedal and plywood, and this height change required plywood orientation readjustment upon starting and finishing the sidesaddle downhill ride.
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Old 09-24-12, 06:29 AM
  #27  
Esteban32696
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Originally Posted by ztriple3 View Post
So i did try this, and It was trickier than i expected. Holding plywood cut in 1/3rds (about 3' X 4', and stacked 3 deep) was very heavy, so i ended up bundling this stack and resting it on my right pedal, leaning up against the right handle bar (standing tallwise). I only live about a mile and a half from the home depot so i walked my bike most of the way, basically using it as a dolly. I was able to ride my bike sidesaddle with braking down one long gently-sloping hill, after readjusting the plywood bundle in a lengthwise orientation on the right pedal and riding with my right foot on the left pedal and both hands on the handle bars. This readjustment was necessary because my weight on the left pedal raised the height of the right pedal and plywood, and this height change required plywood orientation readjustment upon starting and finishing the sidesaddle downhill ride.
Sounds SKKKKEEEERRRRYYY to me !
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Old 09-28-12, 02:47 PM
  #28  
Jamoni
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Originally Posted by iheartbacon View Post
there's a bike hauling plywood here:
http://www.bikesatwork.com/

i guess it's possible?
dear god look out! The wind is going to blow him away!!!
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Old 09-30-12, 07:30 PM
  #29  
kevbo
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Saw this on FB and thought it needed to be in this thread. I know nothing about the photo bike or rider except what we see:
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Old 10-16-12, 01:04 PM
  #30  
Jamoni
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/25831992@N03/2992463794/
Aiee! The wind!
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Old 11-03-12, 06:13 AM
  #31  
Jamoni
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I posted this over in the "Post your haul" thread, but thought I'd put it in here, too. It's not technically plywood, but it's close enough.
I needed some peg board to renovate my garage. The hardware store is only about a mile away, so I built a trailer out of scrap, lumber and some old dolly wheels I had laying around. Trailer only took about 15 minutes to build since I already had a hitch made.
So I rode up to the store, got my 6 sheets of pegboard, and rode home. It was slow going, but I made it! Should have used something a little stronger for the tongue, cause the aluminum bent about 200 yards from the house. I just shifted the load a little to the rear and bent it back.
The trailer is getting pulled apart since I need the lumber, but next one will be a lot tougher.
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Old 11-06-12, 10:22 PM
  #32  
bikesatwork
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If you have a large enough trailer, plywood is not difficult to carry flat or vertically. I've done it mostly on relatively calm days, but as Jamoni pointed out, the wind should not be a problem if you have enough weight to ballast the trailer

FWIW, we've received several requests from builders, handypeople, and DIYers who want to carry plywood but want to carry it vertically rather horizontally to minimize their width profile. So, we recently began making a rack for our trailers for that purpose:

http://www.bikesatwork.com/store/product/plywood-rack

.
--
Jim G.
Bikes At Work
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Old 11-09-12, 12:29 PM
  #33  
Tim199
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That's pretty nice, but you might want to include some warnings to only do it on calm days and probably only with several sheets. With that vertical profile an average gust of wind would create some pretty large forces and a potential safety hazard. Wind loads can easily reach 50-100 or more pounds in that configuration, which would either lift the plywood, or tip it over, even with a lot of ballast. The problem is a large force a few feet up requires a huge ballast to keep from tipping.
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