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Fear bike issues

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Old 12-21-17, 04:19 AM
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nob
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Fear bike issues

Guys

In the dead of winter, what do most people do if their bike punctures or another issue. Itís so cold out that even if I carry material to fix and learn to fix, itíll be hard to operate your in these sub zero conditions. And you will have to take gloves out to work on the bike. Another option I guess is just calling a large Uber and putting it in the trunk to the nearest bike shop

Would appreciate some advice

Thx
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Old 12-21-17, 08:25 AM
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rumrunn6
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courage
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Old 12-21-17, 08:40 AM
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_ForceD_
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Well...if your contingency is to call an Uber...or anyone else for that matter...make sure that you're not riding in a cell dead zone. I once learned that the hard way. Although I'm strictly a roadie...I was out in the countryside on a clear, sunny, but frigid day with temps in the teens (Fahrenheit). I couldn't manipulate anything to get the flat fixed with cycling gloves on. And when I took them off my finger got too cold for it in a minute. I was dressed fine for cycling. But when I stopped, all sweaty, and had to walk about a mile (in cycling shoes no less)...I was freezing!!! Since then...I try to make sure my rides on really cold days remain somewhat close to civilization.

Another option is to utilize some sort of puncture resistant tire liner, like these for example https://www.walmart.com/ip/Slime-Fla...&wl13=&veh=sem

Dan

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Old 12-21-17, 09:06 AM
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nob
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any drawbacks in ride quality to using the tire liner
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Old 12-21-17, 09:06 AM
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Daniel4
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Originally Posted by nob View Post
Guys

In the dead of winter, what do most people do if their bike punctures or another issue. Itís so cold out that even if I carry material to fix and learn to fix, itíll be hard to operate your in these sub zero conditions. And you will have to take gloves out to work on the bike. Another option I guess is just calling a large Uber and putting it in the trunk to the nearest bike shop

Would appreciate some advice

Thx
First, train yourself to fix flats in the cold. Better still, carry a spare tube which is a lot faster. Wear fingerless wool gloves.

Secondly, if you can join a group or club that will help you in emergencies, join. In Toronto CAA has bicycle transport services. I also recently joined Toronto Cycling Network.
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Old 12-21-17, 09:23 AM
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Never flatted a studded tire, very beefy, thick casing. Latex gloves will work some to keep your hands warm and clean. Good bike prep and check works wonders.
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Old 12-21-17, 05:17 PM
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Originally Posted by _ForceD_ View Post
Well...if your contingency is to call an Uber...or anyone else for that matter...make sure that you're not riding in a cell dead zone. I once learned that the hard way. Although I'm strictly a roadie...I was out in the countryside on a clear, sunny, but frigid day with temps in the teens (Fahrenheit). I couldn't manipulate anything to get the flat fixed with cycling gloves on. And when I took them off my finger got too cold for it in a minute. I was dressed fine for cycling. But when I stopped, all sweaty, and had to walk about a mile (in cycling shoes no less)...I was freezing!!! Since then...I try to make sure my rides on really cold days remain somewhat close to civilization.


I worry about this, too, and also stay closer to civilization when the temperatures really drop. If I'm feeling a bit more adventurous, I pack some thin gloves/liners (for fixing flats in cold) and an extra sweater (so I don't die if I have to walk.)

The last time something like this happened I was fortunately on an icy road with wide MTB tires, and was able to slowly roll back toward civilization with a half inflated tube
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Old 12-21-17, 07:15 PM
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Originally Posted by nob View Post
any drawbacks in ride quality to using the tire liner
It adds 300g to your bike, thus making your bike another bit slower - not sure how much that affects you in winter. I for myself actually stopped using tire liners in winter (still on for my non-puncture proof summer slicks). Reason being that there is so much more tread that the likelihood of anything coming all the way into the tube is much less than on slicks. Haven't had any flat in the last two winter seasons from external objects, whereas this has been a huge issue on slicks before using liners.
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Old 12-26-17, 04:55 PM
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Thorn resistant tubes, inside the Studded MTB tires.. No Problems. OK, its not Fast. neither am I.





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Old 12-26-17, 08:58 PM
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No matter the preparation, skills, tools, and other items carried, an extended stop and even long walk are a possibility. Things happen.

First piece of winter repair gear I carry is a wool sweater vest. Step one of any cold weather repair stop is to add the wool layer under my outer shell.

With that, it's a matter of personal choice deciding how prepared you want to be. There are cell phone people, one-flat people (one tube, one C02), two-flat people (2x tube & C02), N flat people (tubes, patches, pump), and and the more extreme (tubes, patches, spare tire, patches, boot, plus a list of other items that serve as a testament to their previous road misadventures, including perhaps brake cables, shifter cables, spokes, Tyvec square, mylar emergency blanket, various bolts and hardware, zip-ties.)

Whatever you carry, know how to use, otherwise it's just weight and volume. That may mean volunteering at the local bike kitchen to learn.
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Old 12-31-17, 12:24 AM
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+1 on space blanket as a contingency. It always worried me to risk flats in January when it's 10į. Tubeless for winter now, always tubeless off-road.
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