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Apparently cargo bikes are the new 'fixies'

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Apparently cargo bikes are the new 'fixies'

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Old 04-26-12, 02:05 AM
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bendembroski
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Apparently cargo bikes are the new 'fixies'

http://gizmodo.com/cargo-bike/

hmmm.
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Old 04-26-12, 06:55 AM
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I haven't noticed that in NYC yet. I've been seeing the same few "cargo people" for a few years, one rides a bakiefiets-like cargo bike carrying his daughter to school, then a couple of Mundos and BDs. There used to be one dude with a dog in a trailer, but I haven't seen him in a while.

Maybe in areas with less traffic, close to a beach, etc., they might be more popular.
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Old 04-26-12, 09:39 AM
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I think the big difference I've noticed between cargo bikes and fixed geared bikes is the demographics of the early adopters. Cargo bikes are a nice mix of moms, freds, hipsters, etc, whereas it was almost entirely the hipsters on fixed gears at first. Also, while fixed geared bikes didn't really do a whole lot to help develop a useful cycling culture in the US, if people are latching onto cargo bikes, that signals an awesome shift in the right direction.
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Old 04-26-12, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Nightdiver View Post
I think the big difference I've noticed between cargo bikes and fixed geared bikes is the demographics of the early adopters. Cargo bikes are a nice mix of moms, freds, hipsters, etc, whereas it was almost entirely the hipsters on fixed gears at first. Also, while fixed geared bikes didn't really do a whole lot to help develop a useful cycling culture in the US, if people are latching onto cargo bikes, that signals an awesome shift in the right direction.
x2, I will take any trend that gets more people on bikes and out of their cars. I just hope they are better advocates for the sport than many of the hipster crowd has been (mostly their complete dis-regard for traffic signs and rules)
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Old 04-26-12, 02:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Nightdiver View Post
...whereas it was almost entirely the hipsters on fixed gears at first.
Not quite. It was track bike racers riding their track bikes everywhere...I was one of those guys in the 80's on my Benotto track ride in West LA and the SFV...not a hipster by any stretch of the imagination then or now.
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Old 04-26-12, 03:10 PM
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Originally Posted by pick View Post
Not quite. It was track bike racers riding their track bikes everywhere...I was one of those guys in the 80's on my Benotto track ride in West LA and the SFV...not a hipster by any stretch of the imagination then or now.
I would think it's obvious we're talking about the "fixie" trend and not about the precursors to that trend. I'm also making blanket generalizations about who the riders are for both fixed gears and utility bikes. There will be more diversity in any group than such generalizations would account for. I didn't mention the pizza delivery guys who were using cycletrucks well before the recent boom of cargo bikes either. If there are any pizza delivery guys from the 70s who are offended by me calling them "moms" or "freds", I apologize.
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Old 04-26-12, 03:45 PM
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Amsterdam and Copenhagen its just another way to get around.
with stuff aboard.
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Old 04-26-12, 04:04 PM
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my 14 year old will simply not accept the concept that I am cool or hip in anyway. He does tell his friends that is dad is a "bike geek" ...in either a proud or cynical way....hard to tell he is 14.
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Old 04-26-12, 04:09 PM
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Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
...in either a proud or cynical way....hard to tell he is 14.
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Old 04-26-12, 07:41 PM
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We'll know the trend is real when we see cargo-bikes in Sprite/Coca-Cola commercials, as i learned from watching this documentary today: http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/front...hants-of-cool/
Judging by the thousands of dirt cheap fixies i see on craigslist...id say that fad is fading out....good time for me to buy one!

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Old 04-27-12, 01:13 PM
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The author is in my neighborhood, seems like a good enough guy.

But he's talking about SF and specifically SF surf culture, both of which make the long tail sensible.

Those other cargo bikes would definitely be at a disadvantage here.

Cargo bikes aren't really the new fixies as the guys who ride them are totally different.
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Old 04-27-12, 04:34 PM
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I think this is an OK thing. Fixie culture seems to abhor adding anything to the bike that makes it useful for anything beyond looking cool. Cargo/fred culture is all about practicality.

It's also good that cargo bikes are becoming the new status symbols, it seems like the bike industry has finally figured out that a lot of cultural trends start with the rich and that they will buy anything if it allows them to indicate their wealth.

Hence the $5000 cargo bikes that rich people buy to cart around their kids in. They may be trying too hard to look painfully hipster but the fact that they're willing to overpay for high-margin status symbols means that those same companies now have the money to do the R&D and headcount add it takes to make cheaper cargo bikes for the rest of us.

Last edited by when; 04-27-12 at 04:46 PM.
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Old 04-29-12, 08:44 PM
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I can't trust anyone who thinks that Pabst Blue Ribbon is a good beer, let alone an entire culture that worships it like manna from heaven. Or guys who think wearing jeans that prove they have legs like a woman's looks good.

Hipster culture has pretty much appropriated it's entire identity from other cultures, the urban bike messenger culture primarily, and elements of so many others. I wouldn't be surprised if they jumped on cargo bikes or started hauling trailers around. Of course, they'll all think it was their idea in the first place....

If regular bike riders and people who would otherwise be buying crossover SUVs starting riding cargo bikes, well, that would be something different.

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Old 04-29-12, 11:27 PM
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I live in San Francisco and the writer is exaggerating like crazy. Maybe there are a few cargo bikes over in the Sunset district, but I really doubt that they outnumber other bikes at the local coffee shop. Must have been a group ride or something. Over here in hipster central, the Mission District, cargo bikes are still fairly rare. I have a Big Dummy and so I notice when I see anything similar. But there is one reason why cargo bikes cannot and will not be the next big thing for hipsters - they are too darned big. I tried using my Big Dummy as my main commuter and gave up because it was too painful to carry it up and down the stairs every day. It's length also makes it hard to store indoors.

I rode across town today (not on the Big Dummy), through the Mission District to the Castro and I saw lots of bikes. Only one cargo bike. However, the guy on the cargo bike (a Yuba Mondo) was "surfing" it down Valencia St. (By surfing, I mean he was standing on the platform in back. Not really a good idea on a crowded street since you can't access the brakes back there).
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Old 04-30-12, 08:29 AM
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Sorry for going a bit off topic, but......
Nearly 30 yrs ago now I was driving through the Sunset district in SF. At one of the off-turns, under a street light there were about a dozen scooters parked. They were Vespas, or something similar, with at least a couple of mirrors each. The guys who were riding were standing around. They were wearing those old-style raincoats, made out of green canvas -or something similar- with a rubberized backing. They had white-wash graffiti of some sort painted on their backs.

It looked just like that cover photo of "Quadrophenia". There's no doubt that that's exactly what they were imitating. And even the scene matched; by the ocean, night-time, heavy and misty cool wet air, etc.

As I drove by I thought, "I'd love to join those guys....." To this day I think about it and I'd still like to join those guys. Oh, well...

Anyway, if cargo/utility bikes are becoming more popular there or anywhere else, then that can only be a good thing for bicycling.

I don't even need to wish to join those types. I already have. Hope they show up around here.
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Old 04-30-12, 09:45 AM
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There are a few cargo bikes around, mostly longtails by Surly and Yuba. The other thing that's getting to be popular around here, and in a way related, are the Surly Puglsey and Moonlander type of extreme fat tire bikes. There isn't a pressing need here for them- no beaches or snow or anything like that- but they are fun to ride and becoming increasingly popular.

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Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
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Old 04-30-12, 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Thor29 View Post
I live in San Francisco and the writer is exaggerating like crazy. Maybe there are a few cargo bikes over in the Sunset district, but I really doubt that they outnumber other bikes at the local coffee shop. Must have been a group ride or something. Over here in hipster central, the Mission District, cargo bikes are still fairly rare. I have a Big Dummy and so I notice when I see anything similar. But there is one reason why cargo bikes cannot and will not be the next big thing for hipsters - they are too darned big. I tried using my Big Dummy as my main commuter and gave up because it was too painful to carry it up and down the stairs every day. It's length also makes it hard to store indoors.

I rode across town today (not on the Big Dummy), through the Mission District to the Castro and I saw lots of bikes. Only one cargo bike. However, the guy on the cargo bike (a Yuba Mondo) was "surfing" it down Valencia St. (By surfing, I mean he was standing on the platform in back. Not really a good idea on a crowded street since you can't access the brakes back there).
I agree, but expected exaggeration from a site entitled "gizmodo".

The surfer is probably someone affiliated with Rock the Bike - they are good at that.
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Old 04-30-12, 02:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Nightdiver View Post
I think the big difference I've noticed between cargo bikes and fixed geared bikes is the demographics of the early adopters. Cargo bikes are a nice mix of moms, freds, hipsters, etc, whereas it was almost entirely the hipsters on fixed gears at first. Also, while fixed geared bikes didn't really do a whole lot to help develop a useful cycling culture in the US, if people are latching onto cargo bikes, that signals an awesome shift in the right direction.
Agreed... I like the cargo bike trend
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Old 04-30-12, 02:52 PM
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It figures. When I start thinking about a fixie is when they lose their coolness. (Maybe someone knew that) A cargo bike is more easily Fredded out, though. I could get into this trend.
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Old 04-30-12, 02:55 PM
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One more thought.... I see some people riding cargo bikes for their utility. One guy in particular is pretty much car-free (has a pickup truck he hasn't used in a while that he's trying to sell), and uses his bike for transport, including moving big stuff (furniture and the like). There are several people I know who seem to like that heavy duty vibe of the cargo bike, but don't necessarily want or need the bike to carry stuff, so they go for the Pugsly or other fat-tire bike instead.
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Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
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Old 04-30-12, 02:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Yo Spiff View Post
It figures. When I start thinking about a fixie is when they lose their coolness. (Maybe someone knew that) A cargo bike is more easily Fredded out, though. I could get into this trend.
Meh. Try the fixie; if you like riding it and it's cool to you, that's all that matters.
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Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
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Old 04-30-12, 03:37 PM
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The next hipster trend will be recumbents. Before disagreeing, think about it: they already have the beards and drink grandpa's favorite beer. Its because Hipsters love un-cool things and bents and grandpa are the King of uncool (un-cool to most people...not me)
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Old 04-30-12, 06:18 PM
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Originally Posted by CabezaShok View Post
The next hipster trend will be recumbents. Before disagreeing, think about it: they already have the beards and drink grandpa's favorite beer. Its because Hipsters love un-cool things and bents and grandpa are the King of uncool (un-cool to most people...not me)
but recumbent require, in addtion to beards and PBK, an engineering degree and a visible belly....... so it is simply a matter of time for fixies conversion to bents.
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Old 04-30-12, 09:26 PM
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I have had my cargo bike (a Trek Transport named Clutch Cargo) less than two weeks. I'm amazed at how much attention it attracts. Happy attention, no less. People have talked to me more on this bike than any other (maybe that's because I'm so much slower on it!). It seems to set off little light bulbs of possibility in people's minds about what they could haul with such a bike.
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Old 05-01-12, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Doohickie View Post
Meh. Try the fixie; if you like riding it and it's cool to you, that's all that matters.
Someone gave me a well used 80's vintage Benotto yesterday. I'm thinking of making a SS out of that. Probably with mustache bars, just because I love the way they look. All the SS riders will now abandon their SS bikes and move onto the next big thing:

Originally Posted by CabezaShok View Post
The next hipster trend will be recumbents. Before disagreeing, think about it: they already have the beards and drink grandpa's favorite beer. Its because Hipsters love un-cool things and bents and grandpa are the King of uncool (un-cool to most people...not me)
I'm ready to kill the coolness of this trend early on, since I already have a bent hanging in my garage. Bents can be fredded out quite nicely as well.
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