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Any other Burley Travoy style trailers out there? Or homemade ideas?

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Any other Burley Travoy style trailers out there? Or homemade ideas?

Old 10-28-16, 08:12 AM
  #26  
keg61
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Originally Posted by jdoff View Post
Could you say where you found the flex connector that fits into the Burley hitch? I think I found most of the other parts you've used.

Product: Folding Hand Truck 110Lb. Capacity, Aluminum, Model# KC10061
12 1/2in. x 2 1/4in. Tire with 5-Spoked Wheel | Pneumatic Spoked Wheels| Northern Tool + Equipment
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0038LPOD6

I'm very interested in this project, because I like the idea of the Travoy but not the expense. Do you have bags that you use with this, or do you just haul boxes?
I like what you've got going here, I'm planning a trailer build to transport my tricycle based on the Ironton 40"x48" trailer kit from Northern Tool. I think it will be just about perfect for less than half what a full size trailer costs at Tractor Supply (sorry i didn't include a link , i suck at that stuff)
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Old 10-31-16, 01:39 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by MrYummieandMe View Post
OK, well this thread has been resurrected a few times, and this one I'm doing isn't the longest pull from dormancy, LOL! I'm trying to figure out how to convert an old Burley trailer from an axle mount hitch system, to a seat post mount system, as used on the Travoy. My new touring bike, the Marrakesh, while great, is absolutely incompatible with the old-school Y-hitch and rebuilding the rear hub to accommodate a longer axle so I can use the Burley Steel Hitch connector seems an unreasonable length to go. I read this thread with interest. I'm thinking I could bend some aluminum tubing into a seatpost-connector arm that I'd mount to the old trailer. It seems to me that the Travoy mount only allows for side-to-side play. How does the trailer/Travoy stay on the ground when the bike leans, as in a turn? Doesn't the hitch need to allow for more of a universal rotation? I'd appreciate the insight of anyone who has experimented with adapting to a seatpost mounting system, as done in the thread. How did you overcome the physics involved, here? How does the Travoy do it?
Bending aluminium is something I would not do. I have bent steel but you need to read about it so the tube does not collapse. Plug one end, fill it with sand, plug other end and bend arould a pre made piece of wood that is securely fixed to something solid. Try Instructables - DIY How To Make Instructions
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Old 10-31-16, 06:54 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by badmother View Post
Bending aluminium is something I would not do. I have bent steel but you need to read about it so the tube does not collapse. Plug one end, fill it with sand, plug other end and bend arould a pre made piece of wood that is securely fixed to something solid. Try Instructables - DIY How To Make Instructions
LOL! Yeah, you're right. I meant steel, and miswrote. That said, I wound up utilizing the larger changeable dropout mounting bolt to secure a slightly ground-to-shape Burley Steel Hitch. The combo of the Salsa and the Burley is great: I call it my pickup. It took some thinking, but I thunk a bit, and now I have the simpler, cheaper solution working out great!salsaburley.jpgIMG_2352.jpg

Last edited by MrYummieandMe; 10-31-16 at 07:06 AM.
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Old 10-31-16, 12:00 PM
  #29  
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I don't know what Travoy's cost, but a Bob Yak with trailer bag runs just over $300. There wern't knock-off's when I bought the Yak, but I'm glad I didn't wait for one. None of the cheap knock-off Bob Yak's come close to matching its weight or weight capacity.

The Travoy was around when I was shopping for a trailer. I decided, without even trying one, that that much flat surface perpendicular to the line of travel would generate serious amounts of wind drag. I know one person with a Travoy, and when I encounter them I drop them like they are standing still. I often see them on the bus with it on a 7 mile run that I usually much rather ride than take the bus.

The idea put out by the op of using a luggage trailer is pretty ingenious. In addition to being cheaper, the more open construction using tubes vs a large, flat, plate gives an aero advantage. Personally, if the goal was to have a way to tote the folded bike, I would dispense with the expense and weight of a suitcase and just bungee the folded bike to the luggage carrier.

If I were going to attempt to reverse engineer a Travoy I would avoid using any OEM Burley components unless used. better to just buy a Travoy than to pay through the nose for a real Travoy hitch to use with an off-brand luggage roller. A tandem bicycle stoker stem is designed to attach the vertically oriented Captain's seatpost to the horizontally oriented Stoker stem. For the flexible coupling I would consider several bungee cords in parallel.
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Old 11-07-16, 08:50 AM
  #30  
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Projects like this---how to connect a load-bearing trail-along unit to the bike---allows us to show what ingenious and adaptive monkeys we are! I like the DIY Travoy of the OP, but more than that, I like that he made one himself! Personally, I don't know about bungies in parallel to duplicate the flex connector, but you probably are on to something. After laying my bike down a couple times with the Travoy-ish connector, it has softened to the point of actual flexibility, and my gut instincts say the engineering and design-build behind the flex connector and the hitch, individually as well as combined, is far superior to a short sheaf of several bungies. While not cheap, they're not prohibitively expensive. The flex connector is regularly available for either square or round tubing in the under $20 range, and retails for $22...I got mine for $18 or 19, I believe; the hitch was $25, and is well-engineered to facilitate the connector, and creates a steady, stable coupling under motion (man that sounds awesome...sorry!). The connector on the old school Y-hitch will disassemble a there is a flex connector there-in: so that may be a cheap option to find that part in any trailer project. I didn't discover this fact until after I had already bought my flex connector. My 20+ year old Burley was an almost unheard of $75 from a pair of righteous ladies in Milwakee, Oregon, and I use the heck out of my "pick up truck" configuration. I'm just not sure I feel the whole Travoy design. I'm not pushing the trailer over it on others, I hope, but describing my project, but I feel it is far more versatile than the Travoy, which feels very limited in it's utilitarian capacity: how much can you actually carry? How does it handle in corners? It does seem more "polite" than the standard trailer designs, which do have the ability, unfortunately, to shock some drivers into making poor decisions, like starting to pass behind the bike before realizing a trailer is there. The Travoy seems like a clever urban commuter idea, but how do they tour?
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Old 07-15-19, 12:17 AM
  #31  
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I just got a burley during a REI sale
I am extremely unimpressed with its build quality and find to be extremely overpriced for what it is
It has the build quality of a bad Walmart bike and several sloppy design features
The Wike appears to be far superior and I think a homemade Version would have to be pretty bad to be worse
The only thing that I think that the Burnley excels in is in looking good from a distance

Last edited by bikebikebike; 07-15-19 at 12:22 AM.
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Old 07-18-19, 09:11 AM
  #32  
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Simple, lightweight, slim for storage

Using only materials I had on hand I created a very load capable trailer that with a fitted tarp and small cleat style straps...I have a versatile, adaptable trailer for any of my needs.

Pallet
Nuts, bolts and washers
Oak stain
The landfill pick pile free child carrier



Removed the shell and using pallet boards the dimensions were perfect. I trimmed them to 40" or 44" length and utilized 3 others for cross supports beneath


12, 3/8" Diameter bolts, washers and lock washers.


Undercarriage visual


The hitch assembly that came with the trailer child carrier


Deck removed to stain as one piece


Stained(liberally), clear coat(heavy), reassembled



Love the versatility the open deck allows


Already working for me


Heavy load full of camp stoves and fuel


Sleek, slim, lightweight

Thanks for looking.

Any feedback, opinions and thoughts always welcome...I would love to hear what anyone might include, add, eliminate, do entirely different...let's hear it lol!
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Old 07-20-19, 10:37 PM
  #33  
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Bike trailers are good but they can be a bit weighty and the hitches tend to be poor. Mine is the Avenir Cleveland.

But I wanted something bigger. So I made this.
Carrying a lot of weight is fine, the secret is to keep it as low as possible, and don't put all the weight on the tail.
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Old 07-22-19, 05:20 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Miller72 View Post
Using only materials I had on hand I created a very load capable trailer that with a fitted tarp and small cleat style straps...I have a versatile, adaptable trailer for any of my needs.

Pallet
Nuts, bolts and washers
Oak stain
The landfill pick pile free child carrier



Removed the shell and using pallet boards the dimensions were perfect. I trimmed them to 40" or 44" length and utilized 3 others for cross supports beneath


12, 3/8" Diameter bolts, washers and lock washers.


Undercarriage visual


The hitch assembly that came with the trailer child carrier


Deck removed to stain as one piece


Stained(liberally), clear coat(heavy), reassembled



Love the versatility the open deck allows


Already working for me


Heavy load full of camp stoves and fuel


Sleek, slim, lightweight

Thanks for looking.

Any feedback, opinions and thoughts always welcome...I would love to hear what anyone might include, add, eliminate, do entirely different...let's hear it lol!
Nice! I used cedar fence boards to form the base of my Burley mod. The 2x4s might get heavy, though you did seal them. I think stipping the trailer down to make a flatbed is an awesome expansion to a bicycle's capabilities! I love my trailer, and it takes a beating. Great job!
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Old 07-22-19, 05:25 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by bikebikebike View Post
I just got a burley during a REI sale
I am extremely unimpressed with its build quality and find to be extremely overpriced for what it is
It has the build quality of a bad Walmart bike and several sloppy design features
The Wike appears to be far superior and I think a homemade Version would have to be pretty bad to be worse
The only thing that I think that the Burnley excels in is in looking good from a distance
Thanks for reviving the thread! I think you might be the only person who feels that way. I don't know Wike, personally. My Burley trailer is modded from the exact same trailer I used to take my son down dirt fire trails in when he was younger. He just turned 29! I'm not sure I agree with your assessment that it's a surprisingly cheap product, though Burley does make entry-level products. My trailer was top-of-the-line, and its build quality shows! An amazing bit of kit...nearly 30 years on that still hauls lots of weight. Maybe not tons, but definitely 100+ pounds, on occasion. What's a Wike?
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Old 07-22-19, 10:57 AM
  #36  
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Wike is a Canadian trailer maker. https://wicycle.com/ nice stuff, a bit clunky in ways but very accessible/maintainable/adaptable.
They also make a tow behind sign carrier that is neat.
I have a BOB and a big two wheel kid trailer.
The Travoy flexes on the plastic hinges and wheels wobble. "Banjo" fitting is stiff as a rock and torques the seattube such that many bike makes ,Brompton for one , say not to use it.
I know the gushing reviews it gets and am glad it appears to hold up , and now that they are carrying replacement hinges I am assuming they are repairable, something they were not a year ago.
That they need to carry them is interesting, implying demand, and I had seen several listed with broken hinges
If you have seen vids of them or watched a loaded one from the side , the hinges flex and bounce all over
as an inexpensive light trailer it is ok, and I know that , like most trailers , they get overloaded and abused.
Nice to know they seem to be able to take it, but I find it overpriced for its quality, which did not impress me
when compared to $100 direct sales chinese trailers. Maybe the quality has changed since it was first released
or that the most enthused are very light users where most anything will suffice.

It may be a price point thing, as many of the European trailers start at $500, and that may be what one needs to have better design.
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Old 08-15-19, 08:22 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by trrubicon06 View Post
I like the handtruck style trailer idea of the Burley Travoy, but I don't like the price. I was thinking about using an aluminum folding hand truck, but most use plastic parts where the wheels fold and I don't trust it. All I want is to put a suitcase on it for towing behind my brompton. When not riding the brompton is stowed in the suitcase.

Cart style in question...

Why not just buy a suitcase the turns into a trailer? Bike Friday has them.
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Old 08-16-19, 02:29 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by tim24k View Post
Why not just buy a suitcase the turns into a trailer?
Mine will go up a 5ins kerb at 20 mph without a problem. Not sure how a suitcase on tiny wheels, with no suspension, is gonna manage on the MUP/trails...
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