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Cleated pedals & avoiding wet &/or cold feet

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Cleated pedals & avoiding wet &/or cold feet

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Old 08-22-18, 09:33 AM
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Cleated pedals & avoiding wet &/or cold feet

planning to search forums but instead of reviving an old thread(s), maybe ppl want to share their favorite cleated pedal/shoe solutions for wet &/or cold feet. meaning toe & shoe covers, rain shoes & winter boots

I just started using cleated pedals (SPD) so even tho I've got rock solid solutions for 1/2 clips on flat pedals, I need to come up with a new plan if I keep the cleated pedals on the bike(s). maybe not on ice, or in the snow, but certainly thru the Fall & Winter when ground conditions & stability aren't sketchy
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Old 08-23-18, 04:38 AM
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cleated pedals & avoiding wet &/or cold feet

I posted to recent Commuting Forum thread, "Rain Shoes":
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I distinguish "booties" (tight fitting neoprene shoe covers with an open sole for clip-ons) from this wrap-around Goretex "shoe cover," with an open sole secured by elastic straps. I find they provide good rain cover, especially over booties, as well as windscreen.
Besides two layers of thin and thick socks, I use neoprene booties with openings for cleats, and wrap around Goretex shoe covers with open soles (available at Belmont Wheelworks). I might use plastic bags inside the shoes as well.

I have posted about my experience with a similar set-up for platform pedals, using rubber Totes overshoes instead of neoprene booties.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
This past Monday (12/30/13) I did my 14 mile commute at about 15°F and tried a new set of foot coverings that IMO that kept my feet significantly warmer than usual. In the past I had bought a pair of neon green shoe covers made by Gore-Tex, for wet riding.

During the winter, I use platform pedals with toeclips, and my usual footwear is thin and thick socks, running shoes and Totes rubber overshoes. I use plastic bags over my running shoes to put on the Totes more easily (see the sequence below).

So with the additional Gore-Tex shoe coverings at 15ºF, I did not perceive cold until about mile 10, and I did not feel cold in the sense of permeating the soft tissues of my foot until about mile 12, but it was tolerable.

At about mile 12 I have a downhill run of several hundred yards that irreversibly drains the heat from my extremities. The next day at 21ºF, I rode without the Goretex, and started feeling cold at about mile 9 and finished significantly colder at my mile 14 destination than the day before.


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Old 08-23-18, 07:17 AM
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so maybe, since I've got cold weather solutions for my flat pedals & 1/2 clips, maybe it would be prudent to shelve the cleated pedals until the spring?
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Old 08-23-18, 07:55 AM
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I've got a short ride, usually doesn't get below 0F, I wear crew length running socks, which are moisture-wicking. When used for running, they help prevent blisters. When used for biking, they absorb moisture and dry relatively quickly. When your feet are dry they stay warmer. Always a pair of wool socks over that

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Old 08-23-18, 08:49 AM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
so maybe, since I've got cold weather solutions for my flat pedals & 1/2 clips, maybe it would be prudent to shelve the cleated pedals until the spring?
My winter riding is entirely on paved and mostly well-tended roads. My original wet and/or icy beater bike was a Mountain Bike with Schwalbe Marathon Winter studded tires, and platform pedals. Next I bought an aluminum Specialized Diverge with clipless pedals as a smoother-riding beater.

In the Winter it accomodates studded 28C Schwalbe tires.
My studded tires provide stability, and ice is infrequently encountered. I’m well adapted to clipless pedals, so as long as I’m aware of the road surface. I don’t think they are a problem for Winter riding. I prefer clipless to toeclips, despite what a fellow Metro Bostonian says in his signature line
Originally Posted by jimmuller
Real cyclists use toe clips.
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Old 08-23-18, 11:00 AM
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I use flat shoes (five ten's which use rubber that's extra grippy on flat pedals with pins).
And thick wool mix socks from DeFeet, I think these:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005CRML08/

It's worked very well for me. I think Five Ten also sells an insulated version of their shoe as well.

When I used to use clipless I'd use a similar arrangement, thick wool/blend socks, clipless shoe, pull-on overshoe over the shoe to block wind.
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Old 08-23-18, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
I use flat shoes (five ten's which use rubber that's extra grippy on flat pedals with pins)
I've read ppl writing about 5-10s for a while. finally got to hold a pair of cleated 5-10s. wow they are rigid! so you are using the same w/o the cleats? or do they make a flexible sole shoe as well? Are you using the same rigid type shoe, just w/o the cleats?
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Old 08-23-18, 11:56 AM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
I've read ppl writing about 5-10s for a while. finally got to hold a pair of cleated 5-10s. wow they are rigid! so you are using the same w/o the cleats? or do they make a flexible sole shoe as well? Are you using the same rigid type shoe, just w/o the cleats?
Oh no, I'm using the flats with a flat sole (Five Ten Freeriders, color black/khaki):
https://www.adidasoutdoor.com/FT07.html?dwvar_FT07_color=Black&cgid=fiveten-men-bike-shoes

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Old 08-23-18, 11:59 AM
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Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
Oh no, I'm using the flats with a flat sole
gotcha
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Old 08-23-18, 12:10 PM
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The easy (but no so cheap) way to keep your feet warm down to ~25F (wet or dry) is with a good cycling boot like the Fasterkatt by 45North. Lugged mountain style tread, takes SPD cleats. (They make a boot that is a real step warmer but I have no need for it here in Portland. If I lived in Boston or Ann Arbor, both cities I have ridden care-free all winter in, I'd look at it.)

There are several other boots that are roughly the same idea. The Fasterkatt fit my feet like they were made for them and work very well for me. 80 miles with 10 of that on gravel on a rainy December day in the low 30s was no biggie.

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Old 08-23-18, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
gotcha
p.s. You mentioned the clipless five tens being particularly stiff and rigid. The flats are like that, they're like average regular shoes in being somewhat pliable and comfortable to walk around in. With clipless they make the shoe super stiff and rigid, but with flats they can leave being stiff and rigid to the pedal itself.

With shorter flat pedals they were fine but I did find them the most comfortable with longer slightly concave pedals, I use the Dmr Vault Pedals and it's the most comfortable shoe/pedal combination I've ever used on a bike:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MN2ESSI/

A little closer to the topic of this thread there's a waterproof version as well though it's flat not clipless:
https://www.adidasoutdoor.com/FT16.html?dwvar_FT16_color=Black&cgid=fiveten-men-bike-shoes

When I using clipless I preferred to use shoe covers which work better with clipless shoes with a heel. Below freezing, rain isn't really an issue. Above freezing when it's still cool you can wear long waterproof pants and shoe covers.

But when it's warm plus raining there's no perfect solution. If you wear long waterproof pants you'll overheat. If you wear shorts the water will drip down your leg into the shoe. I've seen some people use spd sandals riding in the rain when they commute every day regardless of conditions. Wool blend socks might also work in keeping your feet warmish even when wet. But I don't think there's a solution that would let you bike without overheating and also keep your feet completely dry when it's raining hard and also hot out.

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Old 08-23-18, 03:44 PM
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MTB sandals for me year-round, so that I can adjust the straps depending on which socks and how many pair (1 or 2) and thus avoid coldness due to being too tight. Then for rain or winter the showers pass shoe covers as they are extremely flexible/loose over the sandals compared to your usual wind cover which will be snug to tight and then break in addition to stopping all circulation. My first pair of showers pass booties I cut out a hole for the sandal, but really for the second pair, I just started clipping in and let the hole form where it wants,then there is a lot smaller hole after that. I may still put in a toe warmer pack on top and between socks when below about 30F depending the length of ride. I may also switch out sandals to regular winter boots when down in the single digits F or below and just ride as platforms. Eggbeaters for me instead of SPD as they are easier for me to catch on the first try with the recumbent. Almost all my rides are in the 60-90 minute range, I rarely go longer so no experience for winter touring or half-day rides. Winter socks are dense wool like smartwool next to skin and then loose wool over like wigwam.

https://www.showerspass.com/products/club-shoe-covers
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Old 08-23-18, 06:54 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
planning to search forums but instead of reviving an old thread(s), maybe ppl want to share their favorite cleated pedal/shoe solutions for wet &/or cold feet. meaning toe & shoe covers, rain shoes & winter boots

I just started using cleated pedals (SPD) so even tho I've got rock solid solutions for 1/2 clips on flat pedals, I need to come up with a new plan if I keep the cleated pedals on the bike(s). maybe not on ice, or in the snow, but certainly thru the Fall & Winter when ground conditions & stability aren't sketchy
First, keep the clipless even on snow and ice. Clipless allows you to use more body English if the bike starts to slip. Additionally, the last thing want to do if you start to slide on ice is to put your foot out to “catch” yourself. You won’t and you’ll end up injuring the leg you “put out”. I’ve popped a hamstring doing so. Better to just fall to the ground than causing a longer lasting injury.

Winter biking and clipless does require some preplanning, however. First, get another pair of shoes but get them 1 to 2 sizes larger than you would normally wear. Summer shoes fit close and adding in a thick sock can end up cramping your feet which makes them colder. A larger size shoe has more room for extra socks.

Second, wind is not your friend. Cold weather riding is made tougher by evaporation of that sweat you are collecting. It’s more important to protect against wind than it is against sweat and, possibly, cold. Summer shoes are very well ventilated. Try to find shoes that are less well ventilated. Luckily, this usually means cheaper shoes. And, again, get them in a larger than normal size.

You may also want to use shoe covers or a neoprene sock. Shoe covers are difficult to use since they tend to be too small for larger feet (>46 European) which makes them difficult to put on. I use these socks in addition to a thin wool sock for fall and warmer winter riding. I also use a pair of waterproof Goretex Shimano shoes when I don’t use boots.

Finally, you probably will need to block up the holes in the bottom of the shoe. I use aluminum furnace tape and cover the whole area of the sole below the insole. I also use an aerogel insole something like these. These will greatly lower the temperature in which the shoes are comfortable. I also use the same insoles for my very cold weather boots.
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Old 09-14-18, 01:45 PM
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Excellent post, couldn't agree more cyccommute

Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post


First, keep the clipless even on snow and ice. Clipless allows you to use more body English if the bike starts to slip. Additionally, the last thing want to do if you start to slide on ice is to put your foot out to “catch” yourself. You won’t and you’ll end up injuring the leg you “put out”. I’ve popped a hamstring doing so. Better to just fall to the ground than causing a longer lasting injury.

Winter biking and clipless does require some preplanning, however. First, get another pair of shoes but get them 1 to 2 sizes larger than you would normally wear. Summer shoes fit close and adding in a thick sock can end up cramping your feet which makes them colder. A larger size shoe has more room for extra socks.

Second, wind is not your friend. Cold weather riding is made tougher by evaporation of that sweat you are collecting. It’s more important to protect against wind than it is against sweat and, possibly, cold. Summer shoes are very well ventilated. Try to find shoes that are less well ventilated. Luckily, this usually means cheaper shoes. And, again, get them in a larger than normal size.

You may also want to use shoe covers or a neoprene sock. Shoe covers are difficult to use since they tend to be too small for larger feet (>46 European) which makes them difficult to put on. I use these socks in addition to a thin wool sock for fall and warmer winter riding. I also use a pair of waterproof Goretex Shimano shoes when I don’t use boots.

Finally, you probably will need to block up the holes in the bottom of the shoe. I use aluminum furnace tape and cover the whole area of the sole below the insole. I also use an aerogel insole something like these. These will greatly lower the temperature in which the shoes are comfortable. I also use the same insoles for my very cold weather boots.
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Old 09-14-18, 02:07 PM
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I use SPD compatible pedals and Lake MXZ302 shoes in the rain/winter.
Only goes to around 10 degrees F in my area though.

DSCN0337 by 1nterceptor, on Flickr
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Old 09-14-18, 07:20 PM
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Originally Posted by parkbrav View Post
Excellent post, couldn't agree more cyccommute
And if I may add, I use Hot Paws for toes inside my shoes when it's cold. Make sure you ventilate them before inserting them because with all the wind blocking, they will starve for oxygen within the hour and stop producing heat. If you haven't expended all its heat (ie, still oxidation left), put them in an air tight ziplock bag until next time.
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Old 09-15-18, 07:07 AM
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Ditch the clipless set up and change to platform pedals with proper winter boots.
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Old 09-15-18, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
Ditch the clipless set up and change to platform pedals with proper winter boots.
There are any number of “proper winter boots” made for cycling that include clipless. 45NTH has the Wølfgar and Wölvhammer. The Lake MXZ boot is a “winter” boot. There are lots and lots of others.

But my take on rumrunn6’s question is that he doesn’t want something that is for super cold weather but more for the transition times. A “winter boot” would be overkill for that kind of usage. I have Lake MXZ303s and they are way too hot for anything above about 20°F.

And, I already pointed out the problems with platform pedals above.
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Old 09-15-18, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post

And, I already pointed out the problems with platform pedals above.
I have 11 Canadian winters behind me all ridden with pinned platform pedals and insulated hiking boots plus gaiters, my set up has never failed me and that's what I will continue to use.
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Old 09-15-18, 04:03 PM
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SPuD pedals can be a Heat sink, sucking warmth out of your feet.

You may not want that..
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Old 09-15-18, 07:42 PM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
I have 11 Canadian winters behind me all ridden with pinned platform pedals and insulated hiking boots plus gaiters, my set up has never failed me and that's what I will continue to use.
That’s great. Keep it up. When you hit 30 we can talk.

On the other hand, you answer was not the answer to rumrunn6’s question. He specifically said he didn’t know if he was going to ride in ice and snow. That means warmer weather where your solution is overkill and counter productive.

Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
SPuD pedals can be a Heat sink, sucking warmth out of your feet.

You may not want that..
No, they aren’t. At least not if you plan correctly. Already addressed above.
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Old 09-16-18, 06:59 PM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
I have 11 Canadian winters behind me all ridden with pinned platform pedals and insulated hiking boots plus gaiters, my set up has never failed me and that's what I will continue to use.
I have 10 winters behind me and totally agree. It may not be relevant to the OP's question, but in ice and snow and frigid cold, platforms are the way to go, IMO. All the seasoned winter commuters I know here run platforms and warm winter boots when things get cold. I took their advice and save the SPDs for fairweather riding, and it was a huge improvement.

If temps are above freezing, toe caps or booties work fine. No need to overthink it.
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