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Which Road Shoe Cover/Bootie?

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Which Road Shoe Cover/Bootie?

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Old 11-11-18, 04:43 PM
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Which Road Shoe Cover/Bootie?

I am looking for a shoe cover/bootie that can get me into the 20's F for 2+ hours riding time. I have a couple of pair of insulated covers and wool socks, that an hour into a ride, my feet are numb from the cold. I have two bikes I ride with spd-sl pedals that I will use until the temps get to 20 or so. I then switch the pedals on one bike to spiked platforms with a winter shoe combo for those snow, ice, or below 20 temp rides.

I would consider a dedicated winter road shoe but for the few times a season they would be used, I can't justify the price.

TIA
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Old 11-12-18, 07:13 AM
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Have a look at Grip Grab.

https://www.gripgrab.com/collections/road-shoe-covers

You might be interested in the Arctic or Arctic High-Vis.

I'm using the lighter Race Thermo version down to the high 20's with no cold feet. If the temps go lower then I'll use chemical warmers.

The are not available through US retailers but can be ordered through Wiggle. Size up.


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Old 11-12-18, 10:23 PM
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Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
Have a look at Grip Grab.

https://www.gripgrab.com/collections/road-shoe-covers

You might be interested in the Arctic or Arctic High-Vis.

I'm using the lighter Race Thermo version down to the high 20's with no cold feet. If the temps go lower then I'll use chemical warmers.

The are not available through US retailers but can be ordered through Wiggle. Size up.


-Tim-
Thanks for the recommendation, these never came up in my searches.
They look promising, only concern I have, without some type of closure how difficult are they to pull on over your shoes?
I watched the video, they look easy enough to pull on, though I am dealing with arthritis in both hands.
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Old 11-12-18, 10:41 PM
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I would just buy a winter shoe and use a cover then you can just worry less and be warm its just money , i dont mind a few measly hundred bucks for shoes im going to use to stay on the bike .

But the cheapest option i use is two large wool socks 80% wool size 12 plus . cut a hole out for my cleat and glue emergency blanket strips in between the socks . i use a fishing line to sew the hole edges together for a clean look . cost so far is 8 bucks . but they are not waterproof yet . i do have a roll of duck tape to make them , and i plan on cuttin the backs open to install a zipper or velcro for faster on and off. But if it is raining and below 40 id just stay indoors get a better work out in the basement safe and dry.
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Old 11-13-18, 06:33 AM
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Originally Posted by 02Giant View Post
I am looking for a shoe cover/bootie that can get me into the 20's F for 2+ hours riding time. I have a couple of pair of insulated covers and wool socks, that an hour into a ride, my feet are numb from the cold.

I have two bikes I ride with spd-sl pedals that I will use until the temps get to 20 or so. I then switch the pedals on one bike to spiked platforms with a winter shoe combo for those snow, ice, or below 20 temp rides.

I would consider a dedicated winter road shoe but for the few times a season they would be used, I can't justify the price.

TIA
My commute is about 1.5 hours in the Winter, rarely in single digits, and I dont think a Winter shoe is worth it. I wear thin and thick socks in my clipless shoes, and a shoe cover over my bootie. I suggest one with a velcro closure; zippers were difficult to close. .
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Besides two layers of thin and thick socks, I use neoprene booties with openings for cleats, and wrap around Goretex shoe covers with open soles (available at Belmont Wheelworks). I might use plastic bags inside the shoes as well.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I distinguish "booties" (tight fitting neoprene shoe covers with an open sole for clip-ons) from this wrap-around Goretex "shoe cover," with an open sole secured by elastic straps. I find they provide good rain cover, especially over booties, as well as windscreen.

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Old 11-13-18, 12:00 PM
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IMO, any of the higher-quality neoprene overshoes will probably do the trick. You might have a look at Wiggle; there are quite a few options available at a reasonable price. I'm using SealSkinz with thick wool socks and road shoes and doing well into the 20s for 2 hours.

I have yet to try chemical warmers, but they might be a good idea - this time of year in Wisconsin, you can get a huge handful of them at the grocery store for like $5.

Someday I might invest in winter cycling boots (and the corresponding SPD pedal system that I'll need), but it's hard to justify, especially when that investment is halfway to an entry-level fatbike.
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Old 11-13-18, 02:31 PM
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Originally Posted by 02Giant View Post
I am looking for a shoe cover/bootie that can get me into the 20's F for 2+ hours riding time. I have a couple of pair of insulated covers and wool socks, that an hour into a ride, my feet are numb from the cold. I have two bikes I ride with spd-sl pedals that I will use until the temps get to 20 or so. I then switch the pedals on one bike to spiked platforms with a winter shoe combo for those snow, ice, or below 20 temp rides.

I would consider a dedicated winter road shoe but for the few times a season they would be used, I can't justify the price.

TIA
Performance neoprene booties were pretty good for the money. I can't say if the new version are good and they were a little difficult to put on but I used them for 20 to 25 years down to really stupid temperatures. The extra large were difficult to fit over a size 10 to size 11 shoe however.

I would also suggest a larger size shoe for winter riding. Those wool socks are thicker and a close fitting summer shoe is just going to cut off circulation.
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Old 11-14-18, 11:09 AM
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Any old neoprene will do but what sets different shoe covers apart are the seal and closure. Some are better than others.

One of the reasons I was drawn to the Gripgrab product was complete lack of zippers. The "Intelliseal" system at the bottom is very effective at keeping moisture and cold air out. The Kevlar hem and toe are a nice touch in terms of durability.

I'm not saying they are the best in the world and they certainly are not inexpensive but they are one of the better designed products out there.


Originally Posted by 02Giant View Post
Thanks for the recommendation, these never came up in my searches.
They look promising, only concern I have, without some type of closure how difficult are they to pull on over your shoes?
I watched the video, they look easy enough to pull on, though I am dealing with arthritis in both hands.
They go on the leg before the shoe is put on and pulled down over the top of the shoe. The "X" off road versions are slightly more difficult to put on than the road version but both go on just like the video shown below.

I can't speak to how it would be with arthritis but my day will come, probably sooner rather than later.



-Tim-

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Old 11-14-18, 04:25 PM
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Shoes may just be too tight, so circulation constricted, and then the insulation,
being stretchy is not helping either.. it's pulling tight, too..


and SPD cleats can be heat sinks sucking the heat out ..





..

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Old 11-14-18, 08:50 PM
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Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
Any old neoprene will do but what sets different shoe covers apart are the seal and closure. Some are better than others.

One of the reasons I was drawn to the Gripgrab product was complete lack of zippers. The "Intelliseal" system at the bottom is very effective at keeping moisture and cold air out. The Kevlar hem and toe are a nice touch in terms of durability.

I'm not saying they are the best in the world and they certainly are not inexpensive but they are one of the better designed products out there.




They go on the leg before the shoe is put on and pulled down over the top of the shoe. The "X" off road versions are slightly more difficult to put on than the road version but both go on just like the video shown below.

I can't speak to how it would be with arthritis but my day will come, probably sooner rather than later.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xbGIgqYLY9Q


-Tim-
Thanks!

I decided to give them a go. I ordered a pair through Bike24. Wiggle was showing size XXL as the only size available, according to their sizing chart I required a XL.
I watched the video prior to purchasing, they didn't appear that they would be too difficult to pull on.
I'll need to make sure I use them with my looser fitting shoes. I should have kept the pair of Sidi's I gave away, they were a little oversized.
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Old 11-14-18, 09:02 PM
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Originally Posted by wipekitty View Post
IMO, any of the higher-quality neoprene overshoes will probably do the trick. You might have a look at Wiggle; there are quite a few options available at a reasonable price. I'm using SealSkinz with thick wool socks and road shoes and doing well into the 20s for 2 hours.

I have yet to try chemical warmers, but they might be a good idea - this time of year in Wisconsin, you can get a huge handful of them at the grocery store for like $5.

Someday I might invest in winter cycling boots (and the corresponding SPD pedal system that I'll need), but it's hard to justify, especially when that investment is halfway to an entry-level fatbike.
The difference in warmth and ease is night and day. I should have done it sooner. Only problem--is that they're so warm that much above freezing they're almost too warm....so if you have say a 20F commute in the morning they're perfect--but a 40F afternoon commute they're too hot.
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Old 11-15-18, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Marcus_Ti View Post
The difference in warmth and ease is night and day. I should have done it sooner. Only problem--is that they're so warm that much above freezing they're almost too warm....so if you have say a 20F commute in the morning they're perfect--but a 40F afternoon commute they're too hot.
Gotta agree on all counts...with the exception that my afternoon commutes are often 60F after a 20F morning commute. I've even had 70F commutes after a very cold morning. My boots feel like they are full of water by the time I get home.
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Old 12-12-18, 09:33 PM
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I like these. Gore c5 insulated. They don’t look stylish, but they are very warm.
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Old 12-16-18, 04:29 PM
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A little late to the convo but I wear neoprene socks over thin liner type socks. They keep my feet warm up to 2 hours before I have to start wiggling them to keep the blood moving. For shoes I wear regular running type shoes from Target that I don't mind getting dirty or we
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Old 12-19-18, 07:45 AM
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Originally Posted by pyze-guy View Post
I like these. Gore c5 insulated. They dont look stylish, but they are very warm.
Those look nice for very cold weather.

Can you say more about them?

Are they waterproof or resistant? What does the bottom look like? Durability?


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Old 12-23-18, 07:03 PM
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I can’t comment on being waterproof, haven’t used them that much. They are supposed to be water resistant. They are warm. My commute is 1 hour. Normally I’d wear thicker socks with toe warmers for anything below -5C. With these my feet are warmer at that temperature without the warmers and with mid weight wool socks. I have the l/xl and the fit fine over my size 12 shoes. They are pricey for booties, but compared to winter shoes a good price. Really happy so far

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